Future Tech: how Technology is changing how we monitor our health.
21:07

Future Tech: how Technology is changing how we monitor our health.

Tech Industry
[MUSIC] Hello everyone. Welcome back to the CNET stage at CES 2017. I'm Lindsey Turrentine, Editor in Chief of CNET.com. And for the next two minutes, we're gonna focus on what the future hold for the intersection of technology and health. Discussing this growing field with experts from pharmaceutical companies and device makers and insurance providers. So joining me now to talk about meds and tech and insurance are two luminaries. We've got Busy Burr, Vice President of Innovation and Head of Humana Health Ventures. And Dr Sabine Luik, Senior Vice President of Medical and Regulatory Affairs at Boehringer Ingelheim. Which I think I got correctly. Absolutely. Okay. Thank you so much for coming. And I wanted to start, I think what we, the interesting thing that we have to talk about here, is how technology can help us reach patients and people who might otherwise be underserved in the medical world. And, Sabina, I know that you Have a lot of interest in reaching people who might not be part of a conversation about developing pharmaceuticals, and why don't you talk a little bit about how you think about technology and what it does now and what it could do, to reach people who are otherwise under served? Thanks for your question. My team is working on developing new medicines as well as taking care of those under market and help in supportations. Now, when I think about clinical development of new drugs and what digital and technical innovation can do. We are using it already but the future could bring much, much more. We basically can bring clinical trials to the patient. At the moment the patients need to come to us. They need to come to their doctors. They need to find an opportunity. And yes, there are information offerings, but if you're really better enabled using electronic healthcare records and other systems to find the right patient and right physician for the right trials Be able to get more diversity into those patient groups you work with. And then, work with them much closer from identifying them, getting that data and giving them feedback, getting more data. I think that can in the future rally help making directive element more Touchable for the community and hopefully also faster and a little bit simpler. So does that mean that there may be people who otherwise, a typical drug trial would be possibly near where you are physically in a certain urban environment. That means we could get more rural participants. We could get participants from different backgrounds and ethnicities. And how would technology help make that faster? It would help make it faster in identifying them earlier, and it would make it faster because at the moment you collect data once a patient then visits a doctor for a predefined visit. With technology from variables to what you could see in the future in smart homes could get a more More fluid and fluid data transfer. You might be able to learn much more. Yes, you have your predefined measurement points, but you can get much more information and depending on the therapeutic area. Sometimes when it's also about behavior, what you're interested in for example, you can get much faster much more. So in other words, you might get information about how somebody is sleeping or how they're eating without having to ask them? How active they are, how much they move, right. You can get data from in the home that's not typical that you would see in a clinician's office. And so that helps research because you can get data in context about what's actually happening. We think about it at Humana about being able to have ways for our seniors to be able to stay in the home because we can have more monitors, more ways of allowing them to. Interventions before something bad happens and they end up in the hospital. So Do you think that there is technology that will be available to consumers that will help them talk to, say, their families about their personal health, and then also their insurance companies at the same time, or do you see this as still sort of fragmented What are the challenges around getting into people's homes and getting that data for you as an insurance provider right now? While we are an insurance provider we actually are a very health-focused company or very consumer facing company. And many of our members were medicare advantage providers. Some of our members are senior citizens and living in a home and we want them to be in the home for as long as possible. So in order for that to happen we can provide more kinds of tools for them to be able to Have more smart monitoring kinds of devices. Not just in their home, but on their person. But the downside of that, and I think we're at a tech conference. We all love technology here, that's why we're here. The downside of that is that we don't want to become overly reliant on these little tech devices in the home to take care of mom and grandma If we forget that actually health is driven by human connection and by voice, and by touch. And if we get too reliant on technology as the solve, we're gonna miss the whole point of what health is about, which is about heart and empathy, and love and connection. Do you think, and there are all kinds of studies for this show, right? That people need physical touch, for instance, to feel healthy. Do you think that there's a role either one of you, for this personal technology for data collection and monitoring, To get people to make that human connection more often. I mean we talk a lot about via our headsets the work that Facebook is doing with Oculus and you can see that not that far down the road they're probably thinking about how we have a virtual human experience as ironic as that sounds. Is that something that you think about? Then it could make it more often but more importantly it could. Lead to this interaction at the right point and time. Like often the question is when is the right point in time, when does someone need support? And to better find that moment in time, that valuable moment, I think that a lot of opportunity lies. Another challenge, I think, in addition to, that you really need to interact as human beings. I think is, especially from our perspective, how valid are the data you collect, right? How good is the quality? And there are a lot of regulatory aspects which then need to be taken into consideration because in the end, if you develop a new medicine or if you have the medicine on the market, the data you collect needs to pass a certain standard, and you need to be really able to rely on it so that they find regulatory acceptance. It isn't just about data. Data is something that You need for research. It's something that we all need. But it's what you do with that data and how you create personalized interactions. We were just talking about how data and analytics are great, but we actually don't want to give information to people. We want to communicate with them. We want to find ways to communicate with them in personalized ways. And so that means, really understanding how they wanna be communicated with and what kind of intervention they need. So, the data is fabulous and it's the first step. But it actually isn't the solution. Have you seen an implementation of technology in the home that you think is particularly compelling, when it comes to having this kind of human augmented or. Additive human experience. Do you wanna talk about? Yeah, I mean I think when you talk about in the home the question is, what do you mean? Do you mean the variable, do you mean something which you can attach to a device for example to, like we are having a partner with propeller help that you can add a device to an inhaler. That's in a kind of the first stages So what technology are you talking about? That's kind of the question. So they have first examples, but in the end how do you link everything together? You need to connect the patient, the provider, the insurance company or the health system in order to really get to meaningful information. And they have something to talk about and to learn from. And sometimes it isn't just the home. Sometimes it's the device, it's smarter and it can be mobile. You know, Livongo, some of you guys are probably familiar with Livongo which is a smart glucose meter which has intervention. It goes, it's data goes to the cloud, it has intervention and coaching built right in So it can engage and communicate with our members in a way that they wanna be engaged with at the time that matters the most. So it isn't so much plopping a robot or a device in the home, it's what solution are you trying to provide for him, what's most personalized. And how do you do it in human ways to that it doesn't seem like nagging? It's so, or creepy, right? Right, right. Like, this thing is watching me, like I don't know. Cuz we were talking earlier, I was talking with some colleagues and sometimes we think about monitoring the home as this way we can help keep gramma and granny safe. And it makes us feel great. Like whew, I don't have to worry about gramma and granny. But really, it may be that that isn't the best solve for gramma. It may not be the right answer. It might make us feel better, but it may not be the thing that makes gramma feel better. She wants to get out of the home. She wants to get out. She wants to engage. She wants to be with people. And the kinds of, kinds of smart home devices that can be there that can help her remember to go to an appointment. Things that can help her not feel nervous if she's running late Those kind of things that are going to help her stay engaged outside of the home. There is so much promise in this and thank you so much to both of you for coming to talk about it. We are going to take a short break and we are going to bring three more experts working in this phase and we are going to continue to talk about how we get the numbers and the information that matters. Thank you very Much. [MUSIC] Hi I'm Lindsey Turrentine with CNet, and we are back to continue our conversation about health and technology in the home. Joining me now are Colin Lawlor, CEO of ResMed, a consumer sleep Doctor Ted Smith of Revlon, CEO. And Rick Valencia the president of Qualcomm Life. And we have a lot to talk about in a short period of time. Let's talk about how, really technically, and let's talk about the technology behind gathering the data that we were talking about earlier in the segment. There's so much exciting development going on right now in Both treating people at home and getting the information that we need to treat them. And I want to start with you and talk about Fallcom a little bit and the really exciting work that you're doing with Exprise and the tricorder. I know you're looking way into the future. How do you think about accurately gathering data that's actionable So what we're doing is we've been focused on building the Internet of medical things. We see a time in the very near future where to manage a patient's care better, we're gonna need to manage it continuously. In the hospital, in the home, and everywhere in between. So we've been building this network that helps us capture this data from patients, wherever they happen to be, It makes the devices that they use to manage, typically a chronic condition or maybe they've recently been discharged from the hospital and they're in a sensitive period. We want to help their caregivers better manage their care. And so we've worked with medical device manufacturers of all sorts, plus pharmaceutical companies, plus provider organizations. To get these devices, not only connected but also working interpretively. They weren't really designed to work together. And typically, a patient with a chronic condition isn't using just one specific device in an island, they're working with multiple medical devices and they need to work together and they need to send a single stream of data that's meaningful to a doctor. So, that's what where Primarily focused on and our partners are typically the service companies that deliver on the care and they are the ones that we deliver up to data in a meaningful way and they're the ones that presented to the patients, so the patient can act on that data without having to worry about multiple screens, multiple logins, multiple issues that they have to So you're talking about, for instance, somebody who's diabetic and having their blood monitor and their insulin pumps talk to each other and then integrate that data in a meaningful way. Exactly right. So that when they get information it's not a flood they have to sift through. Exactly right, and they may also have a CPAP at home. And typically there are these patients. Sleep isn't in isolation. They have sleep issues because of a chronic condition. Or they may have a chronic condition because of their sleep issues. So having that data, having it come together in one stream and having our partners very quickly able to connect with these other companies and their medical devices and that stream of data is what Qualcomm is all about. That's what we Called the internet of medical things. Getting all these devices connected, so that doctors can manage their patients wherever they happen to be, not necessarily just in the hospital or in the doctor's office. That makes sense. So Colin, you, CPAP came up, you're working on. Tell us a little bit about what you're doing, and you're working on the intersection of that information and products that actually help you sleep better. Yeah. Absolutely, absolutely. So, sleep's a huge issue, a huge health issue. And it's connected to almost every significant chronic disease. And the great thing about technology is we have more and more opportunity to measure sleep and understand it. But up until now it really hasn't been good enough, in terms of the accuracy. And we think that that's The key issue that's available this year on why we decided to announce the launch with Dr. Oz and Pegasus of Sleep Score Labs. So we developed a technology which is truly reliable and precise, that enables you to objectively understand your own sleep. But if we can also use that to help companies in the $58 billion sleep aids market Evaluate which products work, and which ones don't. And there's a whole gap in that area, and we're setting out to make a big difference. But at the heart of it, it's not just data, it's about accurate data. Because in the system we've all generated a lot of data for the last number of years. But particularly with sleep, inaccurate data is a big problem, and that's something that we need to do a lot about. So, we're delighted to announce that today. So as I've been talking to all of you backstage, there's been this, actually, an undercurrent of concern about inaccurate data. Ted, this is something you probably think about a lot based on what you do. Why don't you explain a little bit about what you're thinking about as you're designing apps to help streamline this. Sure, so Revon Systems is very much focused on Helping us all make that shift from sort of fitness, sort of lighter weight understandings of health and wellbeing, which are great in those categories, but are different than your experience with the hospital. They're different than having clinically valuable information that can really change How long you live, the quality of your productive years, right? These are serious matters, and they really do require a little more rigor, a little better data. And so, Rebound is very much focused on how can we establish the quid pro quo from these patients. Because everybody has the great idea that people should just donate their data to a clinical trial, or donate their data. I mean, guess what, everybody else has something else to do today. Than that. So we're focus on To help something back after we give away our information. So if I give away my blood sugar I get something out of it. [UNKNOWN] I'm not delivering some value immediately to the patient, in our case we develop machine learning algorithms to help them determine how serious their systems are when they short of breath And that's actually helping them. It's helping us because they're contributing those data insights, we're getting high quality data. But we're in return handing them actionable information, relieving anxiety. The kinds of things that you're talking about when you talk about smart homes, like my life is better for this stuff. Right. We need to do that in health care. We don't need to study people on a petri dish. We need to help them have better lives and I think we're all committed to that kind of a business. I've heard everybody complain a little bit about the accuracy of the data that we collect through consumer devices, right. How far out do you think we are from getting, all having wearables or sensors in our homes, like in our beds? That are Ready. We have them today. It's really a matter of how we integrate them and how we treat that data once we receive it. Now there are different levels of quality. Certain devices were made as consumer devices and they weren't intended to be real medical devices. But medical grade quality devices is what This group here is primarily focused on. And probably the biggest challenge is patient association, making sure you know that it came from a very specific patient. Cause the doctors not gonna be going to act and tell that person to do anything differently unless they're absolutely certain. That in context, what is that person doing when that reading is being taken. But in terms of data accuracy, I think the really big challenge beyond those two, is that once the data's received, how do you treat that? How do you, what do you run that data against? The algorithms that come and give you an actionable insight as a clinician providing care, or as a patient who can take that on themself. Manageable and I don't think it's an issue of the technology is not there. I think it's a matter of again how we integrate that technology and make that data more meaningful, not through the next generation of technology, but through Through insights that we have already today. I think we have clearly two major challenges. Its true that some data is very reliable. Generally speaking if you have a blood pressure monitor or a blood glucose monitor, that data from that is reliable. And generally if you're active and you're using a device to help you count your steps, that's reliable. Well there's a lot of other areas where the data isn't reliable and sleep is obviously something we're greatly concerned about. We see the delta between devices which are poor and devices which are good overestimates people's sleep by between an hour and an hour and a half. That's the difference between you got chronic insomnia or you're perfectly normal. And that's not good enough. So we think we gotta do both. So we've set out to solve the accuracy problem first, but we've also coupled it with sophisticated personalized coaching engines to help people to know what to do with the data, what changes in their lifestyle, what changes in their activity and their daily lives can help improve it. And I think both are important. And particularly when we're talking about serious issues. We've really got to make sure that the data is robust. SleepScore Labs is about doing that. So we have just about a minute left, but I want to ask each, and, maybe Ted. How far out do you think we are in terms of, this is a, it's a hard question but, how many years until most people Feel like they trust the devices that they're using in their home and that they keep with it because we know that when people have trackers, they use different devices, they often just ditch it. How long do you think it's gonna take? Well, so I'm not going to answer your question with a number cuz this is being recorded. But I think the inflection point. [INAUDIBLE] Has been this shift towards your device is completely passive. Right? It sits on the nightstand. So I didn't ask you to strap anything on, remember to charge it, all that. You guys revolutionized the industry with a lot of passive bluetooth, just siphoning and sucking the data, right? And that's the change. So when I had used my Amazon Echo at home I'm delighted that I don't have to do anything, right? And as that continues, I think you're gonna see the healthcare use cases materialize immediately. The friction is in all the stuff the way it was originally conceived. But we all know people don't want to have extra stuff, really. They don't want to think it, set it, forget it That's really where we're going. So we're here today, we just haven't caught up with the vendor community that's making this stuff. Generally if you think about it, if you think about even your phone. When you think of your phone as technology usually it's because it's the problem. It's an experience that you're really looking for in that phone, in everything else you do. And healthcare the same thing. So I'll go back to a point you made earlier, and that is I think we'll get there when the payoff is big enough. And the payoff unfortunately isn't big enough today to tell a patient that if you keep doing what you're doing, you're going to die sooner and that's so good that it's got to be more immediate. And it could be in the form of an experience, but it could be in the form of cash. We have a program with UnitedHealthcare were people can earn $50,100 a year. Towards their health cost if they're just active. Yeah, that's right. We're gonna have to wrap it up. I could talk about this for a very long time so I'm sorry that we have to say goodbye but thank you so much for joining us here and thank you to all of our guests on this panel. Still much more to come here on the cnet stage live in Las Vegas, next up. We are going to have a lot more exciting programming including Nvidia, who's here now. Thank you very much. Thank you. [APPLAUSE] [MUSIC]

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