CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

For over a month now the subways of New York City have been plastered with posters advertising the "Future of Everything Festival," so naturally I just had to see what sorts of newfangled robots and AI were housed in the show. I wasn't alone, the line to get in stretched way down the block.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
1
of 14

The show floor was relatively small at this speaker-heavy tech conference, and a number of products were things that have been out on the market for a year or more, but there were a few interesting items to share with you.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
2
of 14

Segway's Drift W1 E-skates (currently selling at $469) had a hands-on demo and mini-rink for people to try them out.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
3
of 14

Unsurprisingly, it appeared that balancing on two miniature scooters and somehow directing their speeds is not that easy the first time you try it?

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
4
of 14

The most popular booth in the show seemed to be Beyond Meat, where attendees could try samples of its plant-based burger, as well as its upcoming release, a crumbly ground-meat product shown here.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
5
of 14

Their free samples were flying off the table as fast as they could top the corn chips with spicy fake meat and cheese. Verdict? Worth the wait!

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
6
of 14

For those of you who are into ultra-modernist cuisine, the chef-designed centrifuge is finally a thing now. It's called a Spinzall and you can buy one for around $799.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
7
of 14

Kiki, the face-watching, emotion-detecting companion robot, was on display. We got a look at her earlier this year at CES 2019, too.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
8
of 14

The designers at Wearable Media explained to me that these are ready-to-wear fashions with embedded lighting that can sync with music or other sound.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
9
of 14

If you have an iPhone X or other face-mapping phone you may be able to have custom-fit masks printed to fit your face perfectly.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
10
of 14

Neutrogena's MaskiD app will first detect the contours of your face. 

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
11
of 14

You can customize the contents of your mask based on what you want to target in each area:  forehead wrinkles?  There's an app for that.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
12
of 14

We also saw Proctor and Gamble's makeup or "skincare" printing device back at CES.  Claire Reilly tried it out on video.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
13
of 14

And for those of you who need to track and have health data on everything all the time, you may want to try Epicore's sweat patches and analysis tools. The future is now.

Read First Take
Published:Caption:Photo:Sarah Tew/CNETDisclosure:We may get a commission from retail offers.
14
of 14
Up Next

Incredibly expensive things you can buy on Amazon