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A slew of people marched from Washington, DC's Union Station to the Capitol Building on Saturday, October 26, to express their concern with the National Security Agency's mass surveillance programs. This photo shows a banner that refers to what some have called "the chilling effect" of the NSA's mass spying programs -- on journalists, whistle-blowers, and others.

For the detailed article associated with this slideshow, including Edward Snowden's statement read during the Stop Watching Us rally, go here.

Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Fight for the Future (@fightfortheftr)
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"Protection" meaning, perhaps, encryption?
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/EFF (@EFF)
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A reference to the Predator Drone program, which has reportedly involved NSA intelligence.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Emily Crockett (@emilycrockett)
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Chilling effect becomes harshing effect.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Alexis Goldstein (@alexisgoldstein)
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Obama as Big Brother.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Rania Khalek (@RaniaKhalek)
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Republican Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan speaks at the event. Amash is a vocal critic of the NSA's evasiveness before Congress.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Matthew Harwood (@mharwood31)
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Boxes of petitions delivered to the Capitol during the event.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Sina Khanifar (@sinak)
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This clever play on Obama's campaign slogan has been popular at NSA protests around the world.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Rania Khalek (@RaniaKhalek)
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Sunlight through a banner makes an impromptu statement about a need for transparency regarding the NSA's highly secretive activities.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Peter Micek (@lawyerpants)
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Is that text she's sending being "collected"?
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/Keith Ivey (@kcivey)
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DC protestors stand with Snowden to fight surveillance

(Hu)manning the barricades.
Updated:Caption:Photo:Twitter/EFF (@EFF)
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