CNET también está disponible en español.

Ir a español

Don't show this again

Jose Antonio, who heads Halo Trust's operations in the region, discusses the next day's agenda. It will be the final day of mine-clearing operations in Cuito Cuanavale, Angola, which has been called the most densely mine-filled town in Africa.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Members of the Halo Trust plan logistics of the last day of operations in the Cuito Cuanavale minefields.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

It's a cold, somber meeting at 5 a.m. on this final day of work as deminers gather before heading to the minefields. Lack of funding is forcing the shutdown of mine-clearing operations here. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

An armored truck waits for duty, parked inside Halo Trust's base in Cuito Cuanavale.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Before entering the minefield, area managers from the Halo Trust review maps showing which areas still need to be cleared.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

The warning is clear, regardless of language. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

This land mine once had a trip wire. It's just as dangerous without one. 

More than 70 types of land mines manufactured in 22 countries have been found in Angola.     

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Disabled by an antitank mine during Angola's civil war, this South African tank rests at the edge of a Cuito Cuanavale minefield.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Red-tipped sticks show a patch of land riddled with live land mines. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Protective gear, including chest pads and face masks, must be worn at all times.

Rows of red-tipped sticks mark the boundary between safety and the uncleared land.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Deminers place white-tipped sticks to show the exact locations of mines they've cleared. A worker walks near a spot were mines had been clustered together to inflict maximum damage.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Technology -- including drones and Google Earth -- may help find land mines, but it still requires the human touch to clear them. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Leaning carefully over the stick at his knees marking the area yet to be cleared, deminers clear all brush from the meter-wide patches they're searching, so they can place their metal detectors as close as possible to the ground.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

This improvised explosive appears to be a rocket, a rifle-mounted grenade and TNT all rigged with a red detonation cord. It's likely connected to another mine or a trip wire.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Angola's 27-year civil war forced many villagers to revert to subsistence farming.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Amandio Manuel lost both legs after stepping on a land mine in 1986, when he was a logistics officer during the war. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

This area in Huambo was a minefield where Princess Diana walked 20 years ago. It now has a school, hotel and rows of houses.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

Students walk to school in a Huambo neighborhood that was once a minefield. This area was cleared by the Halo Trust and returned to the community.

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET

These women pounding corn live in a village that's just a 5 minute walk from the Cuito Cuanavale minefields. 

Caption by / Photo by James Martin/CNET
Up Next
Drones deliver blood to health clin...
24