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HolidayBuyer's Guide

Cirrus Vision Jet

Nose

Luggage

Intake

Jetsetter

V-tail

Ruddervators

Now boarding

What, no jetbridge?

Seat with a view

Window seats

Vision cockpit

Taxiing

Off we go

Into the wild blue yonder

Climbing high

Into the Valley

Wings above LA and Ventura counties

Banking

Geoff takes control

Quite a view

Glass cockpit

Touchscreen

Follow the boxes

Secure your own mask first...

A better view

BUR

Mountains and traffic

LA

Nakatomi Plaza

Descent

Traffic

Approach

Stylish landing

Touchdown

CAPS

Above the clouds

Two by two

Double vision

The world's first single-engine private jet, the Cirrius Vision Jet. 

For the full story behind the plane and this tour around it and above Los Angeles, check out Taking flight in the world's first single-jet civil aircraft, the Cirrus Vision Jet.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Inside the nose cone is the radar; behind it, the CAPS, or Cirrus Airframe Parachute System.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The "trunk." Whatever luggage you don't want or need inside can go back here. The smaller hatch is to connect to airport power, so you don't have to run the engine for air conditioning and so on.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The air intake for the single Williams International FJ33-5A turbofan is on top of the fuselage. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The business end of the FJ33-5A, out of which comes approximately 1,800 pounds of thrust.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The distinctive v-tail.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The large ruddervators on top are controlled by the pilot. The small ones on the bottom are controlled by a computer to smooth out the flight.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Excitedly, I headed on board.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The Vision Jet can hold about 2,400 pounds of fuel and cargo (the latter, including you).

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The oversize windows create an airy cabin. USB plugs allow for charging your device, which is helpful, given how many pictures you'll be taking.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

All the seats in the Vision Jet are window or aisle. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The Vision Jet was designed to be flown by a single pilot, who can sit on either side.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Waiting in line to take off from the Santa Monica airport.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Looking north towards Santa Monica, Pacific Palisades and the Santa Monica mountains. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Feet wet. On the left is the famous Santa Monica pier. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The sprawling San Fernando Valley, looking north. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The 38.7-foot wingspan is only slightly wider than the Vision Jet is long. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

We stayed around 7,000 feet for our short flight. The Vision Jet can fly as high as 28,000 feet. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

A gentle bank with a view out of the incredibly expansive windshield. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

"Ladies and gentlemen, this is your captain speaking. Brace yourself; I have no idea what I'm doing."

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Turns out the red button on the side-stick doesn't fire missiles or lasers. Lame.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The "Perspective Touch" glass cockpit is from Garmin, and is highly customizable. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

With just a few taps, the pilot can bring up any info he wants, from navigation to onboard diagnostics.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Set a course and pink boxes appear, just like a video game. I expertly lined us up before the real pilot engaged the autopilot. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Being a pressurized aircraft that can fly at up to 28,000 feet (FL280).

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

After finishing my stint at the stick, I stepped outside to take some photos. LOL.

Caption by / Photo by Cirrus

The Burbank airport. Odd seeing it from this height and angle.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The mountains surrounding the Valley seem a lot smaller from up here.

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Downtown LA, surrounded by miles and miles of metropolis. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The skyscraper nearest the bottom of the photo is Fox Plaza, aka "Nakatomi Plaza."

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The Santa Monica airport is in the distance, putting us somewhere over Century City. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The highly trafficked I-405/I-10 interchange in west LA. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Just over the treetops. With flaps down, stall speed is around 77 mph. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

Yeah, I didn't take this photo. It's a lovely shot, though.

Caption by / Photo by Cirrus

We land, safe and sound, back at Santa Monica airport. I wonder how long it would take to get my pilot's licence, finally. 

Caption by / Photo by Geoffrey Morrison/CNET

The Cirrus Airframe Parachute System in action. Thankfully, we didn't have to use this on our flight.

Caption by / Photo by Cirrus

With the single engine and v-tail, the Vision Jet is certainly distinctive. 

Caption by / Photo by Cirrus

The aircraft I flew in was two-tone red and white, but other colors are available, like black, blue and yellow. 

Caption by / Photo by Cirrus

Two Vision Jets in formation. Anyone want to give me $2 million so I can have one? In the UK it runs £1.57 million and AU$2.56 million in Australia,

For the full story behind the plane and this tour around it and above LA, check out Taking flight in the world's first single-jet civil aircraft, the Cirrus Vision Jet.

Caption by / Photo by Cirrus
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