Dragon

On Tuesday, Autodesk Research will present a paper at the SIGGRAPH computer graphics conference that details a tool, known as Pteromys. The tool can optimize almost any user-created paper airplane design and make it flyable. Even a dragon.

Pteromys isn't publicly available and it's uncertain when, or if, it will be. But it's an example of the kind of interactive system, where users are guided by simulations inside tools, that people at the 3D design software company are creating. Autodesk hopes to soon have the tool on display at one of its technology workshops in San Francisco.

Read more: Can an armadillo paper airplane fly? Autodesk says yes

Photo by: Autodesk

Rendering

A computer rendering of a Pteromys-optimized paper airplane.

Photo by: Autodesk

Twin

A paper airplane known as a "Twin," optimized by Pteromys after initial user input and folded after being laser cut on thick paper.

Photo by: Autodesk

Armadillo design

A user-designed armadillo paper airplane, in its early digital state, prior to optimization by Pteromys.

Photo by: Autodesk

Optimized

A look at how Pteromys automatically reflects user edits in its automatic optimization of a paper airplane, in this case an armadillo.

Photo by: Autodesk

Pteromys

A screen shot of the Pteromys tool.

Photo by: Autodesk

Standing

An armadillo paper airplane, standing up on a table.

Photo by: Autodesk

Many planes

A collection of paper airplanes designed using Pteromys.

Photo by: Autodesk

Launcher

A launcher used to launch Pteromys-designed paper airplanes into the air.

Photo by: Autodesk

Bird

A bird-shaped paper airplane.

Read more: Can an armadillo paper airplane fly? Autodesk says yes

Photo by: Autodesk

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