These days most of Mitsubishi's lineup shares the Lancer platform and corporate grille that debuted with the Evo X. However, the Outlander GT has a bit more in common with the Evo than most.

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In GT trim, the Outlander is equipped with Mitsubishi's S-AWC system. This isn't just shared branding. The Outlander GT and Evolution X share many of the same technologies.

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An active center differential (ACD) is able to shift up to 50 percent of available torque to the rear axle on demand.

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The Evo's AYC torque-vectoring system has been moved to the Outlander's front axle, making it the only vehicle on the market to feature a front-axle active differential.

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The Outlander's S-AWC system isn't as sharp as the Evo's, but its front-axle AYC makes it feel more stable up to its generous handling limits.

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Unfortunately, providing the power to the S-AWC system is Mitsubishi's underwhelming 3.0-liter V-6. Torque delivery isn't what we'd call disappointing, but it hardly lives up to the sporty promise of the GT badge.

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Also hampering the Outlander GT's performance is the six-speed automatic transmission, which emphasizes shifting smoothness over speed.

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Out back, the Outlander features a split tailgate for easy loading and much more hauling space than the Outlander Sport.

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However, there's still not a ton of space in the Outlander's rear hatch.

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The space is particularly compromised with the third-row seat in the upright position.

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Inside, the Outlander's cabin is standard Mitsubishi Lancer equipment.

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The Outlander's steering wheel features metallic paddle shifters attached to its steering columns.

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Audio controls, voice commands, and cruise controls also populate the steering wheel's various surfaces.

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The Outlander's instrumentation is simple and easy to read, with a small LCD between two analog gauges.

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When equipped with the navigation package, the Outlander gains a 40GB hard-drive-based GPS system.

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Maps are clear enough to read without issue, but don't feature 3D data or a three-quarters view. Top-down is all you get. Hyundai does the same with 8GB of solid storage.

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What Mitsubishi offers that Hyundai doesn't is that you can also rip audio to a MusicServer partition on the 40GB hard drive.

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Satellite radio, Bluetooth audio streaming, and USB and iPod integration round out the digital audio sources.

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There's also an odd RCA analog audio/video input for connecting audio players, video players, or gaming systems.

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When paired with a compatible Bluetooth phone, the Mitsubishi system will sync your address book and support voice commands for phone calls using its FUSE system.

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There are also dozens of other oddball features hidden in Mitsubishi's touch-screen interface, such as this maintenance computer.

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