You can set the V700's driver to automatically scan when launched. In this mode, you can select only two settings: the output resolution and whether or not to perform color restoration.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
Most users will probably choose to operate in Home mode, which lets you select from a wider selection of document types, more automatic correction options, and basic exposure controls.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
Epson's driver has a couple of interfaces for batch-scanning slides. In both cases, you can change individual settings--except for resolution--for each frame, then scan whichever slides you choose as a batch. I like this interface, because you don't have to define scan regions for each frame: you simply check the boxes for each one you'd like to include in the batch.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
In Professional mode, you have the broadest selection of options, including levels editing and curve adjustment. I find the interface a bit clunky and obscure for adjusting many of the settings, but they get the job done.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
The integrated Digital ICE dust and scratches removal tool works better on some types of flaws than others. For instance, it cleanly wiped up dust on the slide (see the lower left-hand corner of the original, left, and the cleaned-up version on the right). However, it didn't touch the severe scratch (inset). This is one case in which the Digital ICE that's integrated into slide scanners would likely have done a better job, because of some extra operations that version is able to run.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
In Pro mode, you can opt for automatic exposure adjustment, levels, tone curve, color balance brightness, and contrast saturation, as well as selectively bias the midtone hues.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
If you need to scan 3D objects, say, for scrapbooks or product promotion, I think the V700 works quite nicely. This headband is as thick as two stacked nickels, and the scanner still managed to sharply render the curved sides.
Photo by: Lori Grunin
No program can fully automate the process of restoring old photographs, and photos that have already gone sepia are especially difficult. The V700 does a decent job of replicating the original (left), as well as automatically removing the sepia cast (right).
Photo by: Lori Grunin
Although the automatic scanning worked reasonably well (left), I used the tools within the Epson driver to make the photo more neutral and to enhance the detail (right). The washed-out spot on his face would require more labor-intensive retouching in Photoshop or other image-editing software.
Photo by: Lori Grunin

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