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Art of the Brick: DC Superheroes, a new exhibit on display in London, showcases classic comic heroes like Wonder Woman, Batman and Superman built from millions of Lego bricks.

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Wonder Woman heads up the Justice League.

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Lego artist Nathan Sawaya, a former lawyer, created the statues of the iconic DC heroes.

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Wonder Woman, now a star of the big screen, leads the way. 

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The Caped Crusader, Batman.

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Superman, the Man of Steel. Or should that be Man of Lego? 

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The Flash in action.

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The Green Lantern's all-powerful power ring, made from translucent green bricks to capture that ethereal glow.

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The famous green lantern itself, source of the green-tinged hero's powers.

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A Lego version of Action Comics No. 1, the very first DC comic.

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Sawaya turns the two-dimensional artwork into a 3D sculpture.

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Aquaman, who will also soon show up in the movies (but looking a bit different to this, his comics appearance).

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A Lego version of a classic cover: The Brave and the Bold No. 28, from the 1950s.

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The Brave and the Bold brought to life.

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Batman's sidekick, Robin.

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More than 2 million bricks went into the exhibition. 

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There are 8,000 bricks in each of these tubes alone.

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The Dark Knight returns, in 22,024 bricks.

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Various versions of the heroes are on display. This statue of Wonder Woman is life-size, standing nearly 2 meters (6.5 feet) tall and made from 16,586 bricks.

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The Green Lantern first appeared in 1940.

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The Green Lantern uses his ring.

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Cyborg, one of the lesser-known DC heroes.

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Nathan Sawaya's signature artwork is this Lego figure baring his soul -- except it seems a certain clown prince of crime has left his mark on the art... 

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Aquaman in his natural habitat.

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Not all heroes wear capes... This one does, obviously.

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The flowing cape meant this was one of the hardest sculptures to make.

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Quick as a Flash. Or should that be brick as a Flash?

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You'll believe a (Lego) man can fly...

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Did you know Superman's glowing heat vision officially became one of his powers only in the 1960s? Before that he had only X-ray sight.

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An abstract imagining of Wonder Woman.

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Superman in action.

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The Flash first appeared in 1939.

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Krypto the superdog, canine crusader.

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Wonder Woman's invisible plane (honest).

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Aquaman (and friend).

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Two sides of the same coin: Batman and the Joker.

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Why so serious?

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These rainbow-coloured Batman cowls are based on a colourful classic story in Detective Comics No. 241.

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To the Batmobile! Batman's ride in the camp classic 1966-68 TV show, based on a Lincoln Futura concept car of the 1950s. 

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This huge Batmobile is 5.5 meters (18 feet) long and comprises 489,010 bricks.

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It's the car, right? Ladies dig the car.

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We hope you've enjoyed this sneak peek at Art of the Brick: DC Superheroes.

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