HTC Evo Design 4G

Here's our weekly roundup of the new products CNET reviewers liked best.

HTC Evo Design 4G


Editors' rating: 4 out of 5


The good: The HTC Evo Design 4G has an understated black-on-black design, Android 2.3 Gingerbread, two cameras, and is a world phone. It comes with 8GB of memory preinstalled.


The bad: The stubborn back cover is hard to remove and the speakerphone could be better. A dedicated hardware shutter button wouldn't go amiss.


The bottom line: The HTC Evo Design 4G gives you a lot of smartphone for an excellent value--fast 4G speeds, a good camera, a strong processor, and a sophisticated design. It's an excellent choice for Sprint customers, except those who are specifically looking for a dual-core phone.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $29.99

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

Asus U46E-BAL6

Asus U46E-BAL6


Editors' rating: 4 out of 5


The good: The Asus U46E-BAL6 has an excellent keyboard and a well-designed frame, and comes packed with a fast processor, ample connectivity features--WiMax and USB 3.0 included--and plenty of hard-drive space and RAM for an aggressive price.


The bad: The laptop doesn't have dedicated graphics, and the battery life is good, but we've seen better.


The bottom line: A strong design, tons of features, and plenty of performance make the Asus U46E-BAL6 one of the best 14-inch laptops we've seen all year.


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Starting at: $829.99

Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Samsung SyncMaster S27A850D

Samsung SyncMaster S27A850D


Editors' rating: 4 out of 5


The good: The Samsung SyncMaster S27A850D delivers great overall performance and has a useful assortment of connections, including three USB 3.0 ports. The monitor's stylish but practical design provides many ergonomic options.


The bad: Compared with other professional monitors, the S27A850D lacks a few OSD configuration details. Also, HDMI would have been useful.


The bottom line: The Samsung SyncMaster S27A850D is a well-designed, stylish, professional monitor with great options and performance.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $850.00

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

T-Mobile Sonic 4G Mobile HotSpot

T-Mobile Sonic 4G Mobile HotSpot


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The compact and good-looking T-Mobile Sonic 4G Mobile HotSpot offers mobile Internet access for up to five Wi-Fi clients via T-Mobile's 4G and 3G networks. The device has long battery life, works as a tethered modem, features an SD card slot, and supports text messaging.


The bad: The T-Mobile Sonic 4G Mobile HotSpot data speeds could use some improvement, comparatively. Its included limited data plans are rather expensive, and the router's connection speed is throttled when the monthly data caps are reached.


The bottom line: Well-designed and reliable, the T-Mobile Sonic 4G Mobile HotSpot makes a very good travel companion.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $99.99

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

2011 Dodge Charger

2011 Dodge Charger


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The new infotainment center in the 2011 Dodge Charger uses Garmin software for navigation and gets weather and gas prices from Sirius. Blind-spot detection and adaptive cruise control are available.


The bad: The automatic transmission has only five gears, and there's no Sport mode. Voice command doesn't cover destination entry.


The bottom line: The 2011 Dodge Charger is a competent driver with very useful cabin electronics. But the 2012 model will feature a much-improved transmission.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $25,395.00

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

HP Deskjet 3050A e-All-in-One

HP Deskjet 3050A e-All-in-One


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The HP Deskjet 3050A features a refreshing design and its wireless Web connectivity lets you print in the cloud with HP ePrint technology.


The bad: The printer lacks an Ethernet port for wired networking and its dual ink cartridge bay is a money sink if you print a high volume of photos and color documents.


The bottom line: The HP Deskjet 3050A All-in-One printer marries an attractive design with the latest cloud printing technology in a multifunction device that works for small offices that don't need to print a lot of full-color photos.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $67.00

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

Samsung Stratosphere

Samsung Stratosphere


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The Samsung Stratosphere has Verizon's ultrafast 4G LTE speeds and is the first LTE phone in its arsenal to have a QWERTY keyboard. Plus, it has Wi-Fi Direct, DLNA, and VPN support. Its 5-megapixel camera takes good photos.


The bad: A sibling of the original Galaxy S line, the Stratosphere at times feels a little rehashed. Call quality was also hit or miss.


The bottom line: The Samsung Stratosphere's blazing 4G LTE speeds, QWERTY keyboard, and business tools lend it credence as a handset for corporate minds, but its last-season specs may fail to lure those looking for the ultimate smartphone.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $149.99

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

BlackBerry Curve 9360

BlackBerry Curve 9360


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The RIM BlackBerry Curve 9360 is slim and compact with a tactile physical keyboard. It supports NFC and the BlackBerry 7 OS, and can make calls over Wi-Fi.


The bad: The RIM BlackBerry Curve 9360's side buttons are a little too skinny for us, there's no HD video capture, and it doesn't support T-Mobile's high-speed HSPA+ network.


The bottom line: The RIM BlackBerry Curve 9360 makes a great entry-level offering for those already in the BlackBerry camp.


Read CNET's full review

Please see the manufacturer's site for additional models.

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

Sony MDR-NC200D Digital Noise-Canceling Headphones

Sony MDR-NC200D Digital Noise-Canceling Headphones


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The Sony MDR-NC200Ds are compact noise-canceling headphones with a creative design, deep bass, and adequate noise cancellation. The headphones fold up to fit into a convenient carrying case and can still play music without the noise cancellation engaged.


The bad: Slight, but audible hiss with noise canceling on, and the headphones lack an integrated microphone for making calls.


The bottom line: If you can't afford Bose's QuietComfort noise-canceling headphones, the attractively designed and more affordable Sony MDR-NC200Ds are worth your consideration.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $199.00

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

Sol Republic Tracks Headphones

Sol Republic Tracks Headphones


Editors' rating: 3.5 out of 5


The good: The Sol Republic Tracks headphones are light, fairly comfortable, and sport a durable design with a convenient interchangeable headband, detachable cordage, and an integrated microphone and remote control. They sound good, delivering deep bass, and are affordable at $99.


The bad: The sound isn't terribly detailed, and the on-ear-design can rub certain ears the wrong way.


The bottom line: If you're looking for Monster Beats-style sound at a more affordable price, the Sol Republic Tracks should be on your short list.


Read CNET's full review

Starting at: $99.99

Photo by: Josh Miller/CNET

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