As a followup to 2017's Concept-i, the Japanese automaker debuted the Toyota LQ ahead of the auto show later this month.

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Unlike the Concept-i, the LQ appears far more grounded in its approach -- and it will be ready for public trials next year.

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Although the LQ, a Level 4 self-driving car, looks a lot like the Concept-i, it does arrive with very, very slight tweaks. The front fascia is largely the same with headlights hidden behind the front bumper. 

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Toyota says it can also project numerous different shapes onto the road ahead for drivers, passengers and pedestrians, thanks to a million little mirrors embedded inside.

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The rear showcases more of a curve to the wildly styled brake lights. The same triangular pattern from the Concept-i remains as well, though the figures don't look as much like the shape of an airplane than before.

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What gets toned down is the body-covered rear wheels. They're still around, but they appear far less dramatic than before.

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If you need more proof this thing will start running about Japanese streets, take a look at the interior.

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Unlike the Concept-i's minimalist look, the LQ has a full interior complete with a traditional steering wheel; it introduces us to our new artificial intelligence friend, Yui.

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With the coming of LQ, it will likely take over duty from the Concept-i as one of many mobility options prepared for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

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