The Flextreme represents Opel's idea for a small, practical transporter with very low emissions, a major theme among carmakers at the 2007 Frankfurt auto show. Notable features are the transparent roof and the headlight enclosures, which wrap all the way down to the fog lights.

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Yes, those are two Segways, stored in special compartments at the rear of the car. Opel's idea is that you may want to continue low-emission travel after you stop the car. The rear gates also swing out in a fashion Opel dubbed FlexLoad.

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FlexDoors, more commonly called suicide doors, open up to allow easy access to the rear seats. The seats themselves use pedestal mounts and thin materials to save on internal space.

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In good concept car style, the Flextreme uses a noncircular steering wheel anchored by only two spokes on its lower edge.

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Opel had a number of Segways available for people to play around with at the show, to help get into the spirit of the car.

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Near the Flextreme exhibit, GM had an example of its E-Flex architecture. This system, first seen in the Chevy Volt concept, uses electric motors to drive the wheels, which get their electricity from big lithium-ion batteries. The batteries can be charged by plugging into the grid and from an onboard independent power source. In the case of the Flextreme, that would be a 1.3-liter turbo diesel generator.

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