Ep. 1308: Where we sweat it out with Sphere

Culture
-All right everybody, what's up? How you doing? Great. Awesome. Welcome to The 404 Show on this Friday, July 26th, 2013. I'm Jeff Bakalar. -I'm Justin Yu. -I'm Ariel Nunez. -Welcome to the program on the show today. It wouldn't be a Friday in July without Sphere in the studio. -Hey, hey. -What's up Mr. Guttenberg? -I'm very round. -You're very round. You're very spherical. -You know, maybe this has become huge. -No. After all these years, I am not. -Is it time for a change? -No. I'm not gonna throw away all those-- all those shows calling you Sphere just to one day-- -You know-- -You feel like a cube. Sorry, it doesn't work like that. What's up, man? -Sometimes you feel like-- -Yeah. Say. You were gonna say it. How you doing, dude? What's up? -I'm good. -Yeah? -Yeah. -How you been? -I love the summer. -You do? -Because, you know, we talked about this last time. You were like addicted to air conditioning. -Yeah. -Yeah. -And I'm addicted to not using air conditioning. -Oh. You're one of those people-- we were just talking about people like you yesterday-- -Yeah. -that brag about not using the air conditioning. -Oh yes, great. -But you love fan though, right? You're not-- -I do a fan. Yeah. -Yes. See, don't-- your-- don't start this. Okay? -Yeah. -Because-- -Why not? -'Cause there's no way-- -Sweating is good. -Yeah, it's awesome. -There's no way-- -For other people, but-- -There's no way-- -Yeah. -2 weeks ago when it was consistently-- -2 weeks ago, I was using it, but the days that it was higher, it was like-- -When it was-- it was above 100 for like 4 days straight. -Yeah, yeah, yeah. -You were cool with that. -No, not-- No, no. But 2 of those 4 days I did use the air condition at night. -Oh, so you have it? -I do have air conditioner. I never use it. -What the hell is wrong with you, man? Don't you have-- -I'm green. I don't wanna waste that energy. -Oh, yeah, right. -Oh, so is that cost thing or is it an energy? -It's a-- I'm a cheap-- -You're not cheap. You're not cheap. You buy 15,000-dollar-- -I don't like it. -speakers. -I don't like it. -You-- There's no-- Isn't it better for your equipment to be in a cooler environment than a sweltering crap? -The way it was-- what was going-- -The equipment can fend for itself. -Yeah. Really? It's own its own? -Yeah. -Yeah? All right, I don't get it, man. You're gonna wither away to nothing, dude. You gotta start enjoying the cool life. -I can understand if maybe-- -Even in December. -Yeah. -When you turn the air conditioner on, it kinda dries out the room a little bit-- -Yeah. Dries it out. -and then it creates sinus issues and things like that. -I think it's like stuffed in there. -Yeah, but it's worth it though. -You just try it once before-- -Steve, it blows my mind. I mean-- -Yeah. -I don't wanna make an old joke here, but-- -You can always have the air conditioning. -Yeah. Is that what it's coming down to like were you around before it? -Yeah. Before it was invented. -No, you weren't. Come on, you're not that old. -I crank the air conditioner up so much when I go to sleep after I wear hoodie and socks. Do you guys do that? -That's-- -Because I love just being really cold when I go to bed. -See, that's overkill. -I know. But if I'm gonna do it, I wanna go crazy. -Yeah, do it. -I mean, you-- it's not like air conditioning-- -It's freezing in my apartment. -Air conditioning is not supposed to bring you into a different season. It's just-- -Right. -supposed to like make where you are tolerable. -You know what it is? So, when I was kid, I worked in the supermarket for a while. -In the freezer section? -And I was in the-- not in the freezer section. -You were in the freezer. -Yeah. -In the freezer. -You were handling like frozen meats. -Yeah, I handle frozen food. -Yeah. -And I had to go into the big freezer where all the stuff thawed and, you know, put it on a cart and take it out to this-- you know, put it in-- -Right. -in a case. -Uh-huh. -And that just scarred you for life. -In this particular supermarket, 'cause it was the '60s after all, wasn't the air conditioning. -Right. -So, I was in this freezer that was literally like 2 degrees and then I opened the door and I would be in the store-- -Right. -where it would be 80 degrees. -Uh-huh. -And I had this big fur coat that I would wear when I would go in there. -Nice. -Take off as I came out. -But with nothing underneath. -Yeah. -But maybe that was like the scarred-- -I dunno, man. It sounds like a great job. -That was a long time ago. -I just-- I need to be freezing. I need-- I don't enjoy being so cold where I'm shivering and can't-- but I need to be cold enough to be-- -Just above the-- -Yeah, I just need to be a little cold. Yeah, Exactly. -You're chilling. -I need to be chilling, man. -Did people smell more back then because of like that lack of air conditioning-- -You know, if you think back-- -like universal air conditioning. -before there was like indoor plumbing,-- -Yeah. -everyone smells. -Wait, I can't think back to that. Neither can you. -Not personally. -Yeah. -Neither can I. -Yeah. -But there was a time before most people had plumbing, right? -Right. I guess. Yeah, sure. -And people just didn't bathe. -They didn't. They're like, look-- -They didn't bathe. They waited for hot, you know,-- -Rain. -rain or-- -Yeah, they waited for that, to come across a lake or a hot-- -Or they jump in some water. -Yeah, that's-- -So, everyone smell-- -And you know what? Because I've read books about this, when everyone smelled, they didn't make a big deal that people smell because it was just-- -It was normal. -the normal thing. It's why people don't smell themselves. It's like why homeless people on the subway, they probably don't smell themselves. -It's called going nose deaf. It's about a 12. -Yeah. Okay. -Yeah. You've gone nose deaf, sir. -All right. -You have no idea-- like there's a kid in my locker room-- -It just becomes the norm. -Yeah. You're just nose deaf because his equipment smells so bad he's like so used to it. -When I first started making contact lenses, you know that was one of my career-- -What the-- When the hell did you do that? When? -I cannot do-- -He said that like we knew that. -Oh, I thought I told you that. -I learned 2 things today. I learned you worked in a grocery store and I learned-- -Yeah. -you manufactured contact lenses. -My first real job was making hard contact lenses. -Hard contact-- -Before they were soft contact lenses-- -Yeah, I remember the hard ones. They were smaller than soft contact lenses. -You know-- Yeah, definitely smaller. -Okay. Go on. -So, when I first entered this place, it was like a store front, but it was a factory. -Uh-huh. -The very first thing I noticed was this chemical smell of the chemicals they used to polish the plastic to make the lenses. And after I worked there for a while, I realized I no longer smell that chemical because I smelled it 8, 10 hours a day everyday. -Uh-huh. -After a while, this became the norm-- -Exactly. -and I didn't-- They use some different chemicals now, same stuff. You're just used to it. That's all. -Were you so scarred by that experience that you then swore off contacts forever, which is now why you're wearing glasses? I feel like every job you've learned something. -That's a longer story. -That's good. -Yeah. -It's a-- -Your lifelong learning. -It's a long story about that contact lens, you know. -Uh-huh. -But can I just say one thing about this? -Yeah. Go for it. -My contact lens broke. When I worked for this guy who was crazy adventuring type and he was one of the many people working on contact lenses that would change the color of your eyes. -Uh-huh. -Yeah. -And he just had this dream of doing it and he kept like, you know, thinking out ways of doing it. He eventually found a guy to invest millions of dollars into his company. -Yeah. -And then I became the guy in this company because it went from me being the only employee to having 30 or 40 employees. -Oh wow. -And my job was teaching people how to make contacts. -And when was this? Because I know you've had a crazy long career being a projectionist too. -Yeah. That was later. This was in`68. -How old are you? -1969. -No, I'm kidding. That's amazing. -You've done a lot of stuff. -Sharon says they wanna see your resume one day. -Yeah. -All right. -Can you-- Do you have like a one-- a current one handy? -I don't know what occurs that far back. -Yeah. All right. Well, I still wanna see it one day. Compile it for us please. -Yeah. -I will do it. -Before we get to more of your stuff, we have to do a little update on our contest 'cause we still haven't picked a winner. Well, we have picked a winner and here she never responded. So, there's someone out there sitting on $404. -Uh-huh. -Wow. -Just letting it simmer -It's accruing. -Yeah. -It's not accruing anything. It's accruing dust. -If no one takes it, we're just gonna take ourselves out to dinner-- -Well, not-- -or put it back into the show some-- -Right. -Maybe it could be four 101 winner. -Maybe. But that was such a weird thing to say. But yeah, I don't know. So apparently, we've picked 2 winners. -Uh-huh. -And the first one didn't even respond. -Right. -The second one, we're waiting for. And each time we alert someone, they have 48 hours to respond. -Yeah. Check your e-mail. -Check your freaking e-mails, guys. I mean, it's probably not someone who pays-- who pays attention to the show. -We're just joking. I mean, we're not gonna take it back ourselves between all the entries that we got. -Of course not. -Of course, we're gonna find-- -No, there were like literally thousands of entries. -Check your e-mails. -So, we have to wait for someone to claim it. So, yeah, I dunno. That's why we haven't announced the winner. -Wow. -'Cause we did promise people we were gonna do that on the show on Tuesday. -Yeah. -Give him a little more time. -Yeah, you know. -So, can you say their name now? -No. We don't have the information. It's being done by-- -Oh. -an internal separate part. -Yeah. -So anyway, that's the update on that. -Speaking of contests though, don't you have your own contest going on right now? -I have a contest. -Tell us about that. -And you know what? It might be worth more than 404. -Okay. So, you're just gonna wanna up us. That's why. -Well, in some way. -Okay. -Because what it is is I'm gonna allow one of my readers to be the Audiophiliac for the day. -Woah. -I wanna turn over my blog. -Really? You're gonna just-- -Unlocking-- -You're gonna give them-- you're gonna give them the keys to the castle. -The keys to the castle. Give them that soap box and make them spew whatever stuff they want. -And-- -Of course, I'm gonna pick the winner. -Right. -So, I'm asking people to write some sort of think piece basically, not a product review. -Yeah. -Anything about audio, music, sound. -Uh-huh. -The things that I write about. -Right. -They can be against the things that I write about. They can't really-- They shouldn't really be mocking me because that will be kind of weird. -Right. And you would probably not have a good chance of winning. -But it could be-- it could be an opposing view from that that I have. -Uh-huh. -Right. -So, the deadline for entries is August 12th. -Oh, so they got some time. -They got some time to write something really good. And I have a bunch now and I have some strong ones, but there's definitely room for something better. -Have you cleared this with the higher ups? Is this-- -Oh yeah. -Is this okay? -This is okay. -'Cause you're just gonna hand over the-- you know, the reins to someone. -Well, it's gonna be edited. I'm gonna do an introduction. -Yeah. -All right. -But, you know, all those-- all those commentors and I've got lots of them. -Yeah. What are some good entries? Like what are some topics people are talking about? Is it all headphone stuff or-- -Some of them is like their first high 5s. -Uh-huh. -You know, some of them is like music sucks and-- -Music sucks. -That's a good platform. -Yeah. -All right, cool. -But, you know, there's some good ones. So, I think it'll be great if I heard from a kid, whatever that means, about their-- -I think it's pretty well defined. -Well, no. It could be a 30-year-old kid. -Oh okay. Thanks. -It's all relative. -Yeah. -So, about their high 5, their first high 5, and how they fell in love with music-- -Sure. -or how they fell out of love with music. Something, you know-- Something original. -Oh yeah. -Originality is probably the most important thing. -You had some original stuff the other day that I really like, the thing with MTV, right? -Yeah. The MTV thing. -What was that about? -It was that on July 4, MTV returned to an all-music form-- -Uh-huh. -for 12 hours. -I bet you show-- -6 a.m. to 6 p.m. -Yeah. -I bet you show that logo to kids and they're just like, what the hell is that? -MTV? What's that? Or what's the M stands? -It's weird, right? -Uh-huh. -Now, here's the thing that I think is amazing about this missile of entry. -And they did this? -And they did it, yeah. They did it. But they didn't-- they didn't do it like they did it then. The thing about MTV in the early days was that there were VJs, the equivalent of DJs. -Right. -Video jockey. -Yeah, video jockey. And they talked up the song and they had things to say about the song. -Uh-huh. -And somebody, whether it's the VJ or somebody, was programming the songs. -Right. -So, yes, you can see any music you want on YouTube, but if it's not being-- -Curated. -curated,-- -Yeah. -it's not really the same thing. -No, of course not. It's not. -So, it's lost on the why MTV or something like that. Can't have a show that's the equivalent of it. And for today's music-- -Well, not even a show like just have a channel that does it. There's not a channel-- -I'm not even asking for a channel. -No, but the channel-- -I'm saying a 1-hour show a week or something. -All you gotta do is like set it on autopilot with 1 guy there-- -Uh-huh. -and/or girl, whatever it is, and rock and roll. And I mean, it's-- I would watch it every now and then if it was a-- if it was a genre that I was into and if they didn't play, you know, just the-- -Or you have like a famous musician-- -Sure. -play the things that he likes-- -Yeah. I would watch that. -or she likes-- -Yeah. -and why they like it. -They used to do that. They used to do-- They would have like how someone could become an Audiophiliac for the day. They would have like musicians coming and be VJs for the day. -Yeah. -Yeah, I remember that. -So, it's not like it's irrelevant because there's such a thing as YouTube. -But the-- -That doesn't make it irrelevant. You know, there's such a thing as cool radio station still that have interesting DJs that say things that are interesting. -Right. -instead of just being-- -Or you can hear anything you want and anything-- -Well, right. -Well, you know what it is? -Well, it does indicate the other. -Yeah. -You know what it is now? -It's all these blogs and websites. -Uh-huh. -They're curating stuff and there's so many different types now-- -Yeah. -whereas before it's like you only look at the TV and radio to discover new music. -Right. That's true. -Now, you got the internet where you could discover something that's very specific. -Sure. True. -And MTV was very broad because it was so brand new. -Yeah. -You know what I mean? -All right. -So, you got curators still, but they're just not on TV anymore. -And it's not presented in the style of the VJ music video format. -It's all just promotion on TV now. -Yeah. -It's not like you're curating something special for your viewers,-- -Right. Right. -you know. -And the music video has changed so much too. -Yeah. -And I watched some on July 4th. -Yeah. Were they showing-- -You know, it frustrates-- -old ones or they're showing new ones? -It showed mostly new ones. -Okay. That's awful. -But the thing that I don't understand-- I never understood about the music video concept is that it's basically a silent movie with a sound. -Uh-huh. -Yeah. And never like a band or rarely a band actually playing or making-- -No. -mouthing that they're playing or something. -Right. -That just seemed like such a stilted way of doing it and that became the dominant thing of what a music video is. -Well, I mean, you know, look at like what the Aerosmith videos used to do. They would like tell this little story with Alicia Silverstone, you know. -Uh-huh. -And there was one where she went bungee jumping with her belly ring. Is that what they were implying? -I don't remember that, eww. -You don't remember that? -No. -You don't know what I'm talking about? -No. -You guys-- -They tied it to her bellybutton. -There was like a video called-- I think it's for like Amazing, or Crazy, or one of those things-- -Huh. -and she-- you know how she was in all the Aerosmith-- -Right. -music video? -Uh-huh. -So, there was one-- I mean, they would tell these crazy stories. -I always thought it was kinda weird when they had the band playing live because they're basically lip synching-- -Yeah. -and fake playing the instruments-- -Right. -'cause it was always the track that appeared on the record, right, not like this live thing they had recorded. -So, here's a crazy thing. What if they actually-- -That would be cool. -play? -Yeah. -You know, there's this-- -That's called a concert. -There was this-- No, no, no. There was this British show called From the Basement,-- -Okay. -which would be a band actually playing in a basement. -Yeah. -Like nothing in there except the band and their equipment and stuff. -Uh-huh. -Yeah. -It was great. -Yeah. That sounds good. -Again, you know, when you actually see people really doing it. The whole idea is that's supposed to be exciting. -Well, there's some cool stuff on the-- there's some cool stuff on the internet like live like JBTV. Ever watched that? -Yeah. -JBTV is out in Chicago, I think. -Uh-huh. -And it's just-- it's like it started out as like a public access sort of thing. -Yeah. A lot of-- A lot of public radio stations do that like KCRW has Morning Becomes Eclectic. -Right. -You know, they invite people to come in and play acoustic stuff. -And that's cool. I dig that. -Yeah. -You know, they're like this variety show with bands and what not. -Like Daytrotter sessions. -Yeah. -A couple of years ago, I did a story about NYC in New York. They don't do it quite this way anymore, but everyday they had a live concert-- -Uh-huh. -at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. -That's awesome. -That's right. -I went to the studio where they were doing it. -Yeah. -They did it every single day live-- I don't mean like recorded and they played. I mean live on the air. -Yeah. -Broadcasting on-- -That's pretty sick. -Cool. We should do that for our show. -Yeah. You don't get that too much anymore. -Yeah. -You know what I miss is MTV Unplugged. I think they should bring that back. -That was fun. -I love that. -I'm pretty sure they still do it. -There was so many great-- -I'm pretty sure they still do it and then it goes on Palladium. You know that chart Palladium? Ain't a bad channel. -Yeah. Yeah. -There's about like 20 to 30 percent good stuff on there. -Yeah. -Yeah. That was a lot of great compile. -Yeah, for sure. -So, by the way, the other reason I wanted to ask you about with this MTV thing is that my blog did amazing numbers. -Sure. -And you saw it on-- -On reddit. You appealed to a generation that had never heard of you before. -Is that it? -No, I don't know. I'm joking, but-- So, what is reddit? 'Cause I think reddit was a big deal-- -Yeah. -in making-- -That is so, what? -Right. We didn't even say. So, that story you put up, it was called I Want My MTV Again,-- -Right. -which is from a Dire Strait song. -Right on. I Want My MTV. -Which is-- that's a great song, great band. -Yeah. It made the front page of reddit-- -Oh wow. -that day. -Congratulations. -So, that's a big deal. -Yeah. Now, it's explaining what reddit-- -How do I do it again? -What does that mean? -Yeah. -Well, look, it's sort of like a crap shoot. You know, you can just kind of-- the stars gotta line up and you gotta be in the right place, right time sort of situation. -Right. -Uh-huh. -But what reddit is-- Oh man, it's like the first time I'm explaining reddit to somebody. -Okay. -I'll take a crack at it. -Yeah. Go for it. -Reddit is just a community of people that submit and review links from around the internet and the community votes-- they vote on stories and the front page displays the stories, and links, and images, and crap that get the most votes. -Uh-huh. -And the good stuff rises to the top. -But their-- -And when you go to reddit.com, that's what you see. You see the first 50 things that are the current favorite things on the internet right now. -So, how can I get plugged on reddit? -Well, that's the thing. You can't. And that's why it's so good because there is no sort of-- -You're not allowed to post the link that-- -Right. -that goes to a website that you've made yourself. -Well, that's not it. That's way technical. -So that's-- Well, that's the rule so that's why it kinda keeps it-- -Genuine. -keeps it fair. -Sure. -Yeah. -So, there is no-- there is no advantages. There is no compromising. -Okay. -Anytime that something like that happens, they're pretty vigilant at, you know, exterminating that sort of issue. So, the thing is is like you-- I mean, I think it's okay to submit-- for you to submit something to reddit that you wrote. I think that's okay. -But how do I do that? -Well, you gotta get an account. -Oh. -So, you gotta make an account and, you know, there's a 404 subreddit too. -Uh-huh. -So, what you're seeing on the front page, this is like-- this isn't that painful. What you're seeing-- What you're seeing on the front page-- -Yeah. -are little links that are submitted from a whole variety of subreddits. -Look, we have the 404 subreddit page here, which is basically just subtopics. -Right. -And they have every topic here to think of to discuss on the internet. -So, you could actually make an Audiophiliac subreddit and it's a great way to interact with people that read your blog. -Right. -So, what we're looking at here is like the stuff that people submit to our mini little subreddit. -They think it's relevant to our show. -And then everything sort of gets filtered into the front page in a weird way. -Yeah. -So there you have it. -I'll work on that. -I-- Just go and make an account and play around and you'll figure it out. -Okay. -All right, you're not-- you're savvy enough. -Look at my-- My freaking Twitter thing is like rocking. -Your freaking Twitter thing is all over the place. -I'm almost tied up to you. -Are you now? -Yeah. -Nice. What are you at? -Like almost 6,000. -Nice man. Good. I hope you dethrone me. -Yeah. It is called Adam Audiophiliac Man. -Wow. So, have you seen like a recent jump lately or is it something like you did specifically-- -In my overall number? -Yeah. Because you seem-- -Yeah. -you seem-- -I worked it really hard. -Yeah? -Yeah. -So, you work at it? Is it really? Are you getting paid as to how many followers you have? -Oh, no, no, but I use-- I use-- -Twitter a lot. -Twitter to promote myself. -Sure. Sure. -I see it on that. -Rock and roll, man. -It's awesome. -Excellent. Excellent job, sir. -Yeah. So, what else you got for us here? -So, the other blog I did recently about all this stuff was why didn't digital kill the LP? You know, it's a very complicated story and I-- and I believe that it is. -When you say LP, you mean like a record. -Vinyl record. -Yeah. -Right. So, yeah, it didn't kill it, but it really beat it up, took its money, and spit on it. -And here's the interesting thing, it's 30 years since the CD was inked and the LP sales, you know, dipped and now they've come up. People cite numbers-- -They're outselling CDs? -No. Of course not. But the thing-- Don't be hung up-- so hung up on the numbers. -I'm not. -I'll tell you what. Because there's no other example that I can come up with of the dead format, surviving in a way that-- it is not just a nostalgia thing. If you go to that store, that music store on 4th Street called Other Music,-- -Yeah. -Uh-huh. -I would say a quarter of the space in that store is vinyl. -Right. -And it's not Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. It's new bands putting their music out on vinyl. So, it's not-- The primary thing that's happening in vinyl isn't nostalgia. It's young bands, new bands using vinyl. So, the thing with this way, it's 30 years since the CD came out and LP is still going strong. -Other formats like laser disc, cassette, mini disc, VHS, nobody is putting out new titles on those formats. -Right. -Vinyl is the only old format that should have been replaced that's still growing. -Uh-huh. -That's kind of unprecedented. -Yeah. It's weird. -I feel like people attach themselves to vinyl still because there's a rarity to it. You know, the fact that it-- -It's physical. -is one of the oldest things. I mean, CD is physical too, but they manufactured so many more copies-- -Right. -of a CD compared to the records-- -Yeah. -especially now, you know, the more time passes, the less LPs there are. -Uh-huh. -Maybe that's why people like to get a hold of something that others can't necessarily get easily. -Yeah. -And I also think that- -And you know what else is really interesting? -Yeah. -So, people always bring up these minuscule numbers. It's, you know, 3 million or 5 million, not all LPs that are sold are sound scanned, which is how they come up with those. -Right. -But the thing, I think, is so interesting is that they're more profitable than selling other things. And the Black Keys said recently that one LP sale is equal to hundreds of thousands of Spotify screams in their income. -Okay. -So, it may not be gigantic numbers in the millions, but in terms of the money that a band makes, it actually can be a very significant number. -All right. I believe that. It makes sense. -You say that-- saying yes, but you sound like you don't really believe it. -No, I believe it, I just-- you know, it's still-- you know, and I understand why it has this undying popularity. -Someone has a hit. I went to the New Music seminar and this-- and this guy from this indie label said, "I had, you know, a hundred million Spotify players." -Uh-huh. -"It didn't really amount to that much money. It's not like-- So, when you win-- -I know. And you hit Spotify-- -and millions of people are hearing your music, it doesn't make you any money. They didn't have to spend money to make-- -But there's also-- there's other value and people listening. -Yes, I know. It promotes your concerts-- -And it's-- No, and that's true because-- -But the second that you-- your band breaks up or dies in a car crash or something happens, there's no more money. -Right. -You pay or you don't make any money. -But they're dead so who cares. -All right, bad example. -No, but I understand what you're saying and I think-- I think back to the point of like why is vinyl still a thing, I think a lot of it is that it also has enjoy this like renaissance, this sort of-- You know, it's trendy. There's a part of that and, yeah, maybe it's not trendy for the right reasons, but I think there's-- -Oh, for sure it is. -The sound quality really is great if you have a proper player and a proper amp-- -True. -and system. -Uh-huh. -And you know, if there's an aesthetic to it that I think for whatever reason clicks with a new generation of people who listen to music. -Right. And that's the part that's unprecedented. -Right. For sure. -I mean, well, there's other things that like come back into popularity like you guys will-- you guys will point in that, but like pinball is sort of coming back. -Yeah. -There's-- I know a lot of people that collect casette tapes too. -That's-- -Audio casette tapes. -No one's releasing-- -Not VHS. -New ones. -5 people every week. -Right. -I'm talking about something that is actually showing signs of-- -It's becoming almost universal. -It's not just-- See, that's nostalgia. What I'm talking about isn't nostalgia. -Uh-huh. -It's a current thing that's happening. -Well, you know, there's a lot-- like every other person is a DJ now. -Yeah. -And DJs have to have vinyl. You have to have at least a little-- like at least a creative vinyl-- -Yeah. -you know, 'cause the whole-- I mean, there's Serato now that DJs use, but it's all based on the format of 2 turntables-- -Right. -and a mixer. -Whether or not there's actual records I'm-- -Yeah, but when you switch out from DJ's DJ, you have to play vinyl-- -Right. -'cause you need to take the Serato record off into vinyl,-- -Yeah. -you know. -It's a good point. Even Serato you actually technically need to play a record. It's not an audio record, but-- -Uh-huh. -you know, it's something that you have to put on a turntable. -Exactly. -to require the-- -Though you're still doing the act of putting-- -You need to-- -off on vinyl,-- -Correct. -you know. -But on top of that is like you're not gonna get respect from other DJs if you don't own vinyl either. -Sure. -You know, if you're a new DJ, you need to go back and get the classics-- -Right. You gotta do-- -on vinyl. -your homework. -A real-- No DJ is gonna respect-- -Yeah. -but that would change soon, you know. I dunno. -I think it's also that records obviously sound much, much better than digital music if-- -Uh-huh. -for people like yourself. -Some people think so. I think-- -Let's-- as well. -I won't say it's universal, but a lot of people-- -Yeah. -I mean, you don't have to be an audiophiliac to tell that a record sounds much better than an mp3 so maybe if people that care about fidelity-- -Right. That's the part of it too. -I just bust him by now. -Yeah? -Yeah. Yeah, there's this new record label called Cherries Records. It's actually a friend of mine, and they're from Chicago. They put out a bunch of boogie and all the music they put out is on vinyl. -Uh-uh. -On 7 inches and mp3. So, it's like the two extremes. It's just vinyl or mp3s. -Feet Master wants to know, REL, how many DJs do you think really go with vinyl nowadays and not a CD MIDI controller? -In hip-hop? Everybody. Every hip-hop DJ has vinyl-- -Yeah. -because they all use Serato, but if it's like house or something, they're more on like CD DJs and stuff like that. -Right and like yeah. -Uh-huh. -Interesting. -And I mean-- Oh, I mean not every DJ, but if you want respect as a hip-hop DJ, you gotta-- you have to use vinyl. -Right. -You must. -I feel like people and-- -And they sample it too. They sample vinyl stuff. -And someone on the chatroom was also saying like DJs show up to gigs with their MacBooks and that's it. -Yeah. -But sometimes they use-- -Yeah, some could use vinyl in conjunction with that. -I mean, if you're like Diplo or something like that and you're a big touring DJ, you don't have to show up with vinyl 'cause you're Diplo. -Right. -You know what I mean? But if you're a new young guy and you're trying to prove yourself,-- -Sure. Yeah. -you gotta have a crate, man. -You gotta start from the bottom. -You gotta have something. -I feel like the mentality is that if you can work with as little songs as possible,-- -Uh-huh. -then you probably get real lot of respect from other DJs. You know, the fact that you can put thousands of songs at your fingertips on to a hard drive and then play that on Serato,-- -Uh-huh. -it's a little too easy. -Yes. -You know, like if-- and you're gonna work a crowd, you're gonna try to like mix things around with maybe a crate of records, it's a lot harder than doing it with every single song available. -Yeah. -Right. -For sure. -Right. -Link Blue on the chat says, "I think it's a nostalgia thing for the sound that the record has." -Sure. -I think with that's like crackling sort of-- -Uh-huh. -ambient noise. -Yeah. -I think there is-- there is an aesthetic there that people dig. -It's part of the sound. -That's soothing. -It's part of the sound. -I think people like looking at the album art-- -Oh yeah. -that's extra large like that too. -Yeah. -I dig it, yeah, for sure. I went through-- I was in-- I was in Baltimore a couple of months ago and I went to my buddy's place and he had such a sick, sick collection of vinyl that I was just so blown away 'cause, you know, when you see like Thriller on vinyl,-- -Yeah. -it just is cooler than Thriller on a CD. -Yeah. -If there's not-- There's no doubt about it. It's like, man, which one am I gonna pick to listen to? -Yeah. -I would much rather-- -See, that's the thing. I think they're-- -If there's just more like value there for some reason. -I'm putting thought into which are gonna play-- -Yeah. -as opposed to just playing whatever. -Uh-huh. -I think that in and of itself that you have-- you have think what-- -Yeah. -what am I going to play-- -For sure. -after this-- -You're right. They're-- -that you are involved in that way. -Absolutely. -That's a huge thing. -Yes. Screw it, you know, he had all these like 10 disc changers right all that-- -Yeah. -Uh-huh. -nonsense. -I have a good story that's perfect for this. So, my friend-- I have a friend whose name is DJ Halo and he-- and he-- I kind of followed him-- his whole time-- his whole DJ career, his gig and stuff. So, I used to follow him when DJing was only on vinyl. -Uh-huh. -And he would set up his crates so that he would choose what he's gonna play the night, you know. And then once it's switched to laptops and hard drives, he all of a sudden had so much music to play that when he did his sets, it was all over the place, you know. And it didn't move the crowd anymore, but when he-- when he chose his sets ahead of time, all the music blended well, you know. -Give the thought into it. -Yeah. He had like, okay, all south hip-hip, all-- -'Cause it was-- it was a set. It was a set. -Exactly. -He preplanned it. And when you just run it in there with a hard drive, you just have like a hundred gigs, you found it very easily. I wanna hear this now. I wanna hear this now. -All right. -Do this now. -Yeah. -You're just-- -Sometimes-- I mean just to play Devil's Advocate, sometimes that's kind of cool 'cause if the mood changes or you need-- -Uh-huh. -something at your fingertips, then-- -For sure. -that could be good too. -I guess if you're like a wedding DJ it's cool. -Yeah. -Because you need to kind of be all over the place. -Yeah. -But no. But if you're doing a set like REL talked about with his buddy, Halo, that-- -Yeah. -for sure like it's-- [unk] if you-- -Yeah. -if you're all over the place. -Uh-huh. Yes. -Ariel, do you know this guy, Young Guru? -Yes, I do. -Is he a big deal? -Yeah, I just met him recently. Yeah, he used to tour with Jay-Z. -All right. -Yeah. Yeah. -So, I interviewed him a couple of months ago. -Uh-huh. -And it was like the strangest-- -He's so cool. -thing. -Yeah. He is so cool. Go on, man. -Because he was at NYU. He was doing some kind of thing and some publicist said, "Hey, wanna meet this guy?" First my reaction was, "Huh? Me meet him?" -But I-- But I-- But I hung out with him for like 20 minutes before he did his thing for the students. -Uh-huh. Uh-huh. -And I just came right on and said, "I don't know anything about your music." -Right. Right. -"I don't even know who you are." -Oh my god. -"But, the thing, we just somehow connected-- -Uh-huh. -because we were both really interested in sound." -Right. -And he didn't talk down to me. -I didn't talk down to him. -Uh-huh. -We just connected on that. -Yeah, he's a really cool guy. -Yeah. He's very smart. -Uh-huh. -And we had a great time. And he said for him that record The Low End Theory-- The Low End Theory-- -Oh yeah -Uh-huh. -He said that's what made him. He didn't use the word the audiophile. -Uh-huh. -But that's what it was. -What it was. -Yeah. Yeah. -Because it was the set-- More than the music and stuff, it was the sound of that record-- -Right. -and the sound of the bass on that record-- -Uh-huh. -that really-- He's like 12 years old when he heard it. He was like, that's it. -Right. -It was almost like that's what I'm gonna do with my life when I heard that. -That created-- -It touched him in that way,-- -Right, right, right, right. -you know. -Yeah. -So, on that-- When we were talking about that, we were totally connected,-- -Uh-huh. Uh-huh. -you know. -That's cool. -And you know what I did the next day? I got that record. -Oh nice. -Oh, you bought the record? -Yeah. -Cool. -Because I said how I-- I know I got it a little better, you know. -Yeah, yeah, yeah. Was that the first Tribe Called Quest album that you had gotten? -Yes, the first. -Oh awesome. What you think about it? -I really liked it. -Nice. -Yeah. -A converter. -Yeah. I like it. Because he made it like open to me for sure-- -Yeah. Yeah. For sure. -because he heard it from a sound point of view. -Right. -I heard it from a sound point of view. We were on the same wavelength. -Tribe is actually a great place for you to start into your hip-hip collection-- -Yeah. -because it influences a lot from-- -Right. -jazz. A lot of the samples are from jazz. -Right. Let's produce talent. -Uh-huh. -It makes sense for you. -Right. -That's-- -Look at this. -That's cool. -Every time. -What an eye-opening experience. -Yeah. It's brutal. -Especially 'cause I went in with no expectation. -Yeah. I know. That's like the best possible result you could have had. -Didn't he just release some headphones? -Yeah. -Yeah. I had-- What do you think of those? -I purposely didn't hear-- -That's good. That's right. -Yeah. -Probably-- -That's the safe way to go. -Yeah. Yeah. -And he didn't try to sell them to me. That's gotten me to write about it. -Yeah. Cool. Cool. -But I think I've grown to respect certain types of sound especially having watched things like the Sound City thing. -Uh-huh. -and like you understand, you know, where this-- where amazing sound comes from and how it really is a big difference when you go from recording to recording-- -Right. -and-- -Especially if you have headphones-- -Yeah. -or speakers that are good enough to hear-- -Right. For sure. -That with a headphone or speaker. -Yeah. -But more of that-- -It's crazy. -It's not a little thing. -I've had experiences where I've-- I will listen to something and then so many years later I'll listen to it again on a much better pair of headphones or something-- -Uh-huh. -and you hear stuff-- It sounds like a different band almost-- -Right. -or if you are that careful and that sensitive to music. -Absolutely. -Didn't you just rediscover never mind recently? -Yeah. Like I-- I mean I listen to that record a million times, you know, 21 years ago. -Uh-huh. -And the guy who produced it, Butch Vig,-- -Uh-huh. -and they did it at Sound City and then I started listening to like his other stuff and then I said to myself, man, he sounds-- like I could almost tell like this guy did a record I liked 10 years later and it was true. -Uh-huh. -And just knowing like you can just sort of tell the style and that sort of-- -Right. -boombastic maybe-- -Yeah. -sort of feel like it's amazing. -For sure. -Now, a lot of people can appreciate that especially, you know, some people in this generation who just listen to music off their cellphone speaker. -They're missing,-- -They're missing it. -you know. -They really are. -It's always gonna be there for them to get it later. -Right. -Uh-huh. -But, you know,-- -Like I almost wanted-- -You can buy good stuff really cheap. -I almost wanna go back and like buy a bunch of records on vinyl. -Wow. -You know, like that's where I'm at, you know, where I just wanna do that. -Do have a-- -You know, I did it. It's all right. You know, I just did a kick start of thing a couple of months ago and it's finally coming out. -It's your own kick starter? -No, no. For this company in Massachusetts, it's making 150-dollar turntable,-- -Right. -but it's really good. It's called the Orbit U-Turn. -Okay. And you're totally shilling for them? -I am. -Uh-huh. -Are you an investor from the gecko? -No. -No? 'Cause you gotta disclose this kind of-- -No, I don't. -Yeah. Okay. -Oh well. -But anyway, they're really nice guys. They didn't just throw something together. They really put a lot of work into this thing. -Oh, they-- and they-- -And they're in touch with me and they're very close to sending me one to review. -I'm gonna kill their-- -Oh yeah. -their goal. -Yeah. I think they went like 3 times over. -Oh, they're beautiful too. -Yeah. -They're minimalist. Is it done? -So, what makes this so good? -It's just-- It's just carefully done, you know. -Yeah. -They actually design their own tonearm and stuff. -Right. -They didn't just buy stuff off the shelf and say, "Here you go, here's a cheap turntable." They really try-- -Uh-huh. -to make as good a turntable as they possibly-- -I'd love for you to like come by my parent's place 'cause I think they have 2 turntables. I want you to tell me like how good they are-- -Okay. -and if they're just junk. -Okay. -Can we do that? -Sure. -We'll cook you dinner and stuff. -Okay. Vegetarian. -Really? You're still doing that? -Still. You've been doing that how long now? -A very long time. -Yeah? -Uh-huh. -All right. -More than 25 years. -Whatever works, dude. If you don't want a cheeseburger, that's your problem. -All right. -They're so good. They're delicious. -I heard yesterday in your show. -Oh, that's right. -Hell right, man. -It's like one-- It was like an orgasm. Like a continuing-- -Orgasm. -food orgasm. -Yeah. -What's crazy is like we're getting-- we talked all about that food and then people kept-- we got a few e-mails and we got a few tweets that said, "That's kind of dick that you're talking about food during Ramadan where people are fasting." -Oops. Yeah. -I didn't even know. I thought that was in December. -No. -No. -It's only for a day though. -No, it's a month. -It is? -They know they gotta eat in a month. -They don't eat-- They don't eat during the day-- -Yeah. -when it's-- when it's after 6. -I know a lot about this clearly. Anyway, what else you got for us, man? -So, Amar Bose died. -Who is that? -He is the man that started Bose. -And you couldn't-- and you couldn't be happier? -And I danced. -Oh. -And I danced! It was the first time you danced in 30 years. You now, it's sad. It's said 'cause I-- No, it's sad because Bose-- -Oh man. -Look, as much as people hate Bose, it's an unbelievably-- -Did people hate Bose more than Beats by Dre? -No. -We should have a contest. -No. People hate Beats by Dre more. -We should have another contest. Which is worse? -I hate both. I hate Beats by Dre more. -But people really love Beats by Dre. So, it'd be a great Battle. -I guarantee you Bose are still making more money. -If I can only do that on my blog, I'd love-- -Who do you think-- Who do you think makes more money? -Beats. -Bose System. -I feel like Beats. -Beats is coming up. -Beats is-- -Bose has been around for 30 years. -Bose has more stuff across the whole-- -They're in cars. -market. -I mean, they-- -Yeah, Bose is so much more-- -Cars. -What-- But-- -But anyway, I own Bose speakers-- -Right. -way, way, way, way back. -Uh-huh. -Right. -And then I heard good speakers. -Yeah. -Even then. -And then I heard-- -It was like, uh-oh. -good speakers. -But I, you know-- -You hate Bose. We all know you hate Bose. -No. -There's a few good Bose products. -Yeah. The sound link-- -The headphones, the buds. -Some of the headphones-- The earbuds actually are-- -Earbuds are good. -The sound-canceling headphones are great at blocking out noise. -Uh-huh. -They sound good. -Yeah, but they're great at noise canceling. -Noise canceling, they're phenomenal. -Right. -Right. -Unfortunately, not so good for me. -I-- -Their Bluetooth headphones are really good, the AE2w. -I haven't heard that one. -Really good. -David Carnoy just reviewed them and they're one of our-- -So-- But aside from the quality, right, that seems-- the jury still seems to be out. -Well, there's a couple of nice things to say about it. -Okay. So, let's do that-- -Personally, there was a very-- -before we really just tear 'em down. -It was a very research oriented company. -Yeah. -They really did do a lot of research in various stuff. And he basically gave all of the company's stock to MIT. He was an MIT professor all during the period of him-- -I didn't do that. -running Bose. -So, it comes from a good place. -Yeah. So, he basically gave all of the stock like a few years ago. He gave all of the stock to MIT. -Man, you really send it off for hating this guy, aren't you man? He sounds like freaking-- -No, I'm presenting a balanced picture of someone-- -Sure. -of a company that I don't respect for not making the best possible sound files. -Right. -but it's not like they're totally evil. -You don't hate the man. It's just-- -I don't hate the man. -products. -No. Of course not. I never met him and it's weird 'cause I've met almost everybody-- -Uh-huh. -who is anybody in audio, but-- See, that's the other weird thing about Bose that I always felt is it-- Bose separated itself from the rest of the entire audio industry. He would never be at CES. -Yeah. -I was going to CES. -They were the Apple of audio for-- -Yeah. They said, "We do our own thing. We're not actually part of the audio community",-- -But by doing that-- -which I thought was really weird. -Well, it was weird for sure, but it was very smart from a marketing standpoint because they created their own stigma. -Right. -Stigma? -Yeah. -Well-- -What? Their own reputation. Their own sort of like-- -Reputation. -Better word, their own reputation and make-- and almost kinda created the illusion-- -Yeah. -that they were the superior high-end sort of untouchable audio, man. -For years, they only sold Bose products in Bose Store. -Their own TV too. Did you ever see those Bose infomercials? -Yeah. They're the only ones that actually-- only audio-- only company that advertises in mainstream media. -They were also one of the first audio companies to get a celebrity endorsement too. I mean, that's so common now. -Yeah. Yeah. -Ludacris has his own headphones, 50 Cent. -Yeah. -Who was it? -But they had Herbie Hancock. -Herbie Hancock. -You remember that Herbie Hancock used to do the infomercials and he would just play the piano-- -Uh-huh. -and then it was an advertisement for the Bose Acoustic Wave Speakers. -Right. -And they manufactured this idea that if you had a speaker on one side of the room and played it,-- -Uh-huh. -it would sound like you had-- -A concert hall. -it would come from all over the place. Yeah. -I remember those commercials. -Which is great marketing, you know. If you ever head of Bose-- -That true. -The sound-- Yeah. It doesn't sound like that at all. -No. -But the concept of it, its advertising, I think a lot of people bought into it. -So anyway, it's sort of the end of it though. -How old is he? -83. -All right. Young in there. -He had a good long run. That's a good run. -All right. Do you have any-- -Well, it's enough. -You don't have like a joke like an he'll be buried on those subwoofer? You don't have anything? No jokes like that? -Well, I could tell you-- I could tell you that-- like one of the classic audio jokes. -Okay. -But I have to explain it. -I thought you-- I was like setting you up for like the classic, you know, joke about the sound guy, but-- -No. -let's hear it. -I don't have that one. -Yeah. -So anyway-- So, he's Amar Bose. And his thing-- his initial thesis was that sound, when you hear it in a concert hall or any public place, you're hearing the sound reflecting around the room-- -Sure. -more than the actual sound of the instrument. Okay. So, Bose speakers had drivers facing away from the listener-- -Oh. -and reflecting off the wall. -Right. -It would sound direct then reflecting. So, it was called direct reflecting speaker. -Okay. -That was his concept. -Uh-huh. -And then there was this guy called Paul Klipsch who was like a really big mover in horn speakers like the kind that you use then in concerts and stuff that's basically a horn that projects sound quality. -Yeah. -Okay. -Right? So, the classic audio joke is that Amar Bose and Paul Klipsch ran into each other at a CES and Paul Klipsch goes, "Hey Amar, how you doing?" And Amar Bose goes, "Great and you?" -So, that didn't really work for people who can't see what you did. -I turned away. -Well, you turned away and the first guy made a noise with his mouth there. That's pretty good. That's pretty fun. -It's audio joke. -That was. Did anyone-- -That's the beginning-- -Did anyone like-- -People would fall down laughing. -Yeah? They got it there? -Serious. -Oh, 'cause he was super witty right then and there -Yeah. -The nerdiest-- -Because it really happens. It's a joke. -Right. -It's a theater in the mind. -I can't-- I can't-- I can't disconnect myself. -The best jokes are the ones that you have to explain. -Well-- -I love that. -All right. Very good. -What else do you have for us? Anything where we'll take off? -So, tomorrow, I'm gonna do a blog on the difference between indoor and outdoor headphone-- -Ooh. -or inside and outside. -Is that close versus open or is it-- -Yeah, it's a whole bunch of things. I mean, it's-- that home headphones tend to be bigger, outdoor ones tend to be smaller, but-- -Sure. -it's beyond just size because a lot of companies that make great indoor headphones, full-sized headphones, they need a lot of juice to get going. -Uh-huh. -And they don't work well off portable buyers and stuff,-- -Uh-huh. -you know. So, it's sort of-- you know, looks sort of all angles and that. -All right. -And by the way, we almost forgot one of the most important thing. -We almost did. -On my 2 reviews of some Sony headphones, the-- -Oh. -MDR-V6 and the MDR-75. -Woah. You-- Did you update those? -No. I reviewed them. -It doesn't even offer, what, 20 years-- -Forever. -Yeah. -So, the V6 came out in 1985. -Wow. -The 7506 came out in 1991. They're basically designed as pro headphones. -Yeah. They were dinosaurs. -They're cheap. They're under $100 that basically every recording engineer, every location recordist has used these things for decades. And they come from the era when Sony, as I like to say, was Apple-- -Okay. -because those things were so great-- -Right. -that they never replaced them. -Uh-huh. -They never updated them and the V6, the one that came out in 1985, even the packaging is 1985. -That's cool. -Uh-huh. -Nothing is updated. It's a great headphone. They're worth it. -But before I reviewed it, it was $68 on Amazon. Now, it's like $85. -Really? You're driving the price up. -I'm driving the price up. -Look at you. -But it's so good. -That's awesome. -But it's not particularly portable. It has a 10-foot long cable. It's not super efficient. It doesn't work-- -Uh-huh. -the best off a portable player. I mean, it does, but it's not the ideal thing for 'em. -More for indoor stuff. -The 7506 looks exactly the same,-- -Uh-huh. -but it's not. It doesn't sound anything like it. It's much brighter, more detailed sounding. I think some-- you know, it's a 50/50. Some people would prefer the V6 on the 7506. -I kind of respect that, the fact that they haven't changed this so long. That's pretty cool. -There was a third product that was really popular around this time. It was the Sony V700. You probably don't talk about it. They're like the DJ headphones. -The big silver ones. -The silver ones. Yeah, exactly. Let me try to bring what they just-- -It's easy though. -Those broke right around like the pivot point-- -Uh-huh. -or you-- if you wanna use them with one ear, but these were, to me, the standard-- -Uh-huh. -for headphones. -Yeah. -If you were a DJ in the '90s, you had these. -Uh-huh. -And the base on them was crazy. -Uh-huh. -So, I think they probably came out around the same time when electronic music did. -Do they still make them? Do they still make them? -Yeah. They still definitely. -Why don't you review those, man? -Yeah. You should. -What about those ones that you love, the Koss ones. They haven't changed those. -Oh, the Koss Porta Pros. -Right? -Yeah. -Yeah. Those have been around since 1984. -Wow. -So, it's just interesting at a time where everyone is bringing out new shit all the-- stuff all the time-- -Uh-huh. -Yeah. -that here are these things that were right from the first place. -Yeah, it's kinda cool. -They don't have to make them better. They were already-- -They are great the way they are. -as good as they should be. -Uh-huh. -I feel like a lot of guitars are like that. -Oh yeah. -They make the same guitars for 40, 50 years. -Yeah. Actually, I wanna hear from our listeners about something that is still available today, but they would rather buy that than the new stuff that's coming out since. -Sure. Yeah. -You know like, okay, I will use my Koss Porta Pros example. I love those things. -I bet people would say about a few cars. -Yeah. I love to hear stuff that people are buying. -Oh, you know, what's great about the Porta Pros by the way? -Uh-huh. -When I wear them, people stop me on the street. -Yeah. -They're like those are great. -Yeah. -Yeah. -It's like it never happens when-- -Living in [unk] -There's something about those headphones. -They think it's a retro design, but-- -Yeah. -it's not. It is just unchanged from '84. -Oh, I have one guy that says to me, "I have 6 of those things." -Yeah. -Really? -And they're super cheap. That's the big thing about them. -Yeah, 40 bucks. And they have a lifetime guarantee. -Right. -You can step on them. You can put them on the washing machine. -Yeah. -You can do anything to them and they'll give you a new one. -For $6. -You gotta love that. -Yeah, I've done it several times. -For $6. And you don't even have to have the original receipt. -Right. -You just put the headphones into a box. -You just put $6. -And they take cash too. -Yeah. -I wouldn't suggest mailing cash, but you can if you want. -Right. -And they'll just send you a new pair of headphones. -I'll send it in pennies, right? -The only change they've made is the Porta Pro KTCs. -Uh-huh. -And those have a remote control right in the-- -Uh-huh. -in the wire. That's pretty awesome. -But they make a lot of models that they never change. -Yeah. Yeah. -That's-- -Porta Pro is the same thing. -That's awesome. -Yeah. -Very cool. -All right, man, this was great. This was fun. This is another good one, buddy. -Good. -All right. We'll say goodbye to you then, good sir. And we'll welcome you back sometime in August I imagine. -I hope so. Absolutely. -Right? -August is gonna be a wacky month for us. -Yeah. -I hope it's not hot. -Whatever-- -It's called August. -It's called August. -Well, usually August tends to be hotter. -It's the sun and the earth. They were in a certain relationship. -Yeah. I get it. I get it. I've been to the doctor. -They're both spheres by the way. -You're right. They are. -You can't fool this guy. -All right. -Follow Steve on Twitter, Audiophiliac Man, and then read his blog, The Audiophiliac on CNET. -And write something. -And write something and enter the contest-- -Yeah. -and see if you could become an audio-- the audiophiliac for the day. -You just have to be able to handle the rudeness of various commenters. -That's fine, man. -I can't control those people. -You got some thick skin, huh. -I-- Yeah. -I know you do. -What do they know? -It's because it's always so hot and never air condition. 866-404-CNET. That is our number. Leave us a voicemail over the weekend or you can e-mail us, the404@cnet.com. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, reddit. What else are we on? We gotta-- -A lot of stuff. -All that stuff. -Okay. Cupid-- -I saw a great Myspace commercial last night. -Really? -Yeah. Let's go back on Myspace. -It's still around? -We're on Tinder. We're on Tinder now. -Is it like the LPs? -L, who? -Myspace is like LPs. -Yeah. Exactly. Myspace is LPs. Yeah. I love that. -It's analogue. -I love it. -And that's it. Have a great weekend, guys. We're back here on Monday. Until then, I'm Jeff Bakalar. -I'm Justin Yu. -I'm Ariel Nunez. -Thanks again to Steve "Sphere" "The Gutman" Guttenberg. We love you, buddy. We'll see you soon. -In August. -Have a great weekend, guys. Later. -Bye.

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The 404 Show 1,593: Even more revealing Sony leaks, US gets fatter, lazier (podcast)
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The 404 Show 1,593: Even more revealing Sony leaks, US gets fatter, lazier (podcast)

The 404 Show 1,592: Using Tinder to hitchhike, foiling bike thieves on Facebook (podcast)
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The 404 Show 1,592: Using Tinder to hitchhike, foiling bike thieves on Facebook (podcast)

The 404 Show 1,591: Sony keeps getting hacked, Black Mirror, will VR ever work? (podcast)
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The 404 Show 1,591: Sony keeps getting hacked, Black Mirror, will VR ever work? (podcast)

The 404 Show 1,590: The flip phone returns, Street Fighter 5, Eaten Alive (podcast)
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The 404 Show 1,590: The flip phone returns, Street Fighter 5, Eaten Alive (podcast)

The 404 Show 1,589: Records were meant to be broken (podcast)
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The 404 Show 1,589: Records were meant to be broken (podcast)

The 404 Show 1,588: 20 years of PlayStation, Google improves captcha, dead tech of 2014
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The 404 Show 1,588: 20 years of PlayStation, Google improves captcha, dead tech of 2014

Tech Shows

The Apple Core
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The Apple Core

Alphabet City
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Alphabet City

CNET Top 5
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CNET Top 5

The Daily Charge
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The Daily Charge

What the Future
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What the Future

Tech Today
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Tech Today

Cooley On Cars
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Cooley On Cars

Carfection
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Carfection

Latest News

Driving 4,000 Miles in Lotus' New EV Was Brutal and I Loved It
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Driving 4,000 Miles in Lotus' New EV Was Brutal and I Loved It

A Closer Look at Apple's AI: What We Didn't Hear in the WWDC Keynote
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A Closer Look at Apple's AI: What We Didn't Hear in the WWDC Keynote

Dreamfoam Essential Mattress Review: The Ultimate Mattress for RVs and Trailers?
The Dreamfoam Essential mattress against a colorful background with a man's hands pushing down on the side of the bed.

Dreamfoam Essential Mattress Review: The Ultimate Mattress for RVs and Trailers?

Saatva Latex Hybrid Mattress Review: Should You Buy It?
The Saatva Latex Hybrid mattress sits on a bed frame while a man tests the edge of the mattress against a colorful background.

Saatva Latex Hybrid Mattress Review: Should You Buy It?

Lull Original Premium Mattress Review: A Cut Above Lull's Original Bed
The Lull Original Premium mattress with a man laying on top of the bed against a colorful background.

Lull Original Premium Mattress Review: A Cut Above Lull's Original Bed

Nolah Signature Mattress Review: Best Bed for Side Sleepers?
The Casper Wave mattress with a man laying on top of the bed against a colorful background.

Nolah Signature Mattress Review: Best Bed for Side Sleepers?

Our Mattress Experts Unbox Bear's Brand With Scott Paladini
Three people in a room filled with mattresses against a colorful background

Our Mattress Experts Unbox Bear's Brand With Scott Paladini

Tempur-Pedic Adapt Mattress Review: Reasons to Buy or Not Buy
The Tempur-Pedic Adapt mattress against a colorful background with a man's hands pushing down on the side of the bed.

Tempur-Pedic Adapt Mattress Review: Reasons to Buy or Not Buy

Casper Snow Mattress Review: Reasons to Buy or Not Buy
The Casper Snow mattress with a man laying on top of the bed against a colorful background with a man smiling in the front.

Casper Snow Mattress Review: Reasons to Buy or Not Buy

Casper Dream Hybrid Mattress Review: Reasons to Buy or Not Buy
The Casper Dream mattress with a man laying on top of the bed against a colorful background with a man smiling in the front.

Casper Dream Hybrid Mattress Review: Reasons to Buy or Not Buy