/> ED I T O R S C H O I C E IN N O V A T IO N A W A R D
X

Day 2 of Google I/O (pictures)

On day two of its annual developer's conference, Google sheds light on the future Chrome.

Jaymar_Cabebe.jpg
Jaymar Cabebe
VicGundotraKickoff.jpg
1 of 21 James Martin/CNET

SVP Vic Gundotra gets the party started

SVP Vic Gundotra kicks off the day two keynote while sporting a snazzy pair of Google Glass specs.
SundarPichai_Chrome.jpg
2 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Sundar Pichai talks Chrome

SVP of Chrome Sundar Pichai dishes news about Chrome.
Pichai_310million.jpg
3 of 21 James Martin/CNET

310 million users

According to Pichai, after launching only 3.5 years ago, Chrome already has 310 million active users.
Tabsyncing.jpg
4 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Tab-syncing

For those who use Chrome on multiple devices, syncing of open tabs is a godsend.
SyncBrowserHistory.jpg
5 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Sync browser history across devices

What's more, even if you've closed a tab on one of your devices, you can reopen it on another via synced browser history.
ChromeiPhone.jpg
6 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Chrome for iPhone

Starting today, Chrome for iPhone is available in the App Store.
ChromeiPad.jpg
7 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Chrome for iPad

And of course, the iPad gets Chrome too, bringing "silky smooth" tabs, syncing, and a nifty tab overflow solution (left-right swiping) to the megapopular tablet.
ClayBavor.jpg
8 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Clay Bavor takes us through Google Apps

Clay Bavor, Director of Product for Google Apps takes the stage to dish on the cloud-based collaboration platform, as well as on Google's Dropbox-like product Google Drive.
DriveOniOSChrome.jpg
9 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Drive across platforms

Google Drive is now available across the major computing platforms, plus Chrome OS.
OCRtechnology.jpg
10 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Drive's advanced OCR technology on iOS

Bavor demonstrates how a user can pull text out of a registered mail receipt, add it to a database (somewhere in the cloud) and make it searchable, all using Google Drive's OCR technology. He later goes on to show how baked-in Google Goggles technology can do the same with images.
DocsOffline.jpg
11 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Google Docs goes offline

Starting today, Google Docs lets you edit your documents while offline. Changes are saved locally, then synced when you reestablish a connection. Unfortunately, though, this is only available for Documents, and not Spreadsheets or Presentations... yet.
appsfordrive.jpg
12 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Apps for Drive

Taking a peek at some of the apps available thanks to Google Drive SDK 2.0
newChromebooks.jpg
13 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Chromebook

Another look at the newest Chromebook, Google's and Samsung's low-cost, mostly Web-based notebook computer.
ChromebooksBestBuy.jpg
14 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Chromebooks hit Best Buy stores

Chromebooks will soon be hitting Best Buy stores across the U.S., making it a lot easier for the masses to adopt (or completely ignore) the nascent OS.
GoogleComputeEngine.jpg
15 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Urs Holzle introduces Google Compute Engine

SVP of Technical Infrastructure Urs Holzle unveils Google Compute Engine, basically a cloud-based supercomputer that runs in a software compartment.
cores.jpg
16 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Cores for your apps

With Google Compute Engine a developer can access over 770,000 cores worth of computing power to a specific app.
GamepadAPI.jpg
17 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Native Client

Pichai demonstrates how a first-person shooter takes advantage of Native Client, Google's sandboxing technology, which lets programmers bring their C and C++ code to Chrome.
Cirque.jpg
18 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Parallax via HTML5

Joanne Fillion and Aubrey Anderson show off a stunning Cirque du Soleil browser app created completely in HTML 5. With an integrated webcam, a user moving his head side to side, would trigger CSS to move HTML elements around giving him a sense of parallax.
ChromeboxGiveaway.jpg
19 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Chromebox giveaway

If all the Nexus swag wasn't already enough, everyone in attendance is also receiving a Chromebox.
GlassBehindtheScenes.jpg
20 of 21 James Martin/CNET

Glass demo: Behind the scenes

To close out the keynote, Sergey Brin gave attendees a behind-the-scenes look at yesterday's death-defying Google Glass demo. Not only that, he treated them to an encore.
landing.jpg
21 of 21 James Martin/CNET

The eagle has landed (again)

And just as it did yesterday, Glass-powered Google+ hangout in the sky ended with high-fives all around.

More Galleries

The best games on Nintendo Switch

More Galleries

The best games on Nintendo Switch

41 Photos
The best Christmas movies and where to watch them

More Galleries

The best Christmas movies and where to watch them

18 Photos
Spooky space shots show creepy side of the cosmos

More Galleries

Spooky space shots show creepy side of the cosmos

29 Photos
Movies coming in 2021 and 2022 from Netflix, Marvel, HBO and more

More Galleries

Movies coming in 2021 and 2022 from Netflix, Marvel, HBO and more

67 Photos
2021 best new TV shows to watch, stream, obsess about

More Galleries

2021 best new TV shows to watch, stream, obsess about

65 Photos
The 51 best VR games

More Galleries

The 51 best VR games

53 Photos
Best dating apps of 2021

More Galleries

Best dating apps of 2021

13 Photos