Step 1: Mount the camera

Start by removing the screws that hold your license plate in place, then use those same screws to affix the Magellan camera unit to the top of the plate.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
1
of 14

Optional: secure the camera

We left the standard Phillips screwdriver compatible screws in place, but cautious owners may want to switch to a screw head that's less accessible to the common thief. I'd recommend checking your local hardware store for pin-in-hex types.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
2
of 14

Step 2: route the camera's cables

The camera protrudes slightly from its mounting surface and may cause conflicts with certain license plate frames. Next, we need to route the cables.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
3
of 14

Every model is different

I was able to squeeze the camera's cable through a tiny opening behind this bit of plastic trim and into the cabin of our test car. Your vehicle will no doubt present its own challenges, so don't be afraid to poke around and get creative.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
4
of 14

Step 3: locate a reversing light

With the camera in place, we turn our attention to the transmitter box, which needs power. Locate the one of the reverse lights on the back of your vehicle and expose the wires that power it. On our test car, we partially removed the passenger side rear light cluster to find those cables (the long, thin black and white pair near the center of the photo).

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
5
of 14

Step 4: prep the transmitter box

Now locate the transmitter box that shipped with your Wireless Back-Up Camera. This unit features two pre-stripped power cables that need to be connected to the reverse light's power.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
6
of 14

Steps 5 - 7: tap the reverse light's power

Start by locking the supplied wire taps around the positive and negative power cables (1) for the reverse light by squeezing the taps with a pair of pliers. Next, using a wire crimper (2) attach the supplied spade connectors to the exposed ends of the transmitter box's power leads (3). Then simply connect the spade connectors to the wire taps.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
7
of 14

A clean connection

The red (positive) cable connects to the white power wire and the black (ground) connects to the black grounded connection on the vehicle. The result is a clean connection that's easy to reverse if you ever find the need to.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
8
of 14

Step 8: connect the camera to the transmitter

Finally, secure all excess wire using zip ties (not included) and make the connections between the camera and the transmitter. There are only two to make: power and video.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
9
of 14

Step 9: put your car back together

Put your reverse lights back into place and reattach any body panels that you may have removed during installation.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
10
of 14

Step 10: Attach the receiver to the Roadmate 9055-LM

Inside the vehicle, the Wireless Back-Up Camera's receiver attaches to the back of the Magellan 9055-LM's cradle with a tongue-in-groove slotted connection. The unit also includes a new two-headed power cable that allows both the camera's receiver and the GPS device to be powered from one outlet.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
11
of 14

Step 11: double check your work

Place the vehicle into reverse gear and double check that your reverse lights still work. You'll probably want a third party to help here, lest you accidentally back over yourself.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
12
of 14

Step 12: test the display

Inside the vehicle, the receiver box should sense that the camera and transmitter are broadcasting and automatically switch the 9055-LM's screen to display the rear view.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
13
of 14

All done!

And like that you're all done. Adjust the camera vertically to your liking by grabbing the lens and twisting. Once installed properly, the system should require no direct interaction on the part of the driver beyond the act of shifting into reverse.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Antuan Goodwin/CNET
14
of 14
Up Next

How to connect an Android phone to your car with Bluetooth