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GM Announces Plans for National EV Fast Charging Network

Partnerships with Pilot Company and EVgo will allow for up to 500 new stations across the US.

2022 Chevy Bolt EUV charging
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2022 Chevy Bolt EUV charging

Look for more EVgo stations at travel centers.

Chevrolet

As part of a larger national effort to increase EV charging infrastructure, GM is collaborating with Pilot Company and EVgo to install and operate a network of 2,000 charging stations at up to 500 Pilot and Flying J locations across the country. They will be called Pilot Flying J and Ultium Charge 360 stations.

The initiative will target "highways, connecting urban and rural communities, the East and West Coasts, and different metropolitan areas," GM said in a press release Thursday. The charging stations will be available to all EV brands, but GM owners can access exclusive reservations and discounts on charging. The chargers can offer up to a 350-kW DC fast charge rate, but will match the vehicle's specific charging need.

"GM and Pilot Company designed this program to combine private investments alongside intended government grant and utility programs to help reduce range anxiety and significantly close the gap in long-distance EV charger demand," said Shameek Konar, CEO of Pilot Company.

GM says this is only the first phase of its EV charging station initiative, and that users can expect chargers to be operational in 2023. This project is only part of the company's promised $750 million investment in EV charging infrastructure.

Read moreWhat Biden's Proposed EV Charging Standards Mean for You

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marybeth-monaco-vavrik
MaryBeth Monaco-Vavrik Writer Intern
MaryBeth is a writer intern with the CNET Home team covering a wide array of topics such as appliances, tech, money, wellness and health. She is finishing her undergraduate degree in political science and communication studies at Davidson College in North Carolina, where she works to reduce sexual violence. She believes in the power of information, racial and gender equity, communication and a good sit-com.
MaryBeth Monaco-Vavrik
MaryBeth is a writer intern with the CNET Home team covering a wide array of topics such as appliances, tech, money, wellness and health. She is finishing her undergraduate degree in political science and communication studies at Davidson College in North Carolina, where she works to reduce sexual violence. She believes in the power of information, racial and gender equity, communication and a good sit-com.

Article updated on July 14, 2022 at 8:11 AM PDT

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marybeth-monaco-vavrik
MaryBeth Monaco-Vavrik Writer Intern
MaryBeth is a writer intern with the CNET Home team covering a wide array of topics such as appliances, tech, money, wellness and health. She is finishing her undergraduate degree in political science and communication studies at Davidson College in North Carolina, where she works to reduce sexual violence. She believes in the power of information, racial and gender equity, communication and a good sit-com.
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