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The Gen 2 Singlecue turns your hand into a universal remote, by controlling your smart home devices with gestures.

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The device tracks your gestures with a camera, and communicates with you by displaying its menu system on the 1.5-inch-by-2.5-inch screen.

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People can cycle through their devices, select one, then access a set of controls for that particular device. All of this is controlled via swiping and clicking motions.

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One issue with Singlecue is the fact that the camera only tracks your gestures if you're sitting directly in front of it. That means multiple users will have a hard time controlling the TV -- or even the same user if they sit in different spots on the couch.

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The only two direct-control gestures are these: you can hold up an open hand, then make a fist, to pause or play video. And you can put your finger to your lips to mute the TV.

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The menus are easy enough to navigate, but the more devices you add, the more convoluted they become. Disappointingly, you can't customize command sets in the menus or gestures to issue those commands.

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Despite the impracticality of the Singlecue, it feels pretty cool to control your TV and smart home devices with simple gestures.

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For $150, the Gen 2 Singlecue can be yours. Whether the coolness outweighs the inefficiency is up to you.

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