A regular Comic-Con attendee, Pirate Pimp Vader is caught here taking a moment to watch the Star Wars clips being shown on the big screen at the Star Wars booth. Or, as he might call them, "home movies."

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Not everybody who wears spandex at Comic-Con is worshiping their favorite superhero. This wrestling fan has gone for style with his Ric Flair costume.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

If some of the most popular sites on the Web were women garbed in Victorian-style underclothes, you'd have Lauren B. as Google; Chloe D. as Reddit; Jenny N. as Twitter; Michele M. as Pinterest; Crystal T. as Facebook; and Isabelle L. as Wikipedia. The women detailed their outfits to evoke the feeling of the sites they depicted as much as possible, explained Chloe, who organized the group. The tiny squares on the front of Pinterest's corset are photos, the birds on top of Twitter's fascinator bounce around ephemerally; and Reddit's hands have Up and Down votes.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Adventure Time and its Ice Queen, depicted here, continues to grow in popularity with both children and adults for its ability to showcase whimsy.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

There's nothing like wearing a wolf-head mask and a T-shirt offering "free hugs" to inspire people to give you a wide berth at the Con.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Even the local bands busking outside the San Diego Convention Center get into (or is that pander to?) the cosplayers with some hastily thrown-together costumes.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

General Prism is the creation of Blake Marnell, a San Diego resident, who said that the character expressed his feelings about the National Security Agency domestic spying scandal. "I had another costume in mind," he said, "but I changed my mind about a month ago." Surely, a coincidental timing with the NSA revelations.

The Google Glass set he's wearing is fake, 3D printed by a friend of his, and he outfitted the costume with numerous spying devices, such as sound-amplifying remote microphones.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Doctor Who has been a big hit at Comic-Con for years. This group of the show's fans has included a cardboard cutout of the Seventh Doctor, played by Sylvester McCoy.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Gender-bending is a time-honored tradition in cosplay. Here we have a female Han Solo, which would make her companion ... Prince Leia.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

The best cosplayers at San Diego are the ones who make their own costumes, such as these characterizations of the Spider-Man villains Hobgoblin and Green Goblin.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Costuming brings together strangers who otherwise would never meet, including this child Hulk and an adult Captain America who happened to be walking near each other.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

The last Iron Man movie showcased several dozen Iron Man armors, but we don't recall seeing this Mrs. Iron Man ... er, Iron Woman, version before. It's probably the only effective way to turn Tony Stark into an honest man.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

A very dapper Riddler.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Travis Carter, a Palm Springs member of the popular Star Wars cosplay group, "The 501st Legion," takes a break from the action.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

What would happen if musicians were superheroes? These two fans have mashed up the iconic mouse head of Deadmau5 with Spider-Man and Deadpool.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

He may look like he's in costume, but he's actually just hawking utilikilts on the Con floor.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

Otto the Octopus and his handler, Victoria, have steampunk adventures on the Con floor. Although Victoria and Otto aren't exactly household names, Kate MacIlvanie enjoys cosplaying as the title character because she presents "a strong role model" for women.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

The Con floor this year played host to several highly detailed costumes for promoting special effects, makeup schools, and this: Aliens in L.A., a photo project involving costumed oddities in Los Angeles.

Photo by: Seth Rosenblatt/CNET

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