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Frigidaire FPEH3077RF review: This Frigidaire electric stove could leave you fuming

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MSRP: $2,499.00
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The Good The $2,500 Frigidaire FPEH3077RF electric range looks good, bakes evenly and boils water quickly.

The Bad There are too many minor annoyances for an appliance at this price, such as the large amount of smoke the oven produces when it broils hamburgers, some convoluted controls and a questionable power burner.

The Bottom Line Frigidaire FPEH3077RF has a lot of pesky issues for such an expensive stove. Shop around (or wait for a sale) before you settle on this option.

Visit manufacturer site for details.

6.8 Overall
  • Design 7
  • Features 6
  • Usability 7
  • Performance 7

Review Sections

The Frigidaire FPEH3077RF is a $2,500 slide-in electric range.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

I have certain expectations for a stove that costs $2,500. For many folks (me included), that's an expensive investment in your kitchen. Such an appliance should have helpful features and a consistent cooking performance that make it worthwhile to drop that kind of money. 

The $2,500 Frigidaire FPEH3077RF electric range falls short of those expectations. There's nothing extremely bad about this stove, but there's nothing extremely good about it, either. It's a decent appliance that will bake evenly and cook food on its burners at a decent rate. You just have to be willing to deal with some headaches, such as convoluted controls, a high-powered burner that might waste some energy, and a broiler that sears your food well but leaves your kitchen full of smoke.

The FPEH3077RF is another one of Frigidaire's attempts to make a range that echoes commercial-inspired, higher-end products. But if you're brand loyal, stick with the company's lower-cost, freestanding stoves like the Frigidaire Gallery 30-Inch Electric Range. If you want a better-performing product with high-end features, opt for the $2,500 Electrolux EI30EF45QS (owned by the same parent company as Frigidaire) or the $2,600 Kenmore Elite 41313.

The Frigidaire's looks and features are appealing

The electric Frigidaire FPEH3077RF is nearly identical to its gas counterpart, the FPGH3077RF. Both ranges are the standard 30-inch-wide size with a stainless-steel exterior. And the stoves have simple control panels on which you can set two timers, turn on the oven light and check the time. To control the oven, you have to use two separate knobs: one to select the oven cooking mode (Powerplus Preheat, bake, clean, convect bake, convect bake, convect roast, broil, keep warm) and one for the temperature. 

The stove has a setting that will automatically convert a cooking temperature if you're using a convection setting (convection modes cook food faster, so some ovens will automatically lower the temperature to account for quicker cooking). But enabling this setting is convoluted: You have to turn the oven temperature knob to Off, turn the oven mode knob to Convect Bake, press and hold the oven light and clock icons, and then switch the convection converter on or off. 

The Frigidaire FPEH3077RF features a smooth cooktop with four burners and a warming zone in the back center.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

The Frigidaire FPEH3077RF's smooth cooktop has four burners and a warming zone to keep food hot and ready to eat. You can synchronize the two burners on the left of the cooktop to create an oblong cooking surface for cookware like griddles. On the front right of the cooktop is a dual burner for faster boiling (more on that performance later).

Frigidaire includes some nice extras in the FPEH3077RF's 5.1-cubic-foot oven. There are two convection fans built into the oven's back wall that circulate the air while you bake for more even cooking. There is also a place to plug in an included temperature probe so you can keep an eye on the internal temperature of foods roast, such as a turkey. The oven also comes with three racks, including a gliding rack that rolls out similar to a drawer for easy removal of heavy dishes.

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