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Honda Tomo EV concept heads to Geneva with the help of design students

It will hang out alongside the almost-ready EV "prototype" debuting that week.

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"Tomo" means "friend" in Japanese, which seems accurate. It looks so friendly!

Honda, IED

Back in January, we learned that Honda was teaming up with students from the Istituto Europeo di Design (IED) in Italy to create a concept car called Tomo. Now, we have a couple sketches of its design, and it's a stunner.

The Tomo concept is how IED students envision mobility in 2025. Not only is it adorable, it has a purpose -- it's the thesis project for 13 IED students, the final test in their two-year master's program in transportation design. After Honda asked the students to whip something up, they spent months planning and researching, and the result is what you see here.

Some of its front end design -- namely, the round headlights and grille -- looks similar to the Honda Urban EV concept that eventually morphed into the near-production "prototype" EV that will also be shown in Geneva. It's totally different out back, however, where a tiny truck bed takes the place of a traditional trunk or hatch. It's about 13 feet long, 6 feet wide and 5 feet tall -- a little bigger than a Miata, as Autoblog notes. It was designed to be small enough for the city, and I'd say that fits the bill.

Of course, it's just a design exercise for now, so don't expect it to reach production. But given the fact that Honda is clearly willing to adapt its twee EV prototypes for future buyers, maybe if we all wish hard enough, it'll happen.

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Let's hope that this tiny truck bed starts a trend in future EVs.

Honda, IED
Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
Andrew Krok
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.

Article updated on February 12, 2019 at 11:31 AM PST

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Andrew Krok Reviews Editor / Cars
Cars are Andrew's jam, as is strawberry. After spending years as a regular ol' car fanatic, he started working his way through the echelons of the automotive industry, starting out as social-media director of a small European-focused garage outside of Chicago. From there, he moved to the editorial side, penning several written features in Total 911 Magazine before becoming a full-time auto writer, first for a local Chicago outlet and then for CNET Cars.
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