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Stonehenge is just one of the many world wonders you can spot in the miniature exhibit of Gulliver's Gate, a permanent attraction landing in Times Square. More than 50 nations are represented in a venue the size of a football field.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

With the exhibit being located in Times Square, it's only fitting that guests begin their journey with a miniature version of the tourist hub. But not everything is an exact replica -- artists take creative liberties with space and time in the model world.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Several computer systems bring life to Gulliver's Gate, including interactive models, self-driving cars, trains and even an airport. Keeping track of all the systems is this control center. It's open to encourage guests to talk to the technicians.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

With only a few weeks before the grand opening on May 9, model makers are focused on finsihing the crown jewel of the attraction: a working airport.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Below the models lies a secret world of circuitry and computers that runs the self-driving cars, trains, sound and light systems.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Each model region was created by model makers from that area. The New York model was made in Brooklyn by 16 people, and took nearly a year to create.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The attraction also incorporates a full-body scanner with 128 Cannon DSLR cameras, so visitors can create a 3D printed model of themselves. Take one home as a souvenir or leave one behind to become a "model citizen" of the mini world.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Guests can order a 3D print of themselves in multiple sizes. The cost of joining the exhibit with a tiny you is $44 (or roughly £34 or $AU58). Better hope you're wearing something easy to spot in a crowd.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The model world has scenes representing 50 nations, featuring 1,000 trains, 10,000 cars and 100,000 mini people.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

Self-driving cars zip through the roads of some areas. Wirelessly charged through the road, the cars use infrared sensors to communicate their location, with a computer making sure none get into a crash.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

In every inch, artists find a way to tell a story with interesting scenes -- some more action-packed than others.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

In some cases, models have multiple layers, like this one of Grand Central. Below the main floor is the subway platform.

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Photo by: Sarah Tew/CNET

The detail is impressive, but it's not the only exhibit of its kind. The inspiration behind Gulliver's Gate comes from Germany's Miniatur Wunderland, a similar miniature attraction that sees 1 million visitors a year.

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