Nissan had no qualms about using tech to gain performance when it launched this generation of GT-R in 2007. For the 2012 model year, Nissan made a number of improvements, such as upping the horsepower and tuning the launch control system.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
Every line and vent on the body is functional, but Nissan figured the GT-R badges wouldn't add too much weight or drag.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The design changed little for the 2012 model year, although the air intakes are bigger.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The engine is a work of art, hand-built by Nissan engineers. It uses twin turbos to generate 530 horsepower from its six cylinders.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The GT-R has comfortable sport seats for the front passengers with high bolsters to keep you planted. The rear seats are much smaller, but usable.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The door handles lie flush with the body, decreasing drag.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The GT-R's Brembo brakes offer excellent modulation. Never grabby, it is easy to apply partial braking to shave off some speed.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The electronically controlled suspension has three settings, but even in Comfort mode is never soft.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
There is a decent amount of room in the trunk, although the opening to it is on the small side.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The cabin of the GT-R does not exude luxury, but has some nice materials.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The GT-R's handling is beyond excellent. It stays steady in the sharpest curves.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The six speed dual clutch transmission is a miracle of modern technology, shifting with no lag whatsoever.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The performance computer and navigation system come standard with the GT-R.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
Like any dedicated sports car, the tachometer is front and center. The speedometer, off to the left, goes up to 220 mph.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The audio controls and voice command button are surprisingly civilized on such a powerful car.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
These three switches let you put the transmission, suspension, and traction control in Race mode.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The performance computer has seven preset and four custom views, which let you monitor every aspect of the GT-R.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The navigation system is good, with maps stored on hard drive, but we would like to see more topographical details, which would be useful when driving mountain roads.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The phone system integrates Bluetooth phones, making contact lists available through voice command and on-screen.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The iPod integration can show album art in the interface.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
Typical for iPod integration is this music library view.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
The Bose audio system has 11 speakers, including these two subwoofers between the rear seats.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET
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