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Article updated on March 22, 2024 at 11:45 AM PDT

Best Earbuds and Headphones for Working Out for 2024

Check out our tested and approved top picks for workout headphones and earbuds. Whether you prefer in-ear or headphones for working out, we've got you covered.

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Written by 
David Carnoy
Our expert, award-winning staff selects the products we cover and rigorously researches and tests our top picks. If you buy through our links, we may get a commission. Reviews ethics statement
David Carnoy Executive Editor / Reviews
Executive Editor David Carnoy has been a leading member of CNET's Reviews team since 2000. He covers the gamut of gadgets and is a notable reviewer of mobile accessories and portable audio products, including headphones and speakers. He's also an e-reader and e-publishing expert as well as the author of the novels Knife Music, The Big Exit and Lucidity. All the titles are available as Kindle, iBooks, Nook e-books and audiobooks.
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Our Picks

$199 at Amazon
Image of Beats Fit Pro
Top wireless earbuds for sports
Beats Fit Pro
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$249 at Apple
Image of Apple AirPods Pro 2 (USB-C)
Best Apple noise-canceling wireless earbuds
Apple AirPods Pro 2 (USB-C)
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$68 at Amazon
The Earfun Pro 3 include a wireless charging case
Top budget wireless earbuds
Earfun Air Pro 3
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$299 at Bose
Image of Bose Ultra Open Earbuds
Best new open earbuds with an innovative clip-on design
Bose Ultra Open Earbuds
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$49 at Amazon
Image of Baseus Eli Sport 1
Best new budget sport earbuds with ear hooks
Baseus Eli Sport 1
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$60 at Amazon
Image of 1More Fit SE S30
Good value open earbuds with ear hooks
1More Fit SE S30
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$80 at Amazon
The Galaxy Buds FE have stabilizer fins like the discontinued Galaxy Buds Plus
Samsung earbuds with sport fins
Samsung Galaxy Buds FE
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$180 at Amazon
Image of Jabra Elite 8 Active
Best durable earbuds
Jabra Elite 8 Active
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$150 at Amazon
Image of Shokz OpenFit
Comfortable open earbuds with ear hooks
Shokz OpenFit
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$130 at Amazon
Image of Beats Studio Buds Plus
Top wireless earbuds from Beats
Beats Studio Buds Plus
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$80 at Amazon
Image of JBL Endurance Peak 3
Best new ear-hook style true-wireless earbuds
JBL Endurance Peak 3
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$48 at Amazon
Image of Soundpeats Air3 Deluxe HS
Best cheap open earbuds
Soundpeats Air3 Deluxe HS
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$55 at Walmart
Image of Sony CH-520
Best cheap on-ear headphones for working out
Sony CH-520
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$350 at Apple
Image of Beats Studio Pro
Best Beats over-ear headphones
Beats Studio Pro
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$299 at Bose
The Bose QuietComfort Ultra Earbuds are Bose's new flagship earbuds
Best for noise-canceling
Bose QuietComfort Ultra Earbuds
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$180 at Amazon
A woman using Shokz open-ear headphones during a workout
Best bone-conduction headphones
Shokz OpenRun Pro
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$128 at Amazon
Image of Sony CH-720N
Top value Sony midrange noise-canceling headphones
Sony CH-720N
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$80 at Amazon
aftershokz-openmove
Best budget bone-conduction headphones
Shokz OpenMove
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What are the best earbuds and headphones for working out right now?

In theory, you can use just about any headphones or earbuds for working out, but some models are more suitable for the gym than others. Sound quality is always an important factor when it comes to headphones, but when it comes to gym-friendly and sports-oriented headphones a secure and comfortable fit as well as durability (higher level water- and dust-resistance ratings) are key factors.

With earbuds, a design feature like wing tips or ear hooks that keep the buds from falling out of -- or falling off -- your ears can be important. For exmaple, the Beats Fit Pro earbuds have integrated wing tips, which is one of the reasons they're a top pick for workout earbuds. But even lightweight buds like the AirPods Pro 2 (iPhone users) and Beats Studio Buds Plus (iPhone and Android users) work well as workout earbuds if you can get a secure fit. I also like Bose's new Ultra Open Earbuds, which offer a comfortable and secure and allow you to hear what's going on around you. But some people prefer noise canceling earbuds or headphones at the gym so they can get into their own zone (some gyms play background music, which can be irritating).

If you're looking for a lightweight over-ear headphone for working out, Sony's CH-720N headphones are a good option because they're more affordable than Bose's QuietComfort Ultra Headphones, Sony's WH-1000XM5 or Apple's AirPods Max headphones (yes, I see plenty of people wearing those headphones in the gym).

I've included all kinds of workout earbuds and headphones on this list, including sport buds with both noise-isolating and open designs as well as bone-conduction headphones that leave your ears uncovered. I'll update this list as new models are released.

Read more: Best True Wireless Sports Earbuds With Ear Hooks for 2023

Best earbuds and headphones for working out of 2024

$199 at Amazon

Top wireless earbuds for sports

Beats Fit Pro

Hot on the heels of the third-generation AirPods, Apple has another new set of earbuds, this time from its subsidiary audio company, Beats. Technically, the new Beats Fit Pro aren't AirPods, but they're built on the same tech platform as the AirPods Pro. Unlike Beats' earlier and less expensive Studio Buds, the Beats Fit Pro include Apple's H1 chip and have most of the AirPods Pro's features, including active noise canceling, spatial audio and Adaptive EQ. I'd venture to call them the sports AirPods you've always wanted. And for some people, they might just be better than the AirPods Pro.

$249 at Apple

Best Apple noise-canceling wireless earbuds

Apple AirPods Pro 2 (USB-C)

Apple not only swapped in USB-C for Lightning connectivity in its new iPhone 15 models, but it made the switch with the AirPods Pro (2nd generation). The new AirPods Pro 2 with MagSafe (USB-C) are nearly identical to their Lightning predecessor, delivering the same excellent sound, noise canceling and voice-calling performance. That said, they offer some other small upgrades, including additional dust resistance and a new acoustic architecture that allows for Lossless Audio with the Vision Pro, Apple's upcoming wearable headset that is coming in February 2024 and costs $3,499. Is it possible that new acoustic architecture makes the buds sound subtly different with current devices like the iPhone? Maybe, maybe not. Either way, the AirPods Pro 2 (USB-C) are easy to recommend to Apple users despite their high price. Pro tip: Don't pay more than $190 for these, which is the online sale price at which they're now frequently available.

$68 at Amazon

Top budget wireless earbuds

Earfun Air Pro 3

Earfun has put out a series of wireless earbuds over the last couple of years with one important commonality: They're very good values, made more so by frequent discounts. The company's 2023 Earfun Air Pro 3 earbuds have the latest Qualcomm QCC3071 system-on-a-chip with aptX Adaptive for Android and other devices that support the new LE Audio standard and LC3 audio codec, which is superior to the SBC codec (they also support AAC for Apple devices).

Lightweight and comfortable to wear -- I got a good seal with the largest ear tip size -- these aren't a huge upgrade over the Earfun Air S, but they are better. They have slightly larger wool-composite drivers (11mm versus 10mm), slightly improved noise canceling and better battery life (up to seven hours with noise canceling on, according to Earfun).

In short, the Earfun Air 3 deliver strong performance for their modest price, with robust bass, good clarity and a relatively wide soundstage. They also pack in a lot of features, including a wireless charging case and "multidevice" connectivity. (I could pair them to two devices simultaneously but had to pause the music on one device and hit play on the other for the audio to switch.) They're IPX5 splash-proof and also work well (though not exceptionally well) as a headset for making calls. 

Note that after you activate the instant $12-off coupon at Amazon, adding the code EAP3CNET at checkout gives you an additional 20% off.

$348 at Bose

Best new open earbuds with an innovative clip-on design

Bose Ultra Open Earbuds

The Bose Ultra Open Earbuds have one of the most unusual designs of any earbuds I've tested over the last several years. They literally clip onto the side of your ears, kind of like earrings, and their open design has micro speakers that fire sound into your ears while still being able to hear what's happening around you. At $299, they're somewhat overpriced, but otherwise there's a lot to like about them, including a surprisingly comfortable, secure fit and very good sound quality for open buds.

$49 at Amazon

Best new budget sport earbuds with ear hooks

Baseus Eli Sport 1

Baseus is a value brand that makes well-designed charging products and earbuds. The Eli Sport 1 can be had for around $50 when you apply an instant 30% off discount coupon on Amazon. And while they may not sound quite as good as some of the premium open earbuds out there -- there can be a touch of distortion at higher volumes with bass-heavy tracks -- they sound quite decent for their modest price and I found them comfortable to wear. They look more premium than their price would indicate. They have 16.2mm drivers, are IPX4 splash-proof and are rated for up to 7.5 hours of battery life at moderate volume levels. I also liked that their case is relatively compact for this type of ear-hook style earbud and they come with a detachable neckband like some competitors. Voice-calling performance is also pretty good, though not great. Note that they're available in a few different colors, but Amazon currently only has them in black.

$60 at Amazon

Good value open earbuds with ear hooks

1More Fit SE S30

1More makes a couple of open sports earbuds with ear hooks. The  buds are the flagship and feature a little better sound than the Fit SE S30, have a more premium design and are fully waterproof (IPX7 rating). But I like the fit a little better on the step down S30, which is IPX5 splash-proof (can sustain a spray of water) and costs half the price, making it a better value.

The case is bulky and feels a little cheap (the lid is flimsy) but the buds themselves seem sturdily built and the ear hooks are nice and flexible. They have 14.2mm drivers that output decent but not great sound (there's a bit of distortion at higher volumes), which is par for the course for these types of open buds that sit on top of your ears and fire sound into them. They're also good but not great for voice calling. A companion app for iOS and Android allows you to tweak the sound with an equalizer and you can update the buds' firmware. The buds are available in black or white and offer up to 10 hours of battery life at moderate volume levels.

$80 at Amazon

Samsung earbuds with sport fins

Samsung Galaxy Buds FE

Carrying a list price of around $100, Samsung's 2023 Galaxy Buds FE feature a single driver (Samsung isn't saying what size it is), three mics on each earbud and active noise canceling. They charge in a case that's the same size and shape as what you currently get with all of Samsung's latest Galaxy Buds, including the Galaxy Buds 2 and Galaxy Buds 2 Pro. And they look a lot like an updated version of Samsung's discontinued Galaxy Buds Plus earbuds, which also came with a set of swappable fins that helped create a secure, comfortable fit. Like those buds, the Galaxy Buds FE are sweat-resistant with an IPX2 water-resistance rating that protects against splashes. 

They don't sound quite as rich as the Galaxy Buds Pro, and their voice-calling performance isn't up to the Buds Pro's level (it's decent, not great). But they do offer respectable sound quality (it's certainly as good as the Galaxy Buds 2's) and decent noise canceling. I also found them to be lightweight and comfortable to wear. While they may not measure up to more premium earbuds, including the Buds Pro, they deliver good bang for the buck. The Galaxy Buds FE are rated for up to 6 hours of battery life with noise canceling on and 8.5 hours with it off.

$180 at Amazon

Best durable earbuds

Jabra Elite 8 Active

Equipped with six microphones instead of four, slightly improved adaptive noise canceling and wind-reduction technology along with a higher durability rating, the Elite 8 Active look, feel and perform like a modestly upgraded version of the Elite 7 Pro and Elite 7 Active. Jabra is billing them as the "world's toughest earbuds," and based on our tests (they survived several drops without a scratch), that may very well be true.

$150 at Amazon

Comfortable open earbuds with ear hooks

Shokz OpenFit

Shokz, the company formerly known as AfterShokz, has long been the leader in bone-conduction headphones. Models like the OpenRun Pro, which deliver sound to your ear through your cheekbones, are popular with runners and bikers who like to leave their ears open for safety reasons. However, Shokz's new OpenFit model, the company's first true-wireless earbuds, doesn't use bone-conduction technology. They have an open design that fires sound into your ears using custom speaker drivers, which Shokz dubs "air conduction" technology.

I was impressed by how lightweight (8.3 grams) and comfortable they are -- they have one of the best ear-hook designs I've tried (Shokz calls it a Dolphin Arc ear hook). It's soft and offers just the right amount of flexibility to conform to the shape of your ear, with "dual-layered liquid silicone that provides a pliable fit," according to Shokz. The earbuds also sound quite good for open earbuds, though not quite as good as Cleer's Arc 2 Open Ear Sport earbuds ($190) that also have an ear-hook design.

$130 at Amazon

Top wireless earbuds from Beats

Beats Studio Buds Plus

Alas, for those of you who bought the original Beats Studio Buds, which remain on the market for now, I'm sorry to report that these new Plus buds are significantly improved, with better sound, noise canceling and battery life. Additionally, they now deliver top-notch voice-calling performance.

The transparent version is getting a lot of attention (who doesn't like transparent electronics?), but the big changes are on the inside. Beats says 95% of the components are new and improved, and the buds' "acoustic architecture" has been revised. The speaker drivers remain the same, but the Studio Buds Plus are powered by a new, more powerful custom chipset and have three new microphones in each bud, which are three times larger and more sensitive than the ones found in the Beats Studio Buds.

$80 at Amazon

Best new ear-hook style true-wireless earbuds

JBL Endurance Peak 3

JBL upgraded its ear-hook style sport earbuds in 2023. Available in black or white, the Endurance Peak 3 buds offer better battery life (up to 10 hours with four extra charges in their case) improved voice-calling performance and an IP68 rating that makes them fully water- and dust-proof. They also have an Ambient Aware transparency mode and Talk Thru mode that can automatically lower your music's volume level and open up the buds to the outside world. That means you can have conversation with someone without removing the buds from your ears.

They stayed on my ears very securely during runs and I thought they sounded quite good, though they do have a bit of bass push (i.e. they have powerful bass). Just be aware that if you don't get a tight seal, sound quality will be significantly worse. Also, like other earbuds with ear-hook designs, the case is on the beefy side. That said, the buds do seem durable and if you get a good fit, they're an excellent and less pricey alternative to the Beats Powerbeats Pro. I also thought the touch controls worked well; I was easily able to toggle through the sound modes.

$48 at Amazon

Best cheap open earbuds

Soundpeats Air3 Deluxe HS

What makes these Soundpeats Air3 Deluxe HS buds special is that they sound surprisingly good for open earbuds -- they're pretty close to what you get from Apple's AirPods 3 for sound. On top of that, they support Sony's LDAC audio codec for devices that offer it. Not too many cheap open earbuds have good sound but these Soundpeats have good bass response and clarity. They're also good for making calls and have a low-latency gaming mode.

So long as they fit your ears securely, they make for very good workout buds with an IPX4 splash-proof rating.

$55 at Walmart

Best cheap on-ear headphones for working out

Sony CH-520

Sony released these entry-level CH-720N noise-canceling headphones in 2023. They're quite good, but if you can't afford them (they list for $150), the company's new budget on-ear CH-520 headphones are an intriguing option for only around $50.

They lack noise canceling and are pretty no-frills, but they feature good sound for their price, are lightweight and pretty comfortable for on-ear headphones, and also have excellent battery life (they're rated for up to 50 hours at moderate volume levels). Additionally, they have multipoint Bluetooth pairing, so you can pair them with two devices simultaneously, such as a smartphone and computer, and switch audio. Voice-calling performance is decent, though not up to the level of what you get with the CH-720N. 

Note that there's no wired option -- this is a wireless Bluetooth-only headphone. The CH-520 offers overall balanced sound with decent clarity. The bass has some punch to it but doesn't pack a wallop, and you're not going to get quite as wide a soundstage as you get from Sony's more expensive over-ear headphones. But these definitely sound better than Sony's previous entry-level on-ear headphones and sound better than I thought they would. I tried the white color but they also come in blue and black.

$350 at Apple

Best Beats over-ear headphones

Beats Studio Pro

Love 'em or hate 'em, Beats Studio headphones are among the most popular headphones of all time, launching as wired headphones back in 2008. This is the fourth generation of them, and they carry the same list price as their predecessor and look very similar on the outside but have some big changes on the inside that make them significantly better headphones. I'm tempted to describe them as more affordable plastic versions of the AirPods Max. However, that's not quite accurate due to a choice in chipsets and one notable missing feature. But read our full review to find out what makes these very good headphones, albeit with some caveats.

$348 at Bose

Best for noise-canceling

Bose QuietComfort Ultra Earbuds

While the QC Ultra Earbuds aren't a major upgrade over Bose's excellent QC Earbuds 2 that were released in 2022, they're definitely a little better. They should fit most ears very well, and they feature superb noise canceling, arguably the best out there. And a natural-sounding transparency mode with a new ActiveSense feature kicks in some ANC should the sound get too loud around you (it's sort of similar to the AirPods Pro's Adaptive Audio feature). They also sound slightly better overall, with a touch more clarity, and their new Immersive Audio feature opens up the sound a bit.

$180 at Amazon

Best bone-conduction headphones

Shokz OpenRun Pro

AfterShokz changed its name to Shokz and released new ninth-generation bone-conduction headphones that offer slightly improved bass performance compared to the company's earlier flagship model, the Aeropex (now called the Shokz OpenRun). That makes the OpenRun Pro the best bone-conduction headphones you can get right now, although they still can't match the sound quality of traditional headphones.

Bone conduction wireless headphones don't go on your ears -- they actually deliver sound to your ear through your cheekbones. The big benefit of this technology as a safety feature for running is that, thanks to its open design, you can hear what's going on around you -- traffic noise in particular -- while listening to music or having a phone conversation (yes, they perform well for voice calls). Plus, some race coordinators don't allow runners to wear anything in their ears, which is where headphones like this come in handy.

Like the Aeropex, the OpenRun Pro have a lightweight, wraparound titanium frame and are rated for up to 10 hours of music playback and you can get 1.5 hours of battery life from a 5-minute charge (they have a proprietary charging cable instead of USB-C, which is unfortunate). I found them comfortable to wear but you may occasionally have to adjust them on your head to relieve potential pressure points. While they do offer a bit fuller sound with more bass -- it's an incremental improvement, not a huge leap forward -- like other bone-conduction headphones these are strongest in the midrange where voices live so they're very good for podcasts, talk radio, newscasts and audiobooks. A hard carrying case is included. 

Note that Shokz makes other, more affordable bone-conduction headphones, including the OpenRun, if you don't want to drop $180 on its current flagship model.

$128 at Amazon

Top value Sony midrange noise-canceling headphones

Sony CH-720N

Sony's improved entry-level noise canceling headphones, the CH-720Ns, have a bit of a plasticky budget vibe, but they're lightweight and very comfortable. Part of me was expecting them to sound pretty mediocre, but I was pleasantly surprised. No, they don't sound as good as the WH-1000XM5s. But they sound more premium than they look (and feel), and their overall performance is a step up from their predecessor, the CH-710Ns. Are they worth $150? Maybe -- or maybe not. But the good news is that, like the CH-710N and WH-XB910 before them, these have already seen significant discounts, with prices dropping to as low as $100 during flash sales.

$80 at Amazon

Best budget bone-conduction headphones

Shokz OpenMove

Shokz' entry-level OpenMove bone-conduction headphone lists for $80, though we've occasionally seen it drop below $70. It replaces the older Titanium model and features some small design upgrades. I found it comfortable to wear and while it doesn't sound great, it sounds relatively good for a bone-conduction headphone -- again, keep your sound quality expectations in check or you'll be disappointed. It's very good for listening to podcasts, audiobooks and news broadcasts while you run. 

This model charges via USB-C and includes a simple carrying pouch. Battery life is rated at up to 6 hours.

Other workout headphones and earbuds we tested

Soundcore by Anker Sport X10: The Soundcore Sport X10 have an interesting design with rotating swiveling ear hooks that flip up when you're using them and flip down when you want to set them in their charging case, which has a smaller footprint than a lot of buds with ear hooks. As long as you get a tight seal, they sound good, with powerful, punchy bass and good detail. They also have active noise canceling, which is effective though not as good as Sony's or Bose's noise canceling. They're also fully waterproof with an IPX7 rating, which means they can be fully submerged in up to 3 feet of water for 30 minutes. Battery life is rated at up to eight hours with an additional three charges in the charging case.

Sennheiser Sport True Wireless: The Sport True Wireless earbuds (around $100) are essentially Sennheiser's CX True Wireless earbuds with sport fins -- for a more secure fit -- and better durability. They have an IP54 rating that makes them splash-proof and dust-resistant. The CX True Wireless, rated IPX4, don't offer dust resistance.

Skullcandy Push Active: With their ear-hook design, they're essentially a more affordable version of the Beats Powerbeats Pro and they actually fit my ears slightly better than the Powerbeats Pro -- I'm not usually a fan of ear-hook style buds, but these are one of the better models. They also cost a lot less than the Beats.

Cleer Audio Arc 2 Sport: Cleer's original Arc earbuds were solid sport earbuds that featured decent sound for open-style buds that sit on top of your ears and fire sound into them. The 2023 model (around $170) steps up the sound quality and offers additional refinements and feature upgrades, including a new "enhanced" charging case with UV sterilization and multipoint Bluetooth connectivity (Bluetooth 5.3), all of which makes for a significantly improved product.

Beats Powerbeats Pro: While the Powerbeats Pro remain popular workout earbuds, they've been around for several years, so it's best to buy them at significant discount.

JBL Live Pro 2: Over the years, JBL has put out some decent true-wireless earbuds, but nothing that really got me too excited. That's finally changed with the arrival of the Samsung-owned brand's new Live Pro 2 and Live Free 2 buds. Both sets of buds -- the Live Pro 2 have stems while the Live Free 2 have a pill-shaped design -- offer a comfortable fit along with strong noise canceling, very good sound quality and voice-calling performance, plus a robust set of features, including multipoint Bluetooth pairing, an IPX5 splash-proof rating and wireless charging.

Sony LinkBuds: The LinkBuds are, in a sense, Sony's answer to Apple's standard AirPods. While they don't sound as good as Sony's flagship WF-1000XM4 or the LinkBuds S noise-isolating earbuds, they offer a discreet, innovative design and a more secure fit than the AirPods, as well as decent sound and very good voice-calling performance. Like the third-gen AirPods, their open design allows you to hear the outside world -- that's what the ring is all about. Read our Sony LinkBuds review.

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Factors to consider when buying workout headphones and earbuds

Budget

Before anything else, you'll want to figure out how much you're willing to spend on new wireless sports buds or headphones. The quality of value-priced earbuds and headphones continues to improve, so you can find good options for less than $75. But the premium models, which offer better build quality and performance, tend to cost more than $100 and sometimes more than $150.

Noise-isolating or open design

Sports buds are available in a couple of styles. Some come with silicone tips that are designed to create a tight seal in your ear and keep sound out (they have a noise-isolating design). Others have an open design with the buds resting on top of your ears, firing sound into them. The noise-isolating style typically gives you better sound with stronger bass while the open design has the advantage of allowing sound in for safety reasons.

Fit, aka comfort

It's key that sports earbuds and headphones fit you not only comfortably but securely. They should offer a comfortable fit that allows you to wear the earbuds (or headphones) for long periods of time without any irritation.

Durability

You want sport buds or headphones that hold up well over time, so look for models that we note have sturdy build quality and a good water-resistance rating.

Return policy

It's critical to buy your sports buds and headphones at a retailer that has a good return policy, in case you have buyer's remorse. Some people who are having trouble deciding between two models sometimes buy both, try them out for a few days and then return one.

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How we test workout earbuds and headphones

We test workout headphones and earbuds based on six key criteria and evaluate the models we test in both a gym environment and for outdoor workouts that include a three-mile run. These criteria include designsound qualitynoise-canceling performancevoice-calling performance, features and value

  • Design: Evaluating design, we assess not only how comfortable the headphones and earbuds fit (their ergonomics) but their build quality and how well the controls are implemented. When it comes to earbuds, we also look at water- and dust-resistance ratings. 
  • Sound quality: We evaluate sound quality by listening to a set playlist of music tracks and comparing the earbuds to top competing products in their price range. Sonic traits such as bass definition, clarity, dynamic range and how natural the headphones sound are key factors in our assessment.
  • Noise-canceling performance: We evaluate noise-canceling performance by wearing the headphones in the same spot indoors near a noisy HVAC unit to see how well they do at muffling lower frequencies. Then we head out to the streets of New York to test the headphones in a real-world environment where we see how they do muffling not only street noise but people's voices. 
  • Extra features: Some great-sounding workout headphones and earbuds aren't loaded with features, but we do take into account what extra features are on board. These include everything from quick-access awareness to transparency modes (your music pauses and the headphones open up to the outside world so you can have a conversation) to special sound modes to ear-detection sensors that automatically pause your music when you take the headphones off your ears. We also take a look at the companion app for the headphones if there is one and how user friendly it is. 
  • Voice-calling: When we test voice-calling performance, we make calls in the noisy streets of New York and evaluate how well the headphones or earbuds reduce background noise and how clearly callers can hear our voice.
  • Value: We determine value after evaluating the strength of the headphones and earbuds against all these criteria and what they're able to deliver compared to other models in their price class. 
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Workout earbuds and headphones FAQs

Does sweat resistance matter?

While most full-size headphones don't have a water-resistance rating, they tend to be somewhat sweat-resistant -- though not officially so -- due to how they sit off your ears with only the ear pads touching your head. You should wipe them down after sweating with a slightly damp cloth or baby wipe. Most earbuds are sweat resistant. However, if you're a heavy sweater you may to get earbuds with a higher IP water-resistance rating. An IPX4 splash-proof rating is pretty common (that's what the AirPods 3 and AirPods Pro 2 have), but you can find sports buds that are dust-proof and fully waterproof with an IP68 rating, meaning it can be submerged under water up at up to a meter or two for 30 minutes. You can view a full list of IP codes on Wikipedia.

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Are in-ear or over-ear headphones better for working out?

True-wireless in-ear headphones, aka earbuds, have become very popular for working out because they're lightweight, unobtrusive and allow your ears to breathe. Some weightlifters like to work out in full-size headphones because you can slip them on and off and wear them around your neck when not in use. But your ears will steam up if you're working out hard or running with them, particularly in warmer environments. That said, if you're working out in a colder environment, over-ear headphones will keep your ears warm, like ear muffs. Over-ear headphones do offer better battery life than in-ear models.

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Does sweat ruin headphones?

Yes, sweat can slowly degrade earbuds and headphones over time or cause them to die. That's why you'll want to wipe them down after you sweat on them. What's nice about fully waterproof earbuds is that you can wash them off in the sink after sweating on them heavily.

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How do you make earbuds stay in your ears when exercising?

You can get earbuds that have ear hooks or wing tips that help keep the buds in your ears. Another alternative is to buy third-party foam ear tips that have more grip to them than silicone ear tips. For example, foam ear tips help keep the AirPods Pro 2 in your ears more securely.

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