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Automobili Pininfarina names its all-electric hypercar Battista

The car will cost between $2 and $2.5 million when it launches in 2020.

Pininfarina Battista

The car formerly known as the PF0 now has a name.

Pininfarina

Automobili Pininfarina has picked a name for its forthcoming all-electric hypercar, which was heretofore known only as the PF0. It'll be called "Battista," a reference to the founder of the Carrozzeria Pininfarina, Battista "Pinin" Farina. The car is slated to make its public debut at the 2019 Geneva Motor Show.

"My grandfather always had the vision that one day there would be a stand-alone range of Pininfarina-branded cars," Pininfarina SpA chairman Paolo Pininfarina said in a statement. "For me, we simply had to call it Battista."

pf0-prototype-high

An earlier teaser photo of the all-electric car.

Automobili Pininfarina

Though so far we've only seen teaser photos and the above image of the Pininfarina Battista under a sheet, the company has released some details about the new model. It's claimed to have 1,900 horsepower and 1,696 pound-feet of torque, with a 0-to-62-miles-per-hour sprint of "less than two seconds" and a top speed of 250 mph. An all-electric car, the Battista is also claimed to have a 300-mile driving range on a single charge.

Powertrain technology will come from electric carmaker Rimac Automobili, while the car will be produced in Cambiano, Italy. A total of 150 Battistas will be built starting in 2020, with the car's priced expected to be $2-$2.5 million. Pininfarina says that 50 of those cars will be allocated for US buyers, 50 will go to Europe and the remaining 50 will be destined for the Middle East and Asian markets.

Pininfarina's eco race car runs on hydrogen (pictures)

See all photos
jake-holmes
jake-holmes
Jake Holmes Reviews Editor
While studying traditional news journalism in college, Jake realized he was smitten by all things automotive and wound up with an internship at Car and Driver. That led to a career writing news, review and feature stories about all things automotive at Automobile Magazine, most recently at Motor1. When he's not driving, fixing or talking about cars, he's most often found on a bicycle.
Jake Holmes
While studying traditional news journalism in college, Jake realized he was smitten by all things automotive and wound up with an internship at Car and Driver. That led to a career writing news, review and feature stories about all things automotive at Automobile Magazine, most recently at Motor1. When he's not driving, fixing or talking about cars, he's most often found on a bicycle.

Updated Dec. 11, 2018 7:51 a.m. PT

jake-holmes
Written by  Jake Holmes
CNET staff -- not advertisers, partners or business interests -- determine how we review the products and services we cover. If you buy through our links, we may get paid. Reviews ethics statement
jake-holmes
Jake Holmes Reviews Editor
While studying traditional news journalism in college, Jake realized he was smitten by all things automotive and wound up with an internship at Car and Driver. That led to a career writing news, review and feature stories about all things automotive at Automobile Magazine, most recently at Motor1. When he's not driving, fixing or talking about cars, he's most often found on a bicycle.
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