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FCA Airflow Vision concept greets CES with a futuristic interior

The company says this concept previews "future premium design."

This is the automaker's premium design of the future.

Andrew Krok/Roadshow
This story is part of CES 2020, our complete coverage of the showroom floor and the hottest new tech gadgets around.

Fiat Chrysler is largely using CES 2020 to show off three plug-in hybrid Jeep models and a new "4xe" badge, but there's more. The automaker is also showing off this stunning concept: the Airflow Vision concept.

There's no brand attached to the design study and the grille simply reads "Airflow" on the front. It's easy to see a little bit of Jeep Grand Cherokee influence in the nose, though the rear is very Aston Martin-like. FCA did share it uses the "dimensions and flat load floor" of a Chrysler Pacifica plug-in hybrid. Perhaps it previews a future Jeep in some way, but all FCA shared was the fact it previews "future premium design." The real story is inside, however.

There, FCA designers poured their love and creativity into a futuristic user experience (UX) system. It's supposed to convey how future technologies will let drivers and passengers interact with the wild tech. Ahead of the driver is a simple screen that doesn't block any of the view ahead.

To the right is the center stack that features a large center screen and a second screen below it that tilts upward slightly. The photo depicts it showing the navigation map, but that's hardly the screen I'd want to look at while driving.

Good news then, because the multiple screens can display a wide variety of information. And if you want to pass something to another passenger, swipe the screen in their direction -- it'll land on a screen in front of them. That includes the front passenger seat, which also houses a couple of displays where we'd typically find interior trim today.

Screens can also be grouped and personalized based on the person sitting in front of them. Taking it all in, this isn't a very far-fetched representation of things to come. 

Originally published Jan. 2.
Update, Jan. 7: Adds new photos and information.