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Article updated on May 14, 2024 at 3:00 PM PDT

Best Peloton Alternatives for 2024

Peloton bikes are great, but they're not for everyone nor every budget. Here are the best Peloton alternatives for you to consider.

Our Experts

Written by 
Russell Holly,
Jared DiPane
Our expert, award-winning staff selects the products we cover and rigorously researches and tests our top picks. If you buy through our links, we may get a commission. Reviews ethics statement
Russell Holly
Russell Holly is a Managing Editor on the Commerce team at CNET. He works with all of CNET to assemble top recommendations as well as helping everyone find the best way to buy anything at the best price. When not writing for CNET you can find him riding a bike, running around in Jedi robes, or contributing to WOSU public radio's Tech Tuesday segment.
Expertise 7 years experience as a smartphone reviewer and analyst, 5 years experience as a competitive cyclist Credentials
  • Author of Taking your Android Tablets to the Max
Jared DiPane Writer
Jared DiPane is a writer on CNET's Commerce Team specializing in finding the best deals and tips on how to maximize your money. With over 10 years of experience, he's managed commerce content and initiatives for Digital Trends, Mobile Nations, & Future PLC. When not deal hunting, he's likely spending time with his family, building something or researching his next big purchase.
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Like so many other things at CNET, we test exercise bikes as thoroughly as possibly through rigorous examination and comparison. Each exercise bike in our list has been through at least 100 miles of riding, using as many of the built-in features as possible.

Our Picks

$1,000 at Best Buy
BowFlex VeloCore bike
Best overall Peloton alternative
Bowflex VeloCore
View details
$776 at Amazon
echelon-connect-ex3
Best budget Peloton alternative
Echelon Smart Connect Bike EX3
View details
View details
$999 at Bowflex
bowflex-c6-with-tablet
Best Peloton alternative with no subscription
Bowflex C6 (Update: temporarily unavailable)
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$1,399 at Myxfitness
myx-fitness-bike
Best Peloton alternative for full-body workouts
Myx II Plus
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$2,495 at Peloton
bike-plus-swivel
Best if money is no object
Peloton Bike Plus
View details
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$1,495 at Stryde
Stryde Bike
Great for DIY cyclists
Stryde
View details
View details

Top-tier indoor exercise bikes have been around for a long time but Peloton bikes dominated the industry almost overnight thanks to some fantastic marketing. The Peloton hype is largely justified, as long as you're a fan of spin class-style workouts and you want to join a live class from your home. But as nice as they are, Peloton bikes are expensive, even before you count in the mandatory monthly subscription to access those classes. It's just so much money, especially if you’re just starting your fitness journey and uncertain about diving into the Peloton community. Fortunately, there are some exceptional Peloton alternatives out there. If you’re looking for your own bike, we’ve tested quite a few stationary bike options to help you find the best Peloton bike alternative to fit your needs and budget.

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Which is the best Peloton alternative?

I've been testing indoor bikes for more than five years now, and while I don't think there's a single bike that's perfect for all people I would say the best overall Peloton alternative is the Bowflex Velocore series. If you're looking for a large display with a lot of options on the screen that Peloton is never going to offer, you'll be happy with this bike. If having a giant screen doesn't matter as much to you, there's a budget-friendly version with a 16-inch display instead.  

Editor’s note, May 2: Bowflex filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy on March 5. Its assets have been sold to Johnson Health Tech, which owns various fitness and wellness brands. New orders are temporarily paused on Bowflex products, but you can still purchase them directly through retail partners while supplies last.

Best Peloton alternatives of 2024

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Showing 11 of 11 Results
$1,000 at Best Buy

Best overall Peloton alternative

Bowflex VeloCore

Bowflex is known for its home workout machines, but its Velocore series is genuinely something anyone can enjoy. The bike is surprisingly modular, and its magnetic resistance system allows you to get a whole-body workout without making a ton of noise. The big front wheels make it easy to move around and you can use the big speakers on the front of the display, though Bluetooth is also an option. The truly unique part of this design is the way it allows you to lean into your rides thanks to a locked hinge, which offers a core workout while you ride.

What makes this exercise bike stand out is everything you get on the screen. The Bowflex JRNY service does require a subscription to use, but at $20/month it's less than half the cost of Peloton's service and offers a ton of things you can't get elsewhere. If you want a growing set of classes to give you a clear set of instructions for working out, Bowflex has quite a bit to offer through its subscription service. If that's not your thing, there are loads of other options including just watching Netflix or Hulu or even Max while you ride. It's something few other bikes do unless you bring your own screen, and Bowflex does it with ease. 

$776 at Amazon

Best budget Peloton alternative

Echelon Smart Connect Bike EX3

A lot of indoor bike manufacturers try to compete with Peloton on price without sacrificing a ton in quality, but Echelon does it better than most. If you're new to cycling without knowing whether this is something you want to massively invest in, a budget option that's fun to use makes a big difference. The frame on the Echelon EX-3 is sturdy, offers a rear flywheel with magnetic resistance, and it's got a great tablet and phone mount you can position however you want. It's also got rear-mounted water bottle holders, which isn't common with indoor bikes but nice if you want to feel like you're simulating an outdoor ride on a performance bike. 

Echelon's bikes are not a 100% copy of the Peloton experience. If you've used a Peloton before, you'll notice this bike is a little louder and the magnetic resistance is a little sudden and intense by comparison. What you do get is a Bluetooth connection so you can use just about any app to tell you how well your workout went, and at a price that even if you add in the optional subscription from Echelon is dramatically less than what you'll find anywhere else. 

$999 at Bowflex

Best Peloton alternative with no subscription

Bowflex C6 (Update: temporarily unavailable)

Maybe you don't want to stare at a screen while some spectacularly fit 22-year-old instructor yells at you to pick up the pace. While many bikes with screens offer a small amount of other distractions -- like recordings of a bike on a trail somewhere exotic or a selection of streaming apps to watch a movie -- there's something to be said for the flexibility of bringing your own screen. If you're looking for a bike that's well made and supports multiple body types without forcing you into a single experience for working out, the Bowflex C6 is what you want. 

The device mount on the handlebars of the Bowflex C6 makes it easy to bring your own screen and mount it however you see fit, but the Bluetooth data sharing also makes it possible to set your bike in front of a TV and enjoy an even larger set of distractions. Most cycling apps will pair with the Bowflex C6 easily, but it's worth pointing out that some performance-based apps like Zwift don't always get the most accurate information from this bike. 

$1,399 at Myxfitness

Best Peloton alternative for full-body workouts

Myx II Plus

Myx bikes have always been aimed at hardcore fitness fans, but when Myx merged with the folks at BeachBody, an already great experience expanded to way more people with the Myx II Plus. This is a great bike for a variety of body types, and it allows you to adjust your screen in just about every direction. Unlike many of its competitors, Myx II Plus makes it easy to share the bike with up to five other people without needing multiple subscriptions.

Where most exercise bikes offer the ability to do a variety of workouts while on the bike, Myx II Plus offers a ton of things to do off the bike as well. The included software offers everything from yoga to kettlebell classes with everything in between in addition to an array of spin class-style workouts and even live classes you can join throughout the week. It's one of the few exercise bikes in this price range that can truly deliver a full-body workout. 

$2,495 at Peloton

Best if money is no object

Peloton Bike Plus

Peloton's cycle is, without question, the Bentley of home exercise bikes -- a sturdy and beautiful machine that feels every inch like a premium product. It has a price tag to match the Peloton experience: $2,490, plus $44 a month for on-demand and live classes. If you've got the money, the Peloton Bike Plus really is a great bike.

Although I didn't love having to buy (and use) special clip-in cycle shoes, I did enjoy the overall Peloton experience. The high-energy cycling classes are fun and engaging, with a huge variety of instructors, music genres and difficulty levels -- something for everyone.

$1,495 at Stryde

Great for DIY cyclists

Stryde

One thing almost every bike with a screen on it has in common is the manufacturer makes the rules. You have a nice, large screen in front of you but can only access what they want you to see and experience if you pay for the access. Some offer additional apps you can install, but the list is extremely limited and typically only includes streaming TV shows or movies. Stryde makes it clear on its site the tablet on the front of its bike is a fully unlocked device running Android, so the only limit is your desire to tinker with your bike. 

When you're not trying to install Zwift or TrainerRoad on your tablet, the bike itself looks really nice and offers a comparable level of magnetic resistance to simulate any kind of cycling. You don't have to pay for the subscription service if you don't think the included classes are particularly valuable, but if you're looking for a Peloton-like training regiment you'll find a lot to like there. 

Comparing Peloton Alternatives

Max WeightCostDimensionsScreen SizeWorkout Types
Bowflex VeloCore 325lbs$1,80059.8" L x 24.1" W x 55.3" H16" or 22"Full Body
Echelon EX3 300lbs$430.0059″ L x 23″ W x 53″ HTablet holder onlyCycling Only
Bowflex C6 330lbs$999.0054.6" L x 30.7" W x 51.8" HTablet holder, performance-only LCDCycling Only
Myx II Plus 350lbs$1,399.0054" L x 21" W x 47" H21.5"Full Body
Peloton Bike Plus 297lbs$2,495.0059" L x 22" W x 59" H23.8"Full Body
Stryde 350lbs$1,495.0049.6" L x 24" W x 46" H21.5"Cycling Only

How we test Peloton alternatives

Every indoor bike has the same basic feature set, but testing any bike as a viable Peloton alternative means the bike needs to meet a few basic benchmarks. When testing any indoor bike, we're primarily interested in measuring the following:

  • Size, stability and comfort: How well this bike fits in your home and how comfortable it is to ride in a home. This includes ease of assembly, how much noise the bike makes and how well it tucks away when not in use if that's what you need in your space.
  • Software features: If this is a Peloton alternative, it needs to be able to deliver a lot of different things all at once. This includes heart-rate monitoring and reporting, access to a wide variety of workout types and the ability to use your bike in a competitive workout environment (real or virtual)
  • Cycling flexibility: It's important that the indoor bikes we consider as Peloton alternatives be able to challenge a wide variety of skill levels. This means something on this list allows for clearly defined difficulty levels and allows for someone with preferred cycling shoes to comfortably use the bike.

Each bike we have access to is thoroughly tested by riding in three different situations -- included HIIT workouts, 20-mile performance rides and more casual 30-minute cycling sessions. If we have not yet had access to the bike but find its features interesting, this detail is called out in the section.

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Factors to consider when choosing a Peloton alternative

There's no such thing as one bike for every kind of rider out there, and while Peloton makes a great bike there may be better options out there depending on your needs. With that in mind, we test all of our indoor bikes using the same criteria.

Price

Consider how much you're willing to spend on an indoor bike. A big part of our testing is identifying which areas of an ideal cycling experience can be reduced to save money without impacting the quality of your workout. 

Subscription quality

Many smart bikes now include a subscription to access their classes. Decide if a member subscription is important to your indoor cycling experience or if you want an option to just ride. For example, some subscription services offer less expensive options to add family members.

Physical space

A lot of indoor bikes take up a lot of room, and a big part of making sure your purchase doesn't quickly become a very expensive clothesline is making sure it's the right size for your space without sacrificing the things that make a good workout.

Workout quality

At the end of the day whatever bike you choose needs to be enjoyable to use. This means testing the seat for extended periods, as well as the different riding positions you'd want to be in while riding. 

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How we test Peloton alternatives

Like so many other things at CNET, we test exercise bikes as thoroughly as possibly through rigorous examination and comparison. Each exercise bike in our list has been through at least 100 miles of riding, using as many of the built-in features as possible. Every exercise bike is judged against the following metrics:

Exercise bike volume

Every workout makes some noise, but a quieter bike typically means greater build quality. At the same time, if an exercise bike has a built-in display with speakers it's important to know it's possible to clearly hear the class instructor or your favorite TV show over the sound of you working out.

Riding position flexibility

It's important to be able to set your exercise bike to the riding position that works best for you and be able to ride in that position for extended periods. All of the bikes in this list are tested in cruiser, neutral and competition riding positions to ensure comfort for as many body types as possible. 

Software compatibility

Even if your bike doesn't have a display, it likely has a way to connect to your phone or tablet to access performance apps. That testing doesn't end at the ability to connect to a phone, the accuracy of the information sent from the bike to your phone makes a big difference, especially if you're counting calories or you want to use a competitive racing app to ride with friends. Making sure the power you push into your exercise bike is accurately reflected in the information sent to apps makes a big difference. 

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Peloton alternatives FAQ

Which bike is Peloton's biggest competitor?

This is a tough question to answer because it depends on what kind of cyclist you are. If you're new to cycling and want the gym experience at home, the biggest competition to Peloton would be the Myx II Pro referenced above. If you're a more advanced cyclist looking for a way to get in a variety of workouts at home without needing to go to a scheduled spin class, the competition to Peloton would likely look more like an indoor trainer where you're using your own road bike hooked up to a Wahoo Kickr Smart Trainer.

Because indoor bikes like Peloton reach such a broad audience of cyclists, your level of enthusiasm has a ton of weight on your choice. 

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What should I look for when buying an indoor exercise bike?

Before you decide which indoor exercise to buy, you'll want to consider several things including cost, size, display screen and whether or not you'll need a monthly subscription. If your main goal is to simulate the experience of riding outdoors, for instance, you'll want a bike like the Bowflex VeloCore, which offers a realistic road feel and can mimic the way you lean into turns. If your main goal is to get the most bang for your buck, you'll want to consider something like the Bowflex C6

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Which muscles does indoor cycling work?

Indoor cycling is a full-body workout. It targets your core, upper body, back, glutes, quadriceps, hamstrings and lower legs. Some bikes also include weights so you can more specifically target muscle groups in your arms. 

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Is a built-in or BYO screen better?

The most eye-catching aspect of the Peloton exercise bike is, without question, its big HD touchscreen. That's also a big reason the bike is so expensive; many indoor spin bike competitors come with a smaller screen or none at all. The Bowflex C6, for example, doesn't come with any kind of display. Instead, it has a mount for your tablet. The smaller screen may not draw you in as much, but a tablet lets you do things other than watch indoor cycling class videos like read books, stream Netflix or even go on virtual outdoor scenic rides. I'm not saying one is definitively better than another -- there are pros and cons to built-in and BYO screens.

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Is a subscription necessary?

If your goal when buying a piece of home-fitness equipment is to avoid pricey gym or class memberships, some of these bikes may leave you scratching your head. As noted, Peloton charges $44 a month; Myx Fitness runs a little cheaper at $39, while Echelon's plans range from $30 to $35. If you buy a NordicTrack cycle, you get your first year of the iFit service free and after that, it costs $39 a month. 

You can use any of these bikes independently, though; you don't have to take a class (but Peloton does require a minimum one-year subscription as part of your purchase). If you decide not to pay for a membership and fitness app, some bikes will no longer collect or display data, such as speed and distance, about your rides, which is one of the reasons someone might choose an indoor bike over a road bike. 

Much as you might dislike the idea of yet another monthly subscription, even $40 is less than what you'd typically pay for just two or three drop-in cardio workout classes at your favorite indoor cycle studio (and it's worth it if you find a particular Peloton instructor particularly motivating). Just be sure to factor that cost into the overall expenditure and, where possible, look for discounts on the prepaid, annual subscriptions.

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