Systm: DIY portable Nintendo 64
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Systm: DIY portable Nintendo 64

Culture
[ Music ] >> This episode of System is brought to you by the United States Air Force, Netflix, and Godaddy.com. >> Everyone is out today, so it's just me and the intern. No, no, no, really. It's going to be an awesome episode. It turns out that the segue building intern here, Daniel has an awesome mod for turning that old Nintendo 64 sitting in your closet into a portable gaming unit so you can play anywhere, any time. Hacking your N 64 into a portable gaming system, on this episode of System. ^M00:00:34 [ Music ] ^M00:00:53 >> Video gaming, like PC technology, progresses at a pretty astonishing rate. So it's more than likely that you'll have one of those old school Nintendo 64s sitting somewhere in the basement, attic, basement, you know, somewhere. That old gaming console has a lot of life in it. So much life, that you could probably take it, mod it, and turn it into a portable gaming unit. One that doesn't need a TV, a power outlet, you can play it in the car, on the bus, cruise line, whatever. Here to show us how to do it -- Daniel. [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> What kind of possessed you into building this thing in the first place? >> Well, there are a bunch of [Inaudible] gadget, bunch of the [Inaudible] where everyone was making their hacks for the portable 360 laptop, Xbox 360 laptop, PS3, and there was a bunch of really cool ones I saw for the Nintendo 64, and I had [Inaudible] around and it was pretty much my childhood. So I thought it would be a pretty cool project to take on and make it into a little hand held. >> In fact, it actually requires a few extra parts other than a Nintendo 64. What do you need? >> What you need to do, basically, the Nintendo 64, obviously. And a little screen that will actually play the video. And what you can use for that, works really great, is the PS1 screen. Which was sold with the original PS -- the small PlayStation unit. And they made a little scene for that. And what happens with that is just one wire is analog in, which you can take from the Nintendo, just wire that up. >> Now could you use another LCD screen. Could you use one, say from a portable DVD player, or one of those little small portable TVs. >> You can basically use any screen you find that has analog input. >> So the key feature that you need in any kind of screen that you do put up has to have an analog composite input into the screen. >> Yes, you want to have that input plus somewhere -- voltage range around 7 volts or so, because that's what you can get off a battery pack. Something that doesn't run off 120 volts like a small tiny TV or something like that. >> I see these batteries that you have right here. Now where did you get these, are these something that you can buy off an electronic's store or -- >> You could buy those at an electronic's store, but what I did was we actually got a DVD player, and the portable DVD players have a little tiny screen which is what we're going to be running on the Nintendo. And what's excellent about buying the premade package with the battery and the circuit and all that stuff is that you'll actually get the circuit. That circuit will do the charging for you by just plugging it in through a little power supply that comes with the DVD player, rather than buying the batteries themselves and trying to pull them out every time, hook up to a separate charger and all that other stuff. >> So was there a particular model DVD player that you have to buy, or is it something that you can, like, pick out one of the generic ones on the market. >> What works really well is the Polaroid DVD players have a great line of small -- small little packages with great battery life. And the P D -- the P D V 0700 is the great -- best model. This is the model we used. Maybe not the best model, but you can basically use anything that has a replaceable battery pack. >> Now having actually signed the check -- or the credit card receipt for this, this is actually pretty cheap. We got it second hand. I think we picked it up for 30 -- 30, $40. >> Yeah somewhere around there, on Amazon. [Inaudible] go on eBay too, to find something. >> Really, inexpensive. The great thing, as you mentioned, it already has the controller board on it, so you don't have to develop anything or -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> It has the balancing and all that stuff too. So you actually have the safe circuit rather than having something -- polymer batteries in there, and you always hear about the laptop battery explosions, all that stuff. With the circuit it will actually help out with restricting it from the battery voltage getting too low or something shorting out. >> Now in terms of the board itself, was there any additional capacitors, resistors, or anything you needed? >> We had to get a power supply. Because what's going on with the Nintendo, it takes a -- 3.3 -- 3.3 volt in on one side and then 12 volts in on the other side. So we -- our battery pack is 7.4 volts, and we can actually set that down with a voltage regulator, and get the 3.3 volts it needs as well. So we had to get a little chip from Texas Instruments, and that was the PTH 08080 WAZ. And what's great about this is you can actually get it for free. Texas Instruments actually sends them out -- sends out samples. So you can order a sample off the web site. And besides the board, you'll also need a hundred microferin capacitor and a small resistor, depending on the value for the application, 3.3 volts. It's 1.1 K, which is [Inaudible] I believe. >> Not to sound too ignorant, what does this thing do? >> Say you have -- this is 12 volts, say it's 12 volts. And the line in for the board is 12 volts, and there's a separate line for 3.3 volts. We actually need to step that down to 3.3 volts. So this is actually like a little power supply like you have on your laptops that you carry around with you. So instead of having the 120 volts A C adaptor -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> Got it. >> All right. And finally you nineteenth something to put everything in, I mean, because you can't really use the case it came in, because it's so big. >> You could use the -- there's been some pretty cool cases that people have actually taken the actual Nintendo 64 case, with a really cool handle, the whole thing with buttons and screens. Basically make the screen out of whatever you want. What we did here was we took the hard drive case and hacked it up, put the screen on there -- >> Wait, wait, wait, wait. The hard drive case. Wait a minute, isn't this the one I was looking for the other day. >> No, I don't think so. >> But you also mentioned something about an electronic project kit box. >> Yeah, project box. What's great about the art of hobbyists, [Inaudible] like that, there's a bunch of places Radio Shack, Fries Electronics [Assumed spelling] or you can go on line and get little things like project boxes, which are great for just doing any kind of electronics project. They're a plastic box, screws on there [Inaudible] sometimes, and basically it's made for coming apart, drilling holes, and putting buttons in for your application. >> Cool. Now the only other things we need to worry about are sound, and, like, control, right? >> Sound and control, yes. Sound -- what's great about the PS1 screen it actually comes with speakers, and it has [Inaudible] audio. So not only do you get the video but you get the audio. >> I see why it's such a popular item for this mod. >> Yeah. It's the biggest one for all little hand held mods. As great. And for the controller what we could have done is take buttons, put them in there, reroute all the wiring. But instead of going through all that -- the little -- little -- little wires and little traces and coming through -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> Yeah, yeah. I tried that out, and it didn't work the first time because the board I had, well, cutting it apart and trying to reroute all the traces didn't really work out. So what we're doing here for this one, we will have these little game ports that came right off the -- right off the Nintendo, have that going off the side and then just plug the controller in. And use the controller holding it. And already have a nicely made -- >> Now was the biggest issue the cutting portion that severed your connection and made it unusable, or was it the fact that soldering the traces was kind of unreliable. >> There were two big issues. One of them was actually going out and cutting it an breaking apart, rewiring and rerouting all the traces. And the second part was actually to find a way to get the buttons actually on the surface that you're using. Because they're all [Inaudible] molded parts that form perfectly to the shape of the controller. So getting that to apply, moving it over to your new case, or even just mounting them with the buttons being able to go up and down was a little difficult. >> All right. So we have all our tools, you had a soldering iron, use the screw driver to take the case off, and you also mentioned a Dremel tool and a hot glue gun. >> Yeah, a Dremel tool and a hot glue gun are just really great tools for having around, if you're trying to hack together a case. Because there's going to be a lot of cutting on the case, a lot of glues, mending things together. Hot glue is not a bad way to go if you don't overdue it. It's perfect for putting the screen on to this case, stuff like that. >> I used to use hot glue to connect LEDs to my computer because I was too lazy to affix it to the case in any normal way. So just take a glob of glue and you glue it in there [Inaudible] -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> Something I'd produce. [ Music ] >> Time to thank one of the sponsors of the show. 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[ Music ] >> Now I noticed that you actually have the shell here, Daniel, of the N 64 that you used. >> See, we actually took it apart and set it all up to make sure that it will work before we spent all the time on this show taking it apart and making everything. >> Now there was essentially -- you only had to unscrew the bottom, right? >> To get the case apart we had to unscrew the bottom and there were a few more screws under the board. What we did was -- there -- Nintendo has these crazy little screws, they're actually just like a little round mound with a bunch of little ridges around it. So what [Inaudible] it's really hard to get into those things, you actually have to go in there with pliers and actually twist them around and try to get all the stuff out. What works really well is if you get a Bic pen -- >> What do you do with this Bic pen? >> The Bic pen, and you find the top [Inaudible] there, just the tip where the ink is stored, and you pull that out with pliers. So you pull that out, and then you can actually use that tip and then just jamb it, and it just unscrews. >> So what you're telling me, you take a Bic pen, you take out the actual pen portion of the pen, take the casing, you do this, you stick it in and -- >> And you unscrew. >> You unscrew? >> Yeah. >> Oh wow. >> Or you can go and buy a $10 tool. >> That's go MacGyver, dude. That's like the MacGyver award right there. Now once you get this thing apart, I mean, do you need any of the pieces left in here once you take off the -- >> One piece you might want to keep is the heat sync that's actually bolted on the board. And when you take it off, it's pretty obvious what you need to unscrew to get the parts off. There's some screws that actually bolt onto the board itself, which have heat sync, and that keeps everything cool, the processor and all the memory and all that stuff. You can take that off, but you want to make sure you replace it with something that will transfer the heat pretty well when you make your new case. >> Do you just slap it into something, or what do you do next. >> Oh, well, you start -- you need to start conjoining all the parts together. So after you get the Nintendo apart, you want to do the same thing with the DVD player and the PS1 screen. >> So from the DVD player we get this fabulous dual battery and controller -- >> Two Lithium cells there, with the -- with the control board, with the charger and the balancing and all of that stuff. >> And all you did was literally unscrew the unit and pull this out. >> Yeah, it's more trying to get the case, like, wiggling it out. It kind of snaps together with a couple screws holding it together. >> But you didn't have to desolder anything to get connect -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> You have to desolder one thing, which is the tip of the connector. There's a big connector, that one up there. That was actually a pad, so when you add the replacement battery pack it actually would just snap in. And this is -- as everything that's inside there. [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> So we took off the little connector and just put wires on there instead of having little pads that were string-loaded. >> Ah, and so you actually soldered these two bits on yourself. And this is so you have a separate switch that you can actually remotely locate onto the case. >> Exactly. And then using the charging port we just hack together a little connector that would go into the power supply that came with the DVD battery. So the little guy that the cartridge goes into sticks out a bit. And instead of -- you don't actually go in there to -- if you look on the side, too, you see that there is this two different sides, the bottom expansion port which was on the [Inaudible] which I don't even need to know what happened to that. And the front, which the game actually goes into. And what's great, this came apart, the front will actually pull right out. >> So this portion -- >> You can go ahead and just pull it right out of there. >> You can pull it out. I don't want to break it. Broken enough things -- oh. That's nice. >> It's got little pins, just pulls right out. And then that's great for -- if you want to relocate that cartridge itself somewhere else on the case, you can just mount it with screws and then just solder a bunch of wires going in, or find a plug. >> So you're telling me you got to -- if you want to mount this remotely -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> You have to take -- you have to connect each pin back to the pad on the board? >> You have to do that. You can go in there and actually solder all 51, which I did the first time on the other board because we didn't have any connectors for it. Or you can go on to Digitikey or some other electronics or Radio Shack probably doesn't have them, but just a plug that will actually -- has the right pitch of the spacing of the pins, and the plug will go on there and you will have ribbon cable going on. >> So other than batteries, the other thing you had to dissemble besides the Nintendo 64 and the DVD player was the PS1 screen. Now the PS1 screen actually comes as a screen. It has a little tab has it's supposed to mount on the PSX. >> Yes. It actually has little screws to screw onto the PSX with little receptacles that go right in there, put a few plugs in. >> Pretty hard. Was it just basically unscrew a few things and [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> There were a couple hidden screws. Under the speaker covers there were a couple screws hidden under there, so you actually needed to peel it back, it was actually a little sticker. And little rubber grommets that you had to take out pliers or a knife to get it out. >> Now what are these wire leads that are coming out the base of the screen. >> Those are actually the wire leads that will be going into the Nintendo 64. >> Were those ones you put in there are were those -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> We had to solder in there. >> So how many -- [Inaudible] sodering power, video -- >> We're doing power, video, and audio. >> Okay. So that was a total of how many -- five, six -- >> There's six leads total. >> Ow. >> So there's four for the power, audio -- four leads for the video, audio, and ground, and then power and ground. >> Now was there anything special in terms of -- because I noticed it's kind of at an odd angle, so you actually had to pull the screen off to solder down -- >> You had to take the case apart. What you can actually do -- pull this top guy off. And this is the actual insides of the screen. And then -- >> You take the screen, you take the bezel off the screen off? >> We don't take the bezel, we take this whole thing. The bezel with the board. The board that has the driver and all the power for it. >> So you take it off the plastic case. >> Take it off the plastic case, and you can see there's the two little receptacles for little wires that would actually go into the video in, the way the board was actually made. Because we're not using all those, I just soldered on the 30 tiny 30-gauge wire onto the pads. >> What's next? >> After you wired in and you actually solder everything, and then you solder it to here, just make sure your connections are all straight. Especially with this -- want to use this tiny wire here. It's more important if you're doing it with actually soldering onto the pads, because I had a lot of points where it looks like it's soldered on but it actually just comes off when you put everything together, and then you have to -- >> Cold solder? >> Yeah, yeah. So just make sure that everything's connected well, and test everything. >> You mentioned earlier we needed to connect this power supply as one of the first things we did, to connect the board and the battery. >> Yes, to the battery, the board, and the screen. So this power supply, once we hook this guy up, once you get it all soldered up with the capacitor an the resistor, and like I said there will be schematics on there on how to do it and where everything is supposed to be soldered, but plug in the battery to it and turn the battery on if you have a switch, or plug in -- solder it straight onto the battery and make sure you're getting 3.3 volts out of this system. Make sure it's wired up as well, and test it out. Once you know that you have 3.3 volts coming out of here you want to wire the 3.3 volts into the board on the Nintendo 64 where the power receptacle was. So where the little plug was that the big power brick went into, you want to -- you want to actually solder these on back. >> So up in the corner -- >> Yeah, there's actually a -- markings on the back of the board which will tell you these pads are 3.3 volts, these ones are ground, this one is 12 volts. So wire up the 3.3 volts coming out of the regulator to the board where it says 3 .3 volts to go. And we'll put the schematic up there so you can see exactly. Then the battery needs to also plug into the Nintendo 64 with just the 7.4 volts. Not with just the 3.3 volts. So basically the battery has two lines going in to the board. One going to the regulator to drop down the voltage and one going in, giving it the higher 7.4 volts. ^M00:18:06 [ Music ] ^M00:18:08 >> We'd like to take a moment now for a short message from the United States Air Force. >> I'm Airman First Class John [Inaudible]. >> I'm an aerospace propulsion apprentice. What that means is I'm a jet engine mechanic in the Air Force. We're about to start the engine up. Pretty intense, a lot of wind, a lot of noise. [ Background noise ] ^M00:18:29 [ Music ] ^M00:18:31 >> Okay cool. So what is our next step, something about a red light? >> Yes. So once you hook up the power to everything you want to make sure that the parts are actually getting the power. So you -- since we're not going through all the rest of the wiring now, we're at the point where we're soldering on the video, so we won't know if anything's actually turning on. But the way we'll do that is we'll actually plug everything in and make sure that your board and your screen are getting power, and I'll correct myself actually, [Inaudible] on because there's the red light on the Nintendo that will turn on if the Nintendo is getting power. >> So if this little thing goes up like Rudolph's noise -- >> Exactly. >> -- it should be an A-okay. >> It should be an A-okay if you get the light on. Then everything should be fine and you're not shorting anything out. >> Now that came with the system, that's not something that -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> That's just a little light that turns on when you turn on the system. And then the screen actually has buttons on there which are used for volume and brightness, and even though you're not getting a video feed, but if the screen itself is getting power you can still use those buttons and a little graph will appear. >> Oh, I see. Essentially you play around with these buttons you can see the screen itself come up with the low onscreen menu -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> And then you know you've got juice into -- >> And then you know your power is set up fine through the battery, the power regulator, the board, and the screen. What I'm going to do here is set up power from the battery going over to the regulator and the screen. So that's where I was talking about earlier, how we're going to take the battery and have three different pairs of wires coming out of it. So let's see, here I'm going to go -- [Inaudible] up the wires on the three -- three pairs that we need here. I'm just going to go and [Inaudible] them by putting some solder on there to make it easier to solder everything else [Inaudible] held together. [Inaudible] now the little 30-gauge wire, it's going to be a little tricky to solder on there, so what I do first is I go and I get some rosin or some flux here, and actually just paste it onto the wires, kind of do a little coat on there. And we'll go -- with the soldering iron, and tend them a little bit. >> Now the rosin will let you do -- the flux will let you do what? >> The flux, yes. It helps with the solder sticking onto the wire. So it's great for a lot of the small pads where you need more the solder to -- just doesn't stick that well. So you just paste -- [Inaudible] paste over some flux and then will be a -- make it a little easier. ^M00:20:55 [ Music ] ^M00:21:03 >> Definitely a thing to be aware of, too, just while you're putting together the case and everything else, that if you're having all these open electronics without the cases on them you're going to have a lot of open leads, so you want to make sure that you cover all the special leads, a lot of the power things just get electrical tape and cover up the boards. Especially if you're putting in a metal case like we are over here. ^M00:21:24 [ Music ] ^M00:21:41 >> Let's see, now that we have the wires all split up, let's see, let's connect the power regulator to the -- to the Nintendo itself. Let's see, pads 4, 5, and 1 are ground. And you'll see that when you take apart the board. >> So it's labelled -- it's silk-screened on to the board. >> Yeah, it's silk-screened on [Inaudible] -- yeah. 1, 3, 4, and 6 [Inaudible] are silk-screened. So the bottom row is 1, 2, 3, and the top is 4, 5, and 6. So 1, 5 are ground. While 3 and 2 are the 3.2 volts which is what you're feeding to the -- feeding to the power regulator. And you actually don't need to go and fill up both pins. If you'll see -- if you look on the board you can actually see where -- where the two pins are connected. So just the ones 2 and 3 are connected to each one, so you only need solder to one of the pins out of the 2 or 3 for the 3.3 volts. The same for the 12 volt line. ^M00:22:48 [ Music ] ^M00:22:55 >> All right, so now we have the power all wired up for the system. And let's go ahead and try to see if this will turn on. It's not turning on right now. Let's go and check everything, make sure [Inaudible] is right. So let's see, so pull up the [Inaudible] meter, and because it's not working right now, we go ahead and check for any voltage. So first we go to the battery pack. And we are getting 8 volts off of that. So it's actually fine. [Inaudible] there. Oh, another switch installed. This is the final thing we had to do, put the power switch [Inaudible] we actually took this off which we didn't show earlier, but I took off this power switch from the Nintendo board itself, and that's the little slider that you have on the case to turn the whole system on and off. So make sure you have that in there, and that's turned on. And then you get your red light, and it turns on. It's separate from the actual power switch from the battery pack and the whole system. >> So does that mean when you try to play this you have to flip two switches to turn it on. >> You can either do that -- the first reason why I took this off was so we can just -- so I can put the pins -- put wires across the pins so it's permanently on. But we didn't go ahead and do that, so just solder back on the switch and now we have -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> But you could potentially have basically just soldered it constantly on? >> Yes, yeah. >> All right, so we have everything wired together, we have power to the main board, we have power to the screen. >> That's right. >> So what's left that we have to do. >> Now it's a matter of turning it on. Since we got the power set up on both sides we can just -- let's see, we install our switch for the battery pack that's going to the Nintendo and to the screen. And if we turn it on we'll get that red light over here on the Nintendo. And let's see, we'll just turn this around. You should be able to see something going on your screen. You'll at least see the back light go up, and what you can do is -- you might not have the video feed set up yet but you can actually just press the buttons and see the little lower thirds, the brightness [Inaudible] and that will tell you that you have the power on, the screen is working the way it should be. Now after we took everything apart we took out the game cartridge holder which is this little receptacle that unplugs right out, and we also take out, we took out the little expansion card. And that's basically like the memory for the -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> That was the N 64 expanded 2 -- or 4 mega [Inaudible] -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> This one is just basically a little card that just replaces -- just a dead card. Doesn't do anything. But just let's you know something is plugged in there. So you want to make sure that you have that in. What that normally comes in though is the case that we took it out of. A little black case has heat sync on there. We took it out to save space on our own system case. >> Cool. >> So make sure you plug this guy back in here. >> All right. >> And we'll plug the little cartridge receptacle receiver in here. >> Nice, nice. >> And then we'll grab a game and this is my favorite game, [Inaudible] first what we do is plug in the controller. >> Ah. >> So we took these little guys off. We're going solder these guys back on, and you can just -- >> Solder it to this -- back on the board -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> So we took these off, and because we're going to relocate these somewhere else, just solder on three wires on to there and you can -- >> And these are any three wires, but just color coded them for power, ground -- >> Power, ground, signal. Yeah. And you actually don't even need to use that receptacle. If you're going build your controller into your case or something like that you can actually just get the three pins coming out of the controller that would normally plug into this guy, take off the connector, and just solder those three pins right onto the board itself. >> Now for the second controller, is it the -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> Is it on the opposite end or is it right next to it. >> It's on the same end, right next to it. There's actually -- let's see. There's six, eight, there's actually eight solder points, but two of them are actually only to hold the little plastic [Inaudible] little metal case that goes around what the solder is in. So you don't have to worry about that. You only have to worry about the six cables that these pins would fit into, and it's pretty obvious, you'll see where they go. >> Nice. >> And so let's see, we have this plugged in. We have our controller right here. So I just want to plug this in there. >> Oh. >> [Inaudible] game. >> So exciting. Having actually never owned an N 64 in my life. >> That is a problem, Roger. >> Well, maybe. >> All right, so -- let's see if we power it on. And we get it all -- >> Oh. >> So there we are. >> So let's point that up to the -- [Inaudible] screen there. Get it on. >> So you see the game is loading up all fine, and [Inaudible] -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> If I can do anything. Oops. I think it's working, I think it's working. >> It's working. >> You played this when you were six? >> Yeah. [Inaudible] press a Z. This little bird comes out of your back pack. [Inaudible] -- >> Oh, I see. Oh nice. [Inaudible] how long will this last on these batteries? >> With this system -- the set up of these batteries on the DVD player it will actually last [Inaudible] -- pause -- >> But yeah, so like if you were playing this, how long would you be able to get out of this entire unit? >> You can get around two hours off a battery pack, because the system itself draws a bit of current, the LCD doesn't draw much current at all. But with these battery packs they're somewhere around 2,000 milliamps each, I believe. I'm not sure about that, so don't quote me. But with a DVD player, they last around two hours, and some other people use these on Nintendo 64 systems with the PS1 screen and they got about two hours out of it. >> Okay, cool. So the rest of it is literally sliding it into the case. >> Yeah, just sliding it in, rearranging it, and we'll do that real quick so you can see what the finished unit looks like. >> Nice. >> But now that we tested it all outside the case, this is which is what you kind of want to do. Just make sure it all works before you tie it all up, screw it in, glue everything down, because then having to rework stuff is a real pain. >> Which is interesting, we actually did have an issue with the screen earlier, and originally we thought we fried the driver board. But it turns out it was just a fuse. But the fuse is actually a surface-mounted component, right? >> Yeah, yeah. So what happened is we somehow -- we shorted out something that was going into the screen. We shorted something out there and it blew the fuse. And it's this tiny 402 size service mount part which is -- you can only read under a microscope, you have to use tweezers to solder it on. What I did was just got a ball of solder, went over there, and then just heated up both sides of the fuse, took it off, and then put a little wiring in between it and just fill it up with solder. So we don't have the production of the fuse on the screen. So if we do short it out again, something bad could happen and we could mess up the actual components. But after we blew a fuse we were able to get it going again by just replacing that. >> Let's try popping this and see how well it packages into the case. >> All right. Let's do it. ^M00:29:50 [ Music ] ^M00:29:58 >> All right, so now we have the board in there. We want to plug these guys in, because both the game receiver and the little memory card comes right out. In our case we don't have enough space to completely enclose them, so we had to drill these little holes and auger out the material to get it to fit in. >> So all told, you've spent -- actually we collectively spent about, what, 200? >> Yeah. It was -- >> Less than 200, because the flat screen was about 50, 60 bucks, and the DVD player was about 40, 50 bucks. >> Yeah, somewhere around there. And then the Nintendo system was -- we get it on line for about 15 bucks or so. >> Yeah. >> And yeah, so it's all pretty cheap. And because the Nintendo is a pretty old system you probably have it around your own place or a friend -- >> You can get it real cheap. >> Yeah, you can get it real cheap. All right, now we got these guys plugged in. We have [Inaudible] and as you can see, we have our switch -- or a charging port. Which -- the charging port was actually just we took the power supply that was used for the DVD player and we just put the two connectors that were off -- this is actually off the screen for the Sony screen. But you can actually take off the connectors from the -- from the DVD player, and you have a matching receptacle. And then all you have to do is plug them in, and it will [Inaudible] the whole system, which is nice. So you don't have to carry this around with you, though, because it has a battery pack and you can run it all by itself. So let's just tuck some of these wires in here. >> Well, packaging, I mean, once you get it this far it's just a small matter of figuring out additional packaging design considerations. >> Yeah, it's all about just doing an elegant job at wiring everything together. You want to make sure that everything is soldered together really well, nothing's going to come off, and that all of your wiring is really nice and neat. In our case, it's not all nice and neat, it worked for now, but making a case you want to make -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> Probably pop -- if we were to do this, probably pop this as a maybe make an end cap for both ends, maybe drill -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> There's some really cases that people have made where they have C and C wooden [Inaudible] and they vacuum-formed sheets to go over it, and they have all the control ports on the side. >> And it's conceivable to take this actually out of this bezel and mount it directly on. >> Oh yeah, you can definitely take this off of the case itself. And you just need to relocate the buttons somehow or have some access to the buttons. In our case, we just glued the screen right on there. >> See if it turns on. >> All right, let's see. >> There it goes. >> So we have our whole Nintendo 64 unit in the -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> Let's just show them, there's no wires everywhere except for the controller. >> Exactly. The battery is all in there, and it's running just fine. >> That is so cool. Awesome. That is awesome work, dude. >> Thank you. >> Not only does he build segues he [Inaudible] N 64s. [ Music ] >> It's time now for our Netflix sponsored movie pick of the week. This week, the Wizard. This kid-friendly flick centers around three run away children as they travel to California so that the youngest, afflicted with a mental disorder that makes him emotionally withdrawn, can compete in the Nintendo world video game championships, featuring child stars Fred savage, Luke Edwards, and Jenny Lewis, who now fronts several Indie bands. The wizard is a fascinating take on Nintendo's almost omnipotent reign during the '80s and early '90s. And don't forget to check out the other 89,999 titles Netflix has to offer, including Blu-Ray. You're bound to find any title you're looking for. Plus with 40 shipping centers, almost all deliveries happen in just one business day. And shipping both ways is free. Plus if you're an Xbox Gold viewer, you can receive Netflix on your Xbox 360. That's right, no discs or mailbox required. Your movie is instantly streamed over your broad band connection straight to your Xbox 360. Plans start at $4.99, but as a system viewer you can get a free trial by signing up today at www.netflix.com/system. ^M00:34:02 [ Music ] ^M00:34:04 >> All right Danny, I think we're pretty much done. Any final words, any words of caution for people? >> Yeah, one thing that you would definitely want to consider is if you're carrying around this Nintendo 64 unit you could take the video out cable and the audio out cable that we plugged right into the screen, those three wires, it's the red -- right, left, and then the video, and you can make those into a -- you can solder on little connectors, RCA connectors, and actually plug that into a computer screen. >> So standard R C jack -- [ Multiple voices speaking ] >> And then you can plug them straight into a TV. >> Yeah. Exactly. So you can carry around an entire system and have it run off batteries, or bring the charger with you and just plug in the charger. And then -- >> Still be able to play -- >> Still be able to play it, and play it off the TV. And then you can have a whole Nintendo 64 unit that you can play on the train or in the car, and just stop at your friend's house and plug it in. >> Wow, that's pretty sweet. Awesome. All right. If you have any ideas, suggests, or comments about this project, or any previous project, please e-mail us, system@revision3.com, and don't forget to visit the form set at revision3.com/forms. And if you want to catch up on old episodes you can visit our archives at revision3.com/system. That's it for this show, I'm Roger change -- >> And I'm Danny Racubba [Assumed spelling]. >> Till next week, this has been System. ^M00:35:17 [ Music ]

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