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2017 Nissan GT-R: Godzilla gets a facelift

Sporting slight tweaks to, well, just about every important piece of the car, Nissan's midcycle refresh brings the GT-R back into the Porsche-fighting fray.

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Tim Stevens
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Tim Stevens

Editor at Large / Cars

Tim Stevens got his start writing professionally while still in school in the mid '90s, and since then has covered topics ranging from business process management to videogame development. Currently he pursues interesting stories and interesting conversations in the technology and automotive spaces.

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2017 Nissan GT-R

Unlike the movie franchise, each new version of Nissan's Godzilla -- the GT-R -- is quite lovely. This one is no exception. While it's not a new generation, it is a strong mid-lifecycle refresh that brings changes to nearly every part of the vehicle. And what better place to debut a new Godzilla than New York?

Both the front and rear bumpers have been tweaked for both a more aggressive look and improved downforce. The new "V-Motion" grille (seen on other new Nissans) helps channel air into the engine, while new side skirts and rear bumper vents keep air moving around the sides. The GT-R's cannon-size quad exhaust tips are still there, but hidden behind them is a new titanium exhaust system.

Interior revisions went toward making it look significantly less busy. The dashboard is now a one-piece, leather-wrapped affair, and the number of physical switches is down from 27 to 11. The infotainment screen, on the other hand, grows to 8 inches from 7. There's also a new controller nestled in the carbon-fiber center console.

2017 Nissan GT-R
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2017 Nissan GT-R
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As for power, there's plenty of it. Thanks to tweaks to both boost pressure and ignition timing, power is up from 545 horsepower to 565. Torque's up, too, from 463 pound-feet to 467. A six-speed, dual-clutch transmission remains the sole cog-swapper.

To prevent you from sending all that newfound power into a guardrail, Nissan's screwed around with both the suspension and the chassis. The company claims the GT-R has improved handling and improved ride quality. We won't be able to determine if that's true or not until later this year, as the car comes out this summer. Either way, we (and many others, we're sure) are counting down the days.

Nissan refreshes the GT-R in the Big Apple (pictures)

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