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America's top Android devices (pictures)

A look at which Android devices are still most active in the United States might surprise. There's some fresh faces, but some vintage (ok, at least as far back as 2010) names with staying power, too.

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Eric Mack

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1 of 10 Eric Franklin/CNET

10. Google Nexus 7

The Nexus 7, which is the 2nd most popular Android tablet, is the 10th most popular Android device in the nation, according to data collected in February 2013 by Handset Detection. It makes up 1.5 percent of all devices running Android at its core. The Kindle Fire was the first low-price tablet to make a dent in the iPad's dominance, and then Nexus 7 came along and added some style and grace to Amazon's tablet entry. While the sales haven't quite caught Fire, those of who tote a Nexus 7 still aren't tempted to switch to another Android tab, except maybe a Nexus 10.
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2 of 10 CBS Interactive

9. Motorola Droid X

The Droid X is the Motorola phone that just won't die. Almost 3 years old, it's one of the elder statesmen on this list, perhaps a testament to its durability, if nothing else. It's also one of two Moto Droid phones that folks seem to hang on to -- the other is No. 2 on this list, and still my daily phone.
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3 of 10 CBS Interactive

8. Samsung Galaxy Note 2 LTE

The Galaxy Note 2 is the phone so big and so nice they made it twice. It hasn't been around for that long in comparison to others on this list, but it already makes up 2 percent of all American Android devices. Guess we know what a lot of you got for this past Christmas.
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4 of 10 CBS Interactive

7. HTC Evo 4G

Another oldie but goodie dating back to 2010, the Evo 4G is a favorite among Sprint subscribers, particularly early 4G fans. Lots of those early adopters had to pay a premium price to get ahold of the first 4G smartphone in the U.S. market, so perhaps it's not surprising that they've held on to it this long.
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5 of 10 Josh Long/CNET

6. Generic Androids

For one reason or another, whether it's the product of some modding or something else, a number of Android phones out there don't identify themselves as any particular device. The U.S. has the highest level of Android diversity, with a total of 1,360 unique Android devices, according to statistics gathered by Handset Detection.
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6 of 10 CBS Interactive

5. Samsung Galaxy S 2 (Sprint)

Originally released as the Galaxy S II Epic 4G Touch, Samsung later dropped the fancy stuff and just went with Galaxy S II. This is the phone that set Korea's Samsung on a trajectory leading to where it currently sits now, high atop the heap of Android competitors.
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7 of 10 CBS Interactive

4. Samsung Galaxy S 2 (T-Mobile)

In a tribute to the staying power of what was once the hottest device on T-Mobile, this HSPA+ version of the GS2 was just recently upgraded to Android Jelly Bean. You'll find the offspring of the GS2 higher up on this list, and I'll be truly interested to see where the soon to be released grandchild of this formidable phone lands on this list by summer.
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8 of 10 CBS Interactive

3. Amazon Kindle Fire

It's been a few years since Amazon blew everyone away with the announcement of the Kindle Fire, a smaller, much cheaper iPad competitor. While tech snobs weren't particularly impressed with its specs, it didn't stop millions of Americans from gobbling up the inexpensive slates. Not surprisingly, its flame still burns, remaining the most popular Android-based tablet in the country.
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9 of 10 CBS Interactive

2. Motorola Droid Razr (Verizon)

Motorola has fallen relatively silent since being swallowed by Google, but I still rock this smartphone as a reminder of Moto's former greatness (which is in itself a tribute to its even more former greatness during the flip phone era). The Droid Razr is thin, fast, and a workhorse that was pushed hard beginning in late 2011 by America's biggest wireless carrier. It's not too surprising that it's still popular 18 months later, particularly for those of us still locked into a two-year contract.
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10 of 10 CBS Interactive

1. Samsung Galaxy S III

And here it is, the king of the Android hill... for now. The Galaxy S3 was the first phone to really give the iPhone a run for its money, and by some measures it has outdone the smartphone grand master. Now we all wait for the follow-up and a slew of other new flagship phones to see who will occupy the top spot in coming months.

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