CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Already In The Yellow

Three-time Tour de France winner and leader of the U.S. Postal Service cycling team, Lance Armstrong, puts on the yellow jersey after winning the prologue of the Tour de France cycling race, a 7-kilometer (4.35 miles) individual time trial in Luxembourg, Saturday July 6, 2002.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
1
of 14

Wanna Trade?

Tour de France cyclists pass a man on horseback near Saarbruecken, Germany, during the second stage of the Tour de France. Overall leader Rubens Bertogliati of Switzerland, in yellow jersey, strains along with teammates of the Italian Lampre cycling team.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
2
of 14

Team Time-Trial

ONCE team riders Igor Gonzalez Galdeano, Abraham Olano, Jose Azevedo and Joseba Beloki on their way to winning the 67.5km team time-trial stage of the 89th Tour de France. If an individual rider hopes to ulitmately win the Tour, it is essential that his team performs well in this dangerous and gruelling stage.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:REUTERS
3
of 14

Godspeed!

French nun Marie-Josette applauds to riders as they speed through the village of Noyal-Pontivy, Brittany. U.S. Postal service rider Benoit Joachim of Luxembourg is seen on the far left.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
4
of 14

Flying Dutch

Karsten Kroon of the Netherlands, left, rides ahead of Rabobank teammate and fellow countryman Erik Dekker, during a seven-men breakaway in the 8th stage between Saint-Martin-de-Landelles, Normandy, and Plouay, Brittany. Kroon won the stage and Dekker finished third.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
5
of 14

Racing Resumes

Spectators on stilts cheer a group of riders during the 147km tenth stage of the Tour from Bazas to Pau, France. The race had resumed after one day of rest.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
6
of 14

Vive la France!

"Jean Delatour" team rider Patrice Halgand celebrates as he becomes the first Frenchman to win a stage in the 89th Tour de France. "ONCE" team rider Igor Gonzalez Galdeano of Spain retains the race leader's yellow jersey.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
7
of 14

First Win For Britain

David Millar of Britain reacts as he wins the race between Lavelanet and Beziers, southwestern France, on Saturday, July 20, ahead of David Extebarria of Spain, Michael Boogerd of the Netherlands, and Laurent Brochard of France.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
8
of 14

Tour de Histoire

Pavel Padrnos of Czech Republic, his teammate and the overall Tour leader Lance Armstrong, and Joseba Beloki of Spain ride past the ancient city-fortress of Carcassonne during the 13th stage of the Tour de France between Lavelanet and Beziers.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
9
of 14

The Giant of Provence

Lance Armstrong spins to the finish line of the 14th stage between Lodeve and Le Mont Ventoux, which featured the most difficult mountain climb of the 89th Tour de France. Richard Virenque, of France, won the stage and Armstrong finished in third place, increasing his overall lead to 4 minutes and 21 seconds.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
10
of 14

School's In Session

The best young rider of the last year's Tour de France, Oscar Sevilla of Spain (r), talks with this year's white jersey holder, Italian Ivan Basso, in Vaison-La-Romaine prior to the start of the 15th stage. The first stage held in the French Alps was eventually won by the Colombian rider Santiago Botero.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
11
of 14

Didi The Devil

Dressed as the devil, cycling fan Didi Senft from Kolpin, Germany, chases Dutch Rabobank team rider Michael Boogerd as he climbs on to win the 179.5km sixteenth stage from Les Deux Alpes to La Plagne. Besides chasing Tour de France riders for 10 years Didi is famous for building and riding the world's biggest (12-foot high) bicycle.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:Reuters
12
of 14

The "True" Best Climber

Riders pass by a cow wearing the best climber polka dot jersey during the 176.5km 18th stage of the 89th Tour de France from Cluses to Bourg-en-Bresse in Eastern France. Credit Agricole team rider Thor Hushovd became the second Norwegian ever to win a stage of the world's most prestigious cycling race.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:Reuters
13
of 14

Leaving No Doubts

Lance Armstrong crushed his opponents once again in winning the 19th stage of the 89th Tour de France, a 50 kilometer (31 miles) individual time trial between Regnie-Durette, central France, and Macon, Burgundy.

Updated:Caption:CBS News StaffPhoto:AP
14
of 14
Up Next

Check out the amazing flying skills of the Airbus A350-1000