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Amazon Kindle Oasis 2019

The Paperwhite remains the better overall value, but the updated Kindle Oasis secures its position as the best e-reader if price is no object.

Amazon Kindle Voyage

The Kindle Voyage is Amazon's best e-reader to date, and probably the best e-reader ever -- but it doesn't come cheap.

Editors' Choice
$129.99 at Amazon

Amazon Kindle Paperwhite 2018

The latest version of the Kindle Paperwhite White is more durable, fully dunkable and ultimately the best Kindle reader for most people -- especially if you snag it during one of Amazon's frequent sales.

Kobo Vox

While it's relatively affordable, the Kobo Vox is a truly unexceptional Android tablet, with nothing to recommend it over the identically priced Kindle Fire.

Sony Reader Touch Edition PRS-600

While it's an improvement to the company's previous touch-screen model, Sony's Reader Touch Edition PRS-600 is saddled with a screen that's short on contrast and prone to glare--and it lacks the wireless convenience of Amazon's identically priced Kindle.

Amazon Kindle second generation

While it's short of perfection--and remains fairly pricey--the Amazon Kindle 2's improved design, built-in wireless capabilities, and user-friendly interface keep it atop the e-book reader heap in the U.S.

Kobo Aura H2O

Kobo's new e-book reader is designed for reading in the bath, by the pool or waiting grimly in the rain for your bus.

Kobo eReader

The Kobo eReader isn't a bad little basic e-book reader, but it's just not a compelling deal now that the more full-featured Barnes & Noble Nook has matched its low price.

Kobo Mini

The affordable Kobo Mini is a likable touch-screen e-ink e-reader that's too small for some and not quite small enough for others.

Amazon Kindle global wireless, 2009 version

While the new internationalized Kindle looks exactly like the earlier U.S.-only model, this e-reader, which uses AT&T's data network for wireless access, represents an incremental improvement to the Kindle line--just as serious competition is ramping up in the e-book market.

Sony Digital Paper DPT-RP1

Sony's second-generation DPT-RP1 features a crisper display, slightly slimmer design and a more responsive touchscreen.

Barnes & Noble Nook first generation

The Nook Wi-Fi doesn't quite measure up to the Kindle in terms of design and overall performance, but it's a worthy alternative if you're looking for a more open e-reader that supports the EPUB format.

Amazon Kindle first generation

With its free built-in wireless capabilities and PC-free operation, Amazon's Kindle holds a distinct advantage over Sony's Reader and is a promising evolution of the electronic book--but Amazon needs to bring down the pricing for both the device and the content to attract a wider audience.

Barnes & Noble Nook Color

Barnes & Noble's Nook Color is a capable color touch-screen e-book reader that offers much of the functionality of an Android tablet for half the price of an iPad.

Editors' Choice
$139.00 MSRP

Amazon Kindle Touch 2011

The Kindle Touch is Amazon's best e-reader to date.

Kobo Touch

Though the Kobo eReader Touch Edition doesn't quite measure up to the Nook Touch or the Kindle, it's a respectable and affordable touch-screen e-reader with a lot of pluses.

Sony Reader Daily Edition PRS-950SC silver

Sony's flagship e-reader, the Daily Edition PRS-950, is a capable, well-designed e-reader that offers both Wi-Fi and 3G connectivity--but at $300, it's too expensive.

Kobo Glo

The Kobo Glo is an excellent Kindle alternative, especially for readers seeking EPUB compatibility and international options.

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