This isn't a whole new generation of MDX -- it's just a mid-lifecycle refresh.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
1
of 37

The rear end features significantly fewer updates than the front does.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
2
of 37

The most notable change is the removal of Acura's much-maligned "beak" grille.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
3
of 37

The side profile remains relatively the same.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
4
of 37

Out back, there are new integrated tailpipes and some slight aesthetic adjustments.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
5
of 37

But there's another big update -- one you can't actually see.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
6
of 37

The MDX now features a sport-oriented hybrid setup.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
7
of 37

The hybrid drivetrain mates a 3.0-liter V-6 and a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission to electric motors.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
8
of 37

Not only does this make it a hybrid, it also grants the car all-wheel drive.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
9
of 37

The hybrid's net output is 325 horsepower, up from the non-hybrid's 290.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
10
of 37

Sadly, the complicated hybrid system does add some weight to the equation.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
11
of 37

Thankfully, fuel economy is still higher than the gas-powered MDX, despite the additional heft.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
12
of 37

Acura believes its hybrid will improve fuel economy by 7 mpg over the gas model, to 25 mpg city and 26 mpg highway.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
13
of 37

Gratuitous tailpipe shot!

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
14
of 37

If you're a fan of safety systems, you're going to love the MDX.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
15
of 37

Instead of charging you some insane amount of money for safety systems, every MDX comes standard with Acura's entire suite.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
16
of 37

The now-standard AcuraWatch includes forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, lane-departure warning, lane-keep assist and adaptive cruise control.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
17
of 37

That's a whole lot of safety, and it's all baked into the window's sticker price!

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
18
of 37

The door handles are as shiny as ever.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
19
of 37

Do you know what MDX stands for? Because we don't.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
20
of 37

Hell, Acura probably doesn't know what MDX stands for.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
21
of 37

Need to shift? All you need to do is press a button.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
22
of 37

Speaking of buttons, the steering wheel is lousy with 'em.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
23
of 37

Acura's two-tier infotainment system, half of which is touch-capable, isn't going anywhere.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
24
of 37

Interior material quality looks nice, and it feels quite nice, as well.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
25
of 37

That's some very fancy wood grain, right there.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
26
of 37

Here's proof that its rear doors are functional.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
27
of 37

And here's proof that its rear seats exist and look quite comfortable!

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
28
of 37

There's plenty of trunk space for whatever you need to shove back there.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
29
of 37

Golf clubs, suitcases, corpses -- they'll all fit, maybe not at the same time, though.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
30
of 37

And, like every other Acura, there's plenty of chrome scattered about.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
31
of 37

Tailpipes, tailgate...anything with tail in the name has some chrome.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
32
of 37

Except the taillights, because chrome taillights would be a bit much.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
33
of 37

There's a new wheel design available, as well, because that's probably one of the easiest things to change.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
34
of 37

All in all, the MDX is a fair bit more attractive than it was before.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
35
of 37

You won't be missed, beak.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
36
of 37

What you see here is the future of Acura's design language.

View Local Inventory
Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNET
37
of 37
Up Next

2020 Toyota Yaris Hatchback: Mazda2, is that you?