Exotic Cars

You can now purchase this $2M Ferrari-baiting supercar in the US

It might be a while before the SCG003S lands in your driveway, though.

Andrew Hoyle/CNET

If you want to sell a car in the US, you have to spend an inordinate amount of money smashing cars into walls and otherwise guaranteeing its roadworthy status. But there's a way around that, and Jim Glickenhaus was granted approval to take that route.

Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus, the manufacturer started by film producer and director Jim Glickenhaus, announced Tuesday that the company was granted federal approval to produce up to 325 turnkey vehicles annually without having to worry about federal testing. Not only does this mean Glickenhaus can sell its cars here, but it can set up manufacturing efforts and start hiring American workers, too.

I hope you aren't expecting a 51-speaker, ultra-high-fidelity sound system and massagers that fondle individual nerves in your spine. It's not that kind of car.

Andrew Hoyle/CNET

SCG will offer three different variants of its car for sale. The SCG003S -- the second S stands for Stradale, meaning road in Italian -- is the Scuderia's most "tame" offering. Its 4.4-liter, twin-turbocharged V8 will put out more than 750 horsepower and more than 590 pound-feet of torque. With a 0-60 time of less than 2.9 seconds and a top speed north of 217 mph, its $2 million price tag doesn't seem too obscene.

If that's not enough car for you, perhaps the SCG003CS will be. CS stands for "Competizione Stradale," which roughly translates to "road competition." It's still fully road legal, but its specifications will be slightly closer to the full-on SCG003C racecar, which is definitely not road-legal. The Scuderia can also provide race support for SCG003C buyers who want to start a race team.

The first run of 2018 vehicles won't be very large -- between four and six cars will be built. SGC should nearly double those figures in 2019. Beyond that, it's considering opening a second production facility that could expand its volume to 100 cars per year -- which will still be well under the legal limit of 325.

If you want to check out the wild SCG003CS in person, Glickenhaus will bring the first road-registered example to The Quail Motorsports Gathering on August 18, which is part of the Monterey Car Week event in northern California.

The US government enacted the Low Volume Motor Vehicle Manufacturers Act back in 2015. It allows approved automakers to produce only a small number of vehicles each year, but in turn, they would be allowed to bypass federal crash tests and certain other regulations. It's the same law that allows you to buy a brand new DeLorean DMC-12.