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Nest upgrades its Protect smart smoke/CO detector (pictures)

To sweeten the pot on the previously recalled Nest Protect, Nest adds features and functions via a Protect 2.0 software update.

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Rich Brown
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1 of 8 Nest Labs

More carbon monoxide data

The Protect will now display how much carbon monoxide it is detecting, and also give you data about the CO levels over time, ostensibly to help you better understand the cause.

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2 of 8 Nest Labs

More carbon monoxide data

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3 of 8 Nest Labs

More carbon monoxide data (3)

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4 of 8 Nest Labs

What To Do 2.0

The new What To Do features aim to give you a better understanding of risks around your home, and help you and your family know how to react in the event of an emergency.

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More What To Do 2.0

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More What To Do 2.0 (2)

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7 of 8 Nest Labs

More What To Do 2.0 (3)

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8 of 8 Nest Labs

More What To Do 2.0 (4)

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