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2020 Ford Fusion: Model overview, pricing, tech and specs

The Fusion isn't long for this earth, but it's not gone just yet.

Don't expect many, if any changes between now and the Fusion's near-term demise.

Ford

Domestic automakers have all but culled sedans from their lineup. There are a few remaining holdouts, though, one of which is the Ford Fusion. It's not holding out forever, as production is scheduled to end in 2020, but it will be here long enough to see the 2020 model year.

The second-generation Fusion first appeared in 2013, with a mid-cycle refresh giving the car a nip and a tuck for the 2017 model year. Ford followed that up with a small update for the 2019 model year, so, don't expect any changes to take place for 2020, considering how close to the end the Fusion is.

Read next: Our most recent Ford Fusion review.

Powertrain and specs

If variety is the spice of life, the Ford Fusion is practically running its own Bedouin bazaar. Counting its electrified variants, there are five different powertrains available for the 2020 Fusion. Its base engine is a 2.5-liter I4 that makes 175 horsepower and 175 pound-feet of torque. All Fusions mate their engines to six-speed automatic transmissions, with more powerful engines offering manual gear selection, as well as engine stop-start tech.

The mid-range gas engine, a 1.5-liter turbocharged I4, bumps output up to 181 hp and 185 lb-ft, but if you're really angling for something sprightly, there's a 2.0-liter turbocharged I4 that makes 245 hp and 275 lb-ft, and it's available on multiple trims. Sadly, the 325-horsepower Fusion Sport was discontinued after the 2019 model year, so it does not reappear for 2020. Front-wheel drive is standard, but the 2.0-liter engine can also pick up all-wheel drive.

Fuel economy is all over the map. The base engine achieves an EPA-estimated 21 miles per gallon city and 31 mpg highway. The 1.5-liter brings those numbers up to 23 mpg city and 34 mpg highway. Since the 2.0-liter is a little more fun, its numbers are lower, coming in at 21 mpg city and 31 mpg highway with FWD, dropping further to 20 mpg city and 29 mpg highway with four driven wheels.

And then there's the hybrids. Both the Fusion Hybrid and Fusion Energi plug-in hybrid use a 2.0-liter, Atkinson-cycle four-cylinder gas engine, as well as an electronically controlled continuously variable transmission and mandatory front-wheel drive. The Fusion Hybrid sees a serious bump in fuel economy, ringing in at 43 mpg city and 41 mpg highway. The Fusion Energi is EPA rated at 103 MPGe when relying on both electricity and the gas engine, or 42 mpg combined with the gas engine alone. The Energi's battery is rated for 26 miles of range per charge.

Interior

The Ford Fusion offers seating for up to five passengers. It's a relatively straightforward affair, with a rotary transmission dial on the center console alongside two cupholders and in front of a small storage area. If you're a fan of physical buttons, rejoice, because there are plenty of them for the climate controls and, depending on options, the base radio. The gauge cluster has a single physical dial (the speedometer) flanked by, in its most expensive setup, two smaller screens with adjustable settings.

Behind the second row's 60/40 split-folding rear seats is a 16-cubic-foot trunk. It's good, but it's not great. It comes in ahead of the Chevy Malibu and Toyota Camry, but it lags behind the Honda Accord and Hyundai Sonata.

The interior's a little old school with its manifold physical buttons, but it's still easy enough to get used to.

Ford

Technology

Ford is pretty democratic with the Fusion's infotainment technology. All trims, save for the base Fusion S, receive the same system. It's Ford's latest, Sync 3, running on an 8-inch touchscreen. Not only does it include support for Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, it also includes a Wi-Fi hotspot. Only the top-tier Titanium trim receives embedded navigation, but smartphone mirroring means that shouldn't be a problem. The base Fusion makes do with a diminutive non-touch screen running a bare-bones version of Sync.

One of the most notable updates for the 2019 Fusion has returned for 2020. All trims, including the base Fusion S this time, comes with Ford Co-Pilot360, the automaker's suite of active and passive safety systems. This group includes automatic high beams, blind spot monitoring, lane keep assist, automatic emergency braking and forward collision warning. The SE trim also gets rear parking sensors. Adaptive cruise control and embedded navigation are packaged as an optional upgrade for SE and SEL trims, while it's standard on Titanium models.

Options and pricing

The 2020 Ford Fusion is available in eight separate trims, split between gas and electrified versions. There are S, SE, SEL and Titanium variants of the non-hybrid Fusion, while the Fusion Hybrid is limited to SE, SEL and Titanium trims. The Fusion PHEV is relegated to just the Titanium version.

The base Fusion S starts at $23,170. There's an okay amount of standard stuff in there, including the aforementioned Ford Co-Pilot360, in addition to that small Sync screen, a 4.2-inch configurable display in the gauge cluster, push-button start and an auto-dimming rearview mirror. The $24,500 Fusion SE adds the 1.5-liter gas engine, 17-inch alloy wheels, the Sync 3 infotainment system and rear parking sensors, while the $28,690 SEL adds keyless entry, a power driver's seat and an 11-speaker audio system. At the top of the gas-only pops is the $34,450 Fusion Titanium, which picks up a power moonroof, embedded navigation, front seat ventilation and a 12-speaker Sony audio system.

The Fusion Hybrid's base SE trim starts at $28,000, with the SEL rising to $31,630 and the Titanium landing at $34,595. The most expensive Fusion is the Titanium PHEV, which starts at an even $35,000.

Availability

The 2020 Ford Fusion is now on sale nationwide.