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Canon EOS Rebel T4i

A fine camera, the Canon EOS Rebel T4i's more expensive 18-135mm STM kit (or body with another STM lens) is the only version that merits an unqualified recommendation. You can probably find better alternatives if you just want a sub-$1,000 dSLR for still photography.

Nikon D2X

Nikon D2X

Nikon D3400

Very good photo quality for its class plus performance fast enough to capture kids and pets make the Nikon D3400 A solid choice for a first dSLR.

Nikon D500

There's tons to like about the Nikon D500, from its fast shooting and excellent image quality to its broad feature set and streamlined design. But it still falls short with its Live View autofocus and seriously subpar wireless file transfer and shooting operation.

Nikon Coolpix S3100

The Nikon Coolpix S3100 is easy to carry, use and look at. But its image quality is pretty average, and you don't have to look hard to find other cameras that offer more features for less money.

Fujifilm FinePix J100

The Fujifilm Finepix J100 is so simple we almost feel patronised by it. There are a few quirks in the face detection and red-eye system, but the prominence of baby mode suggests this isn't a camera for the party scene. We'd even call it the consummate point-and-shoot, simply because you can't do anything else with it

Casio Exilim EX-Z19

The Casio Exilim EX-Z19 is extremely tweakable for such an affordable camera, but remains underwhelming in terms of specs and features. Still, the build quality, ease of use and decent images make it a solid bargain

Canon PowerShot SX260

The Canon PowerShot SX260 HS' wider, longer lens, a few much-needed design tweaks and excellent photo quality add up to one pretty great compact superzoom.

Swann PenCam

Channel your inner Maxwell Smart, Agent 99 or John Steed with this pen that doubles as a camera. But don't expect to be as undercover as the real deal.

Olympus Tough TG-810

Tough as old boots and about as heavy to match, the TG-810 is packed to the brim with features to complement its waterproof credentials. Just don't expect the GPS to work as promised.

Olympus Pen Mini E-PM1

Geared towards point-and-shoot upgrade users, the Olympus Pen Mini E-PM1 offers a great introduction to the world of interchangeable lens cameras. There are a few usability issues that we'd like to see resolved for the next version, though.

Sony Alpha SLT-A33

A great entry-level digital SLR, the A33 offers fast shooting speeds and very good image quality for most intents and purposes.

Editors' Choice

Samsung EX2F

The Samsung EX2F is a great professional-grade compact camera. Samsung has married a cluster of manual controls to some well-considered menus in a first-class piece of hardware design. Image quality is hard to fault, with plenty of detail, accurate colours and good low-light performance, all at a very tempting price.

Olympus VG-170

At just £80, the VG-170 is a very inexpensive camera, particularly when you consider its resolution, size and smart features. Unfortunately, its performance is a let-down, with noise appearing in too many of our test shots.

Editors' Choice

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ48

With a lens of which most dSLR users could only dream, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ48 is one of the most versatile and powerful cameras you could hope to pick up for less than £300. A sterling performer throughout our tests, its output more than lives up to the promise of its specs.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS5

A slow burner of a camera, the Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS5's wide-angle lens caught our eye, despite some pedestrian styling. The more we used it, the more we fell in love with it as we uncovered yet more flexible options, making this accessible point-and-shoot another quiet triumph for Panasonic

Samsung ST30

If you want a cheap, simple and small digital camera, and you're happy to accept some compromise in terms of features and image quality, the Samsung ST30 is a pretty good option.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS11

The Panasonic Lumix DMC-FS11 is another solidly built, pocket-friendly entry to the Lumix range. It couldn't be simpler to use, but more manual controls would help it avoid the common compact-camera problem of struggling with noise in low light

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