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Warning signs

During my Road Trip visit to Israel, I spent a day in Ramallah, in the West Bank, to learn about the small but growing tech scene there.

An entrance to the territory -- the Qalandia checkpoint, north of Jerusalem -- includes a series of these red signs warning Israelis to stay out.

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Past the Qalandia checkpoint

After going through the checkpoint, the scene is busy, dusty and filled with concrete walls Israel built for security.

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Graffiti walls

Israel constructed a concrete barrier more than a decade ago to prevent terrorism from the West Bank. Palestinians have since drawn graffiti on many parts of the wall.

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In Ramallah

Down the road, I found Ramallah, a modern city filled with towers of glass and limestone.

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PinchPoint's Spermania

Khaled Abu Al Kheir is co-founder and CEO of PinchPoint, a Palestinian mobile gaming company. His firm got a lot of notice last year with the debut of its first title, Spermania, a racing game about a cartoon sperm.

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Hard at work making games

Mousa Hamad, an intern at PinchPoint.

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Developing the next gaming hit

Yasmin Eid, a PinchPoint artist, is busy drawing a cartoon chicken.

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My guide for the day

My guide in Ramallah, Nuha Musleh, serves up lunch at her art gallery on the outskirts of the central district.

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Staying hungry

Faris Zaher, CEO of hotel-booking startup Yamsafer, says his company outlasted many competitors from Jordan and Dubai because "We're hungrier."

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Yamsafer's call center

Inside the company's call center, where Yamsafer employees field travelers' requests and questions.

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Hanging out above Ramallah

Here, a handful of Yamsafer workers take a break while looking out at Ramallah from their company's 11th-floor offices.

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Looking to grow Palestinian tech

The leaders of Mashvisor, a real-estate analytics company founded late last year, want to help build up the Palestinian tech scene.

"It's still a young ecosystem, it's small," CEO Peter Abualzolof said, "but companies like Yamsafer are definitely leading the way."

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At the central market

Ramallah's central market is hectic, filled with people, storefronts and noise.

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A call for protesters

Here, a man on a megaphone calls for people to attend a protest that night.

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Selling drinks on the street

A handful of men wearing bright-red outfits sell sweet drinks to drivers.

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Central market fruit stand

Here's one of a handful of fruit stands lining the sideways in the market.

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