Chevrolet's Blue Line concepts are the most normcore SEMA cars ever

They'd look more at home in the parking lot outside the Las Vegas Convention Center.

If you didn't have that horrible Eiffel 65 song stuck in your head, I bet you do now.

Chevrolet

While some automakers, like Hyundai, use the SEMA aftermarket trade show to showcase cars that breach the extremes of the modification spectrum, others are content to hawk actual, more sensible add-ons. Like Chevrolet and its Blue Line, for example.

Chevrolet's Blue Line concepts don't look much different than regular cars, but that's a purposeful decision. You see, these normcore concepts actually showcase parts the buyer can purchase and install without sending the factory warranty six feet under. Turbocharging an Elantra and adding a wide-body kit? Not so good for the warranty.

The first of Chevy's two concepts, the Malibu Blue Line, gives the car a sportier aesthetic. The suspension is lower, there's a spoiler out back, and its body panels rock a ground effects kit with various blacked-out trim pieces. Inside, there are sportier pedals and illuminated doorsills. There's also a performance brake kit on there, but that won't be sold to the public.

The second model, the Cruze RS Hatch Blue Line, starts off with a slightly sportier Cruze Hatchback. This one sports a performance exhaust, air intake system, brake package and lowering kit. Best of all, the aforementioned Cruze parts will be available to buyers by the middle of 2017. Both models feature white paint, blue tinted windows and special blue wheels. I'm sure there's a Tobias Fünke joke in here somewhere.

Of course, these SEMA-lite concepts won't be the only Chevrolet vehicles attending the show. There will be a few more, um, ambitious cars, like the Colorado ZH2 concept developed in conjunction with the US Army. We'll see them all in person in Las Vegas the first week of November.

"Excuse me. Does this window tint effectively hide my thunder?"

Chevrolet
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