Children who grew up on an estate with a name won't have access to Rolls-Royce's one-of-one ride-on toy.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

It's going straight to the St. Richard's Hospital Pediatric Day Surgery Unit in England.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

This toy is built for children who are going to surgery, so they can drive themselves to the operating theater.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

The idea is that this will help lower the child's stress levels ahead of surgery.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce's in-house Bespoke Manufacturing wing spent over 400 hours of their own time building the SRH.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

To commemorate the SRH's build, Rolls-Royce brought two children and their families to Goodwood Studio, where they received the same VIP treatment that car buyers do.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

The project team used 3D printing to create parts like the paddle controls and the Spirit of Ecstasy.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

The children also took drives on the production line, which is usually reserved for the CEO during new vehicle development.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

It'll go up to 10 mph, but it can be set to max out at 4, which is probably safer inside a hospital.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

I'm not crying. You're the one who's crying.

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce SRH for Saint Richard's Hospital, Chichester. Photographed at Rolls-Royce factory, Goodwood, UK. Photo: James Lipman / jameslipman.com

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce

Rolls-Royce SRH for Saint Richard's Hospital, Chichester. Photographed at Rolls-Royce factory, Goodwood, UK. Photo: James Lipman / jameslipman.com

Published:
Photo by: Rolls-Royce
Latest Galleries See all

HOLIDAY GIFT GUIDE 2017

Cameras that make great holiday gifts

Let them start the new year with a step up in photo and video quality from a phone.

Latest From Roadshow