The Genesis Coupe R-Spec trim level gets all of the Track level's performance upgrades, but at a lower cost.

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Hyundai manages to keep the R-Spec's MSRP low by limiting the cabin tech and comfort upgrades.

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Under the hood is a 3.8-liter V-6 that outputs more than 300 horsepower.

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Hyundai doesn't hide its engine under fancy plastic shrouding. What you see is what you get.

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Fuel economy is EPA estimated at 17 city and 26 highway, but with a heavy foot you could do much worse.

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Power flows through a single-option manual transmission, which we found to be a bit rough around the edges.

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Torque exits the vehicle at the rear axle--as it should on a sports car--and is split between the rear wheels with a Torsen limited slip differential.

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The Genesis Coupe has a longer wheelbase than the Nissan 370Z Coupe, which means that it must be more stiffly sprung to match the Nissan's handling.

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However, the longer Hyundai seats four--two more than the Nissan can claim.

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Big Brembo brakes at all four corners help haul the R-Spec to a hasty halt.

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Inside the cabin, the R-Spec is limited to Hyundai's basic cabin tech offering. Fortunately, that's not such a bad thing.

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Bluetooth hands-free calling is standard on the Genesis Coupe, even at the R-Spec level.

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The Bluetooth system features address book sync and basic voice command. Simply tell it who you want to call and the Hyundai will make the call.

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As part of the Bluetooth system, the R-Spec also gets A2DP stereo audio streaming, which makes it a great car for those who want to use a smartphone for navigation or Internet radio.

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The R-Spec's steering is very direct, communicating every bump and rut in the road up through the driver's fingertips. Which is great during sport driving, but a bit annoying during daily drives.

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USB and iPod connectivity are standard thanks to included USB and auxiliary inputs.

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For full iPod/iPhone control, you'll need to add a 30-pin dock connector cable for $35.

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Instrumentation is a basic two-gauge affair with a small monochromatic trip computer located in the center.

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XM Satellite Radio rounds out the R-Spec's surprisingly full-featured (for a stripped-down trim level) cabin tech package.

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