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Shell's Eco-marathon serves up super cool futuristic cars

The car race features student teams from 18 countries competing in a race to see whose car is more fuel efficient.

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Aloysius Low
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1 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The Shell Eco-marathon took place at the Changi Exhibition Center in Singapore, and the weather was sunny and terribly hot. 

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2 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The cars go round the track really slowly, using a method called "coast and burn" to save on fuel. 

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3 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

Overtaking on the track can be done either on the left or the right, but you'll have to blast your horn to do so. 

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4 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

It's quite the tight fit for most, so some teams use female drivers (though we can't confirm if the person driving in this one is female).

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5 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

If you're wondering just how small the cars are, here's another look.

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6 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The Eco-marathon is all about fuel efficiency, so it's no surprise that the race is mostly quiet until the engine turns on for a brief burst of speed. 

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7 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

This Shell Prototype is a reference car that requires the driver to be lying down. 

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8 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

You'll have to lie down to fit.

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9 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

You'll have to squeeze your legs all the way in, so if you're of a bigger size, this will be difficult. 

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10 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The engine's from a motorcycle, and each vehicle is loaded with a tiny amount of fuel -- around 20ml. 

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11 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

When fully closed, the Prototype aims to be as aerodynamic as possible. 

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12 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The UrbanConcept wouldn't feel out of place next to a normal car, but it will be a lot smaller. 

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13 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

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14 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The inside of the Shell UrbanConcept reference resembles a normal car.

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15 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

The Nanyang Technological University's 3D printed car uses hydrogen as fuel.

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16 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

To cut down on weight, the insides of the car uses a honeycomb structure for strength. 

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17 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

Here's another UrbanConcept car that looks quite different from Shell's reference car. 

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18 of 18 Aloysius Low/CNET

Teams getting ready to head out to the track with their cars.

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