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Article updated on June 6, 2024 at 11:00 AM PDT

Best Filtered Water Bottles of 2024

Stay safely hydrated in the wild with the best filtered water bottles, tested and reviewed by CNET.

Our Experts

Written by 
Caroline Igo
Our expert, award-winning staff selects the products we cover and rigorously researches and tests our top picks. If you buy through our links, we may get a commission. Reviews ethics statement
Amanda Capritto
Caroline Igo Editor, Sleep
Caroline Igo (she/her/hers) is a wellness editor and holds Sleep Science Coach and Stress Management certificates from the Spencer Institute. She received her bachelor's degree in creative writing from Miami University and continues to further her craft in her free time. Before joining CNET, Caroline wrote for past CNN anchor, Daryn Kagan.
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CNET’s expert staff reviews and rates dozens of new products and services each month, building on more than a quarter century of expertise.

Our Picks

$100 at Amazon
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Best overall filtered water bottle
Grayl Geopress Water Purifier
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$21 at Amazon
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Best filtered water bottle for tap water
Brita Premium Filtering Water Bottle
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$30 at Amazon
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Best filtered water bottle for hiking
Astrea One Filtered Water Bottle (Update: Currently Unavailable)
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$30 at Amazon
A hand holding Brita Stainless Steel Filtering Water Bottle in front of a tree.
Best insulated filtered water bottle
Brita Stainless Steel Premium Filtering Water Bottle
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$50 at Amazon
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Lifestraw Go
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$46 at Waterwell
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Waterwell Ultrafiltration Travel Water Bottle
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Adventurers know how important a filtered water bottle is for exploring the outdoors. Fresh and clean water isn't always available when you're on a camping trip or a long hike. Boiling water is an option, but it requires you to carry even more equipment. You wouldn't want to carry around more bottled water either, given recent research has found a higher-than-expected amount of nanoplastics in bottled water.

A filtered water bottle can be a good solution to most of these concerns since it can help remove bacteria and sediment from water quickly. If you're an outdoor adventurer, it will easily be the most crucial piece of adventuring equipment in your backpack.

Many groundwater and tap water sources are perfectly safe to drink from, but drinking from an unfamiliar water source is generally not advisable. A clean-looking water source could be contaminated with viruses, harmful bacteria, protozoa or other microorganisms invisible to the human eye. Even tap water can have contaminants such as lead, chlorine, arsenic, pesticides and even particles from malfunctioning wastewater treatment, despite the Safe Drinking Water Act. Considering all of those factors, it makes sense to try out a filtered water bottle to stay hydrated safely, on the go. The wellness experts at CNET have personally tested the most popular filtered water bottles, comparing them against tap water and fresh water.

What is the best overall filtered water bottle?

The Grayl Geopress Water Purifier is the best overall filtered water bottle because our tests found that it turned natural water into fresh-tasting bottled water. The purification system is the most intense of the bottles tested, as it can filter out chemicals, pesticides, particles, heavy metals, bacteria and viruses. It also requires little to no prep or waiting; just fill and drink. The Grayl Geopress is great for backpacking, hiking or camping when clean water may be scarce.

Best filtered water bottles of 2024

$100 at Amazon

Best overall filtered water bottle

Grayl Geopress Water Purifier

The natural water I tested the bottles in already looked relatively clean, but when I poured a bit from the Geopress water purification bottle, I was shocked at how crystal-clear it looked. Although I guess I shouldn't have been surprised, as Grayl's heavy-duty filtering and water purification system is designed to filter out protozoa, chemicals, particulates (like dirt and sand), heavy metals and bacteria and viruses.

The Geopress water purifier is made of BPA-free polypropylene, a durable type of plastic. The wide base diameter of the water purifier gives it a sturdy feel, and it's designed to withstand 10-foot drops onto concrete while it's full of water. Without a doubt, the Geopress is the best-filtered water bottle to keep you hydrated with pure water on a backpacking trip due to its intense filtering mechanism and durability. 

  • Price: $$$
  • Material: Polypropylene
  • Capacity: 24 oz
  • Filter replacements: $30 for one filter
  • Dishwasher safe?: Outer refill, inner press and cap only 

Pros:

  • Filters out particulates, heavy meals and germs 
  • Relatively easy to clean
  • Wide enough opening to fit ice cubes 

Cons

  • Inner portion and outer portions can suction together if stored when wet
  • Expensive 
$21 at Amazon

Best filtered water bottle for tap water

Brita Premium Filtering Water Bottle

Brita is known for its faucet and pitcher filters, but the company also makes filtered water bottles. According to Brita's website, these bottles aren't intended for outside use -- they're intended for just filtered tap water -- but this bottle also filtered natural freshwater for me just fine. The Brita filtering water bottle uses an activated carbon filter, which is extremely porous and pulls contaminants, such as chlorine and particulates. 

This Brita-filtered water bottle is plastic, BPA-free and relatively sturdy. It consists of just three parts: the bottle itself, the flip-top cap and the active carbon filter, which nicely locks into place on the bottom side of the cap. It's easy to put together and requires almost no prep; just quickly wash the bottle and run the water bottle filter under hot water before your first use. I wouldn't take this filter bottle on a backpacking trip. It would suffice for day hikes if you filled it up with tap water first (use it with natural water at your own risk). 

  • Price: $
  • Material: Plastic
  • Capacity: 26 to 36 oz
  • Filter replacements: 3 for $15 
  • Dishwasher safe?: Yes

Pros:

  • Affordable, sturdy and has locking top 
  • Comes with a handle for travel 
  • Dishwasher-safe 

Cons

  • Best for only tap water 
  • Easy to scratch up 
$30 at Amazon

Best filtered water bottle for hiking

Astrea One Filtered Water Bottle (Update: Currently Unavailable)

The Astrea One filtered water bottle filters out an impressive suite of heavy metals and chemicals, including lead, benzene, mercury, copper, chlorine and more. The website says you shouldn't use this filter bottle with water that is "microbiologically unsafe or of unknown quality," but I tested it in natural freshwater and it turned out fine. Be sure to use as directed. 

The Astrea One water bottle filter inserts snugly into the bottom side of the lid and locks in, giving the bottle an overall sturdy feel. The water I scooped from a natural water hole seemed to magically turn into bottled spring water inside the Astrea filter bottle. If the Astrea One bottle didn't have its filter in place, it would just be a normal wide-mouth stainless steel water bottle, making it super easy to clean: The bottle opening is wide enough to fit a standard dish scrubber inside the lid, and the lid has an extra opening where the filter attaches to make sure you hit all the nooks and crannies. 

  • Price: $
  • Material: Stainless steel
  • Capacity: 18 oz
  • Filter replacements: $13 for one filter
  • Dishwasher safe?: No

Pros:

  • Made of BPA-free plastic 
  • Easy to clean and affordable
  • Water tastes fresh 

Cons

  • New filters should be purchased every three months 
  • Won't keep water cold and only holds 18 oz
$30 at Amazon

Best insulated filtered water bottle

Brita Stainless Steel Premium Filtering Water Bottle

If you want your tap water to stay cold during the day, then you need a water bottle made of heavier, durable material; preferably, steel. Luckily, Brita's Premium Filtering Water Bottle also comes in stainless steel. For about $7 more, this water bottle has all the great features of a plastic water bottle and also keeps your water cold for about 24 hours. While I did notice that the ice in my water bottle may melt, the water did stay cold. 

This bottle is also BPA-safe, double-insulated and very sturdy. It looks just like the plastic Brita bottle but a bit heavier. Both are also the same circumference and should fit into most car cup holders. Do note that while the straw and lid are dishwasher safe, the body needs to be hand-washed.

  • Price: $
  • Material: Stainless steel
  • Capacity: 20 to 32 oz
  • Filter replacements: 3 for $15
  • Dishwasher safe?: Top only

Pros:

  • Stays cold for about 24 hours 
  • BPA-free 
  • Filter replacements are affordable 

Cons

  • The body is not dishwasher-safe
  • Compared to the plastic Brita bottle, this holds slightly less water

Other filtered water bottles tested

$50 at Amazon

Lifestraw Go

Despite being one of the most popular water-filtering products on the market, the Lifestraw Go did not meet my expectations for filtering. The double-stage filtration includes a hollow-fiber membrane and a carbon capsule, yet this is the only bottle that produced water with particles after passing through the Lifestraw filter. That's not to say the Lifestraw Go isn't safe to drink from -- the particles were probably just sediment -- but it did produce a relatively strong mineral taste compared to the other bottles on this list.

The Lifestraw Go is made of BPA-free plastic throughout and has three simple parts (bottle, cap and filter; four parts if you count the carbon capsule inside the filter). Overall, the Lifestraw Go feels pretty sturdy. I prefer the durability of stainless steel, but it's lightweight and comes with a carabiner, so it would make a good backpacking water bottle. Any time you use the bottle, let the water sit for a few moments to prime the hollow-fiber membrane filter.

$46 at Waterwell

Waterwell Ultrafiltration Travel Water Bottle

Waterwell claims its double-stage filtration system removes 99.9% of waterborne pathogens, but based on the taste of the water that came from this bottle, I wouldn't be so sure. I didn't feel or see any particles like I did with the Lifestraw Go, but the taste alone was enough to make me wary of bringing this bottle into the backcountry for clean water.

The bottle and cap are made from BPA-free plastic and feel just as sturdy as a plastic bottle should. The filter is attached to the straw by a flimsy rubber tube, which could be the culprit behind the poor filtering. The water tasted sour, but I couldn't quite place the taste (sulfur, maybe). Despite its poor filter attachment and sour taste, the Waterwell is easy to use, with the same setup as most of the other bottles on the list: bottle, cap, filter. The water bottle filter detaches easily and the bottle opening is large enough to insert a standard dish scrubber.

How we tested filtered water bottles

Six filtered water bottles lined up outdoors.

I put six filtered water bottles to the test at a water source of fresh groundwater in Southern California.

Paige Thies/CNET

For the sake of safe drinkable water, two friends and I ventured out to a freshwater source in Southern California. We were lucky to find a tiny trickle of a waterfall in the Rancho Sierra Vista/Satwiwa Wilderness area in the Santa Monica Mountains, which culminated in a series of four tiny pools of water. Of the four water holes, we settled on testing the bottles in the one that looked the least stagnant (and had the fewest bugs and tadpoles).

The day before the hike, I cleaned and prepped each water filtration bottle on my list according to their instructions. I filled each bottle from the same water hole and tasted the water from each bottle on site. I then drank from the bottles one by one and poured some water from each to see how clean it looked. I was ready to drink gallons of water if need be and keep drinking until I determined the best reusable water bottle.

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Factors to consider when choosing a filtered water bottle

I considered five important criteria when using each reusable water bottle: filtering and filter capacity, materials, taste, ease of use and cleanup. These are all factors you should consider when looking for a water purifier bottle. You'll want to purchase one that suits the activity you plan to use it for.

For instance, if I was looking for a filtered bottle to take backpacking, I wouldn't choose the Brita. I also wouldn't invest in the Grayl Geopress if I only needed a bottle for tap water.

Filtering

Look for a filtering mechanism that filters out harmful contaminants, bacteria and viruses, and other unpleasantries out of the presumably non-potable water. Does the water bottle filter leave any particles in the water after filtering? Also, consider how much replacement filters are and how easy it is to replace them.

Materials

Most filtered water bottles are made of plastic or stainless steel. If the bottle you are looking at is made of plastic, make sure it is BPA-free. Also, make sure it is durable. Would a few drops dent the water bottle? If you are a hiker and need a lightweight bottle, is the material too heavy?

Taste

It's pretty obvious, but you want a filtered water bottle that leaves you with fresh-tasting water. Specifically, you don't want any remnants of mineral odor or chemical tastes such as a chlorine taste.

Ease of use

Putting the bottle together should be easy. Inserting and replacing the filter should be simple. Also, consider how the water flows from the straw to your mouth. Do you have to tilt it a certain way to get most of the water out?

Cleanup

You want a filtered water bottle that is easy to clean. Check to see if the bottle is dishwasher-safe. After use, what are you supposed to do with the bottle? Can you easily store it?

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Best filtered water bottles FAQs

Which water bottle is the healthiest?

Stainless steel or glass water bottles are the healthiest because they are natural and chemical-free. Some plastic water bottles can expose you to chemicals when the material is under the hot sun for too long. If you opt for a plastic water bottle, look for one that is BPA-free. 

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Are filtered water bottles good for you?

Yes, filtered water bottles are good for you, because they can remove harmful contaminants from your drinking water. While your tap water may already be clean, filters can help remove bad taste from your water. Additionally, these water bottles are great for hiking when you need to purify natural water. 

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What are the disadvantages of a stainless steel water bottle?

The disadvantages of a stainless steel water bottle include the bottles being a little heavier than plastic, often they are not dishwasher safe, may cost more and they may dent easily when dropped. 

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