The 2017 Honda Ridgeline's styling is markedly more conservative than its predecessor, a reality that makes accessorizing it seemingly more attractive.

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This example has been tubed top and bottom, with a new roof rack and die-cast running boards.

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18-inch all-terrain Yokohama Geolandar tires are fitted to machine-surfaced and gloss-painted Black Glint alloy wheels.

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The Ridgeline may have its own lockable, watertight in-bed storage, but tonneau covers are always a popular pickup accessory.

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With aggressive daytime running lamps and fog lamps, the front end of the Ridgeline didn't need much butching up.

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The second-generation Ridgeline holds on to its trick dual-hinged tailgate that flops down like a traditional pickup or swings off to one side.

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Yep, these are Honda Genuine Accessory running boards.

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A display of Honda Ridgeline accessories at the Chicago Auto Show.

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An accessory skid plate adds underbelly protection.

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Black fender flares simultaneously add sheetmetal protection and a little attitude.

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Honda's first-generation Ridgeline was something of a slow-burn model. It stuck around for nearly a decade, largely unchanged, selling in small numbers. Will the new one receive more regular updates and be a better seller?

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