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Robots on the rise

In 2017, we met quite a few robot helpers. In years past, a robot was something you'd find in a factory, an experimental device in a lab or a cool pipe dream at a trade show. This year, we finally saw a plethora of functioning humanoid robots actually designed for consumers. Take a look at these friendly faces and find out the ways a humanoid robot can help around the house. 

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Mayfield Robotics Kuri

With the personality of a Pixar character, Kuri can roam your halls on its wheels, and keep on eye on the kids and your pets with the security cams hidden behind its eyes. 

It's due out this December, in the US only at first. Kuri will cost $800, which converts to roughly £600 and AU$1,000.

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Jibo

Another robot that aims to be both cute and useful, Jibo can dance and answer your questions with its built-in voice assistant that offers a lot of the same functionality as Amazon's Alexa

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Jibo

Jibo is a stationary bot that looks around with its animated eye. It can follow you as you move through a room, and look at you as you ask a question. Jibo reacts to touch as well, so go ahead and pet it if it gives a good answer to your question.

Jibo dances and shakes on its base, and its voice assistant will respond to your questions. 

You can order a Jibo right now for a hefty $900 (roughly £690 or AU$1,170). 

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Ubtech Robotics Lynx

Like Jibo, Lynx can dance. Plus, this little guy can strike a pose and teach you yoga. 

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Ubtech Robotics Lynx

Better yet, Lynx has Amazon's assistant Alexa built in, so you'll be able to use it to control your smart home and set a timer so you know when you can stop holding that downward dog pose. 

Lynx will cost a not insignificant $800 to $1,000 when it comes out later this year. (£610 to £760 and AU$1,000 to AU$1,300)

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Bosch Mykie

If you need some help in the kitchen, Bosch's Mykie might be the robot for you. 

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Bosch Mykie

Say the word and Mykie will lead you through a recipe and even control your Bosch connected appliances. 

We met Mykie at CES this January and haven't heard much since, but the concept still has us intrigued. 

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Qihan Sanbot Nano

Like Kuri, the Sanbot Nano can roam your floors and keep an eye on your home. It's just under 3 feet tall with roughly 50 sensors to help it navigate around objects. 

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Qihan Sanbot Nano

The Nano is due out very soon. Qihan hopes the product will be available in retail stores this year. 

Plus, the Nano will come with Alexa built in to help it hit the ground running (or at least rolling) when it comes to understanding your voice commands.

This roaming robot won't come cheap. It'll retail for $2,800 (about £2,100, AU$3,600). 

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LG Hub Robot

Like Jibo, LG's Hub Robot can turn to face you and answer your questions. With Amazon's Alexa built in, the LG bot should be able to control your smart home as well as search the web and set a timer. Plus, it'll be able to control LG smart appliances. 

LG's friendly helper doesn't have a price or release date yet. 

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Ewaybot MoRo

Unlike the rest of the bots in this gallery, MoRo can both grasp and manipulate objects. Its price also stretches beyond what would be realistic for most consumers. MoRo (or mobile robot) from Ewaybot will cost an eye-popping $30,000 (roughly £23,000 and AU$39,000). 

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Ewaybot MoRo

MoRo might not be affordable for most consumers, but with the ability to grip and move objects, it's a step toward a fully functioning robot butler. 

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MiRo

While not exactly humanoid, MiRo roams like Kuri and responds to touch like Jibo. 

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MiRo

MiRo is primarily designed to help senior citizens live independently longer. 

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Sony Aibo

More of a toy than a robot helper, Sony is bringing back Aibo, complete with plenty of new tricks. 

Aibo will only be available in Japan and will cost around 198,000 yen (approximately $1,700, £1,300, AU$2,250). 

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