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Meet Code Jumper. 

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Code Jumper is designed to help children who are blind and visually impaired learn to code. 

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It was developed by Microsoft researcher and computer scientist, Cecily Morrison.

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Now, the American Printing House for the Blind (APH) in Louisville, KY, is taking on the production of Code Jumper. 

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APH president, Craig Meador, looks on as students try out the technology. 

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The kit comes with a hub and pods. The hub has a play and a stop button. 

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Each pod performs one line of code, from saying a word, to playing a melody -- or making a sound. 

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Students string them together to play "Row, Row, Row Your Boat" or a story about ghosts or cowboys. 

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Different pods perform different functions and so do the different dials.

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The brightly colored dials on the pods make it easier for children with low vision to distinguish among them.

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The dials also have different shapes so students can feel the difference between dials and pods. 

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A tablet is also required for Code Jumper, but not included in the kit. 

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Deanna Lefan is a teacher of the blind and visually impaired (TVI) at Breckinridge-Franklin Elementary.

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She sees assistive technology like Code Jumper as a way for students who are blind and visually impaired to learn coding at a young age.

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Her students have only used Code Jumper a couple of times so far.

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They're hoping to incorporate it into their school curriculum more regularly. 

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