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HolidayBuyer's Guide
Internet

Combating cyberterrorism

The draft cybersecurity plan, which will be sent to President Bush later this year, outlines a mainly hands-off approach to securing cyberspace, handing primary responsibility to individuals and corporations.

The White House takes the wraps of its cyberspace security plan. The draft plan, which will be sent to President Bush later this year, outlines a mainly hands-off approach to securing cyberspace, handing primary responsibility for security to individuals and corporations.

Critics: Plan lacks muscle
Experts say little has been done to address many of the causes that lead to vulnerabilities that expose Net users to myriad threats.
September 19, 2002

A hands-off approach?
A draft plan outlines the Bush administration's mainly hands-off approach to securing cyberspace.
September 18, 2002

What's behind the words
The cyberspace security plan envisions a broad new role for the federal government in maintaining Internet security.
September 16, 2002

E-terrorism: A myth or true threat?
Predictions of a "digital Pearl Harbor" persist in the year since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. Should we be concerned?
August 26, 2002

previous coverage

Fed plea: Stop security leaks
Security researchers and hackers who find vulnerabilities need to realize that discretion is more important than valor, several federal security experts tell attendees at the Defcon hacking conference.
August 4, 2002

Tech pros see a cyberbomb
Almost half of information technology professionals believe there will be a major Internet attack on U.S. businesses in the next year, an event for which they believe corporations are unprepared, according to a survey.
July 24, 2002

Homeland defense focus shifts
Computer security is becoming an increasingly critical part of President Bush's proposal for a homeland defense department.
July 10, 2002