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Here come the new TVs!

The interesting new TVs of 2017 are almost all ones with 4K resolution, and various degrees of support for HDR, or high dynamic range. And if you're shopping for a new TV, it's definitely time to consider one with 4K.

On the other hand, TV prices are at their highest during spring and come down throughout the year, leading into the holiday season. More-affordable models will be announced soon. If you can wait, you should.

But if you have money to burn, the first new TVs of the year are all too happy to help. Here's a peek.

Updated May 1 with new TVs from Vizio and updates throughout.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

LG C7 series OLED TV

Price: $3,000 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: The C7 is the first TV CNET reviewed for 2017, and it's our early favorite for the best high-end set of the year. Until the C7 gets a price drop, however, the 2016 B6 is the OLED TV you should buy right now.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

LG E7 series OLED TV

Price: $4,000 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Unless you have an extra $1,000 and nowhere better to spend it, you should get the C7 instead.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

LG W7 'wallpaper' OLED TV

Price: $8,000 for 65-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: With its amazing form factor that's barely thicker than a coat of paint, the W7 was easily the most talked-about TV at CES. Sure, its ridiculously expensive now, but nonetheless it looks like the future of television.

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Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

LG G7 series OLED TV

Price: $7,000 for 65-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: We'll be honest: unlike the W7, the G7 doesn't excite us. It's a lot more expensive than other 2017 OLED TVs that have identical image quality (according to LG). The main difference is styling, namely the G7's "picture-on-glass design" with a foldable integrated sound bar.

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Photo by: LG

LG B7 series OLED TV

Price: $2,950 for 55-inch

Availability: Now

The outlook: The B7 is basically the Costco version of the C7, and since the price difference is only $50, it's not necessarily the better value.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

LG SJ9500 series

Price: $4,000 for 65-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: LG's non-OLED (aka LCD) TVs were among our least-favorite last year, but the company say it has improved image quality by using a new "nano cell" layer said to boost off-angle performance. They still use the company's IPS panels, however, so I'm doubtful.

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Photo by: Josh Miller

Samsung Q7 series

Price: $2,800 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Speaking of OLED, Samsung is aiming squarely at LG's high-end TV tech with its own quantum-dot-infused technology called "QLED." The cheapest example is the Q7, but it's still really expensive.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Samsung Q8C series

Price: $3,500 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Speaking of expensive, this higher-end series of QLED sets is curved and offers more zones of edge-lit local dimming than the Q7. It's dubious whether those extras will be worth the price difference though.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Samsung Q9 series

Price: $6,000 for 65-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Samsung's most expensive TV for 2017, the Q9 will actually be flat instead of curved and boasts the best specs of the bunch, with the highest light output and the most dimming zones. Too bad they're edge-lit instead of full-array.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Sony A1E series OLED TV

Price: $4,00 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: LG has been the sole brand selling OLED TVs in the US, but Sony is about to change that. The A1E combines an LG Display OLED panel with Sony's processing wizardry and sound that actually emanates from the TV screen itself.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Sony X930E/X940E series

Price: $2,300 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: One of our favorite non-OLED TVs of last year was the X930D, and Sony says the new one is even better. It boasts improved brightness, better processing and (coming later this year) compatibility with the Dolby Vision HDR format.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Sony X900E series

Price: $1,200 for 49-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Sony says this step-down to the X930E will have lower contrast, but since it has full-array local dimming, it could still be an excellent performer for much less money.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Sony X800E/X850E series

Price: $750 for 43-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Sony's least expensive HDR-capable XBR TV for 2017 lacks local dimming and the picture quality pedigree of the better sets, and we didn't love its predecessor.

It still offers the superb Android TV operating system that works with Google Home, however, and later this year it gets the full Google Assistant feature built-in.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

TCL P series

Price: $500 for 50-inch size

Availability: Spring

The outlook: The TCL P series has so many things we love: a low price, full-array local dimming, both HDR formats (Dolby Vision and HDR10) and Roku's Smart TV system. On paper, it seems like a worthy contender against Vizio for the budget TV crown.

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Photo by: TCL

TCL C series

Price: TBD

Availability: Spring

The outlook: TCL is also selling what it calls a more stylish version of the Roku TV. It has everything the P series does but lacks the full-array local dimming, so we don't expect as good a picture. But it could still be a great value.

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Photo by: TCL

Hisense H8D series

Price: $550 for 50-inch size

Availability: Spring

The outlook: The H8 is another intriguing set from a Chinese TV maker with full-array local dimming and HDR at a low price. No, there's no Dolby Vision or Roku smarts, but it does come in 75- and even 86-inch sizes!

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Photo by: Hisense

Visit manufacturer site for details.

Vizio D series

Price: $570 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Since only the 55-inch and 65-inch models in Vizio's entry-level series get local dimming, they're the only ones I expect to substantially outperform entry-level Roku TVs. For other sizes, stepping up the an E (at least) is worth it.

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Photo by: Vizio

Vizio E series

Price: $210 for 32-inch size up to $3,400 for 80-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: Vizio earned our praise last year for the E series' excellent image quality fort the money, and this year it looks to up the value ante even further by adding HDR. There's a wide range of sizes and capabilities available however; no every E is created equal.

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Photo by: Vizio

Vizio M series

Price: $800 for 50-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: The 2016 M series earned my 2016 Editors' Choice Award, with the best picture quality for the money of any TV I tested last year. The 2017 version is even better, according to Vizio. We'll see.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Vizio P series

Price: $1,300 for 55-inch size

Availability: Now

The outlook: For 2017 Vizio didn't do anything to change its best TV, the P series. That's OK with us, since the 2016 version was one of the top LCD TVs of the year.

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