X
CNET logo Why You Can Trust CNET

Our expert, award-winning staff selects the products we cover and rigorously researches and tests our top picks. If you buy through our links, we may get a commission. Reviews ethics statement

iFrogz Summit Wireless review: iFrogz Summit Wireless raises the bar for cheap Bluetooth headphones (review)

Small shortcomings aside, for $35 you're getting a lightweight, comfortable wireless headphone that sounds decent and can be used for running or just walking around.

carnoy-headshot-2019-2
David Carnoy
carnoy-headshot-2019-2

David Carnoy

Executive Editor / Reviews

Executive Editor David Carnoy has been a leading member of CNET's Reviews team since 2000. He covers the gamut of gadgets and is a notable reviewer of mobile accessories and portable audio products, including headphones and speakers. He's also an e-reader and e-publishing expert as well as the author of the novels Knife Music, The Big Exit and Lucidity. All the titles are available as Kindle, iBooks, Nook e-books and audiobooks.

See full bio
3 min read

iFrogz (a division of accessory maker Zagg) has a new line of inexpensive Bluetooth headphones out for 2016 holiday season, and the Summit Wireless, a sports model that retails for $35 or £30, is probably my favorite of the bunch. (It doesn't appear to be available in Australia, but the US price translates to about AU$47).

ifrogz-summit-wireless-03.jpg
7.2

iFrogz Summit Wireless

The Good

The iFrogz Summit Wireless is lightweight, comfortable in-ear Bluetooth sports headphone that's sweat resistant and delivers decent sound for its modest price point. It has a nifty magnetic clip system on the inline remote and has 10 hours of battery at moderate volumes. Included wings help create a secure fit.

The Bad

Looks a little cheap up close; unclear how well the headphones will hold up over time.

The Bottom Line

The iFrogz Summit Wireless may not be a steal at its modest price point, but it's still a good value in wireless sports headphones.

I can't tell you that it sounds great, but it does sound pretty good for the money, and -- just as importantly -- fits comfortably and securely and comes with a few different silicon tips and wings that help lock the buds in place while you're doing some sort of athletic activity or just walking around. (This is a noise-isolating in-ear headphone, so it will muffle ambient noise if you get a tight seal, and may present a safety problem if you're a runner and want to hear oncoming traffic).

ifrogz-summit-wireless-11.jpg
Enlarge Image
ifrogz-summit-wireless-11.jpg

What you get in the box (the headphone comes in black or red at launch).

Sarah Tew/CNET

I also like the headphone's signature design feature. On the inline remote -- iFrogz calls it a "wireless hub" -- there's a magnetic clasp that allows you to clip the headphone to your shirt. You can also wrap the cord around the remote, which houses the battery, microphone, and all the electronics, and keep everything in place with the clasp.

Battery life is rated at 10 hours at moderate volume levels and the headphone is sweat resistant, though it's far from waterproof, with only IPX2 certification (iPX5 would be preferable).

On Amazon, you'll find plenty of low-cost generic wireless sports headphones available from brands like Mpow and TaoTronics. They cost anywhere from $20-$45. Some aren't bad but they usually leave something to be desired in the design department.

ifrogz-summit-wireless-12.jpg
Enlarge Image
ifrogz-summit-wireless-12.jpg

The magnetic clasp clips to your clothing.

Sarah Tew/CNET

The Summit Wireless offers a step up in design, though you're still not looking at premium build quality (the headphones do a look a little cheap when examined up close). They worked fine during the week I tested them, but I can't tell you how well this headphone will hold up over several months of use.

As I said about the sound, it's good for the price -- for a wireless Bluetooth headphone anyway. There's a reasonable amount of clarity and if you can get a tight seal, the bass is satisfyingly punchy. The bass isn't incredibly tight and the sound feels a bit recessed at times, but I think most people will be happy with the sound.

ifrogz-summit-wireless-08.jpg
Enlarge Image
ifrogz-summit-wireless-08.jpg

Close up of the buds.

Sarah Tew/CNET

A headphone such as Jaybird's popular X2, which now sells for less than $100, sounds slightly better, but the difference isn't huge and I found the Summit Wireless more comfortable to wear. I should also note that the Summit Wireless worked fine as a Bluetooth headset for making calls, though it helps to keep the microphone clipped closer to your mouth (don't expect business-class performance). Callers said they heard me well enough, though they also heard a lot of ambient sound (I was making calls from a playground crowded with kids).

Small shortcomings aside, for 35 bucks you're getting a lightweight, comfortable wireless headphone that sounds decent and can be used for running or just walking around. It may not be a steal at that price point, but it's still a good value in wireless sports headphones.

ifrogz-summit-wireless-03.jpg
7.2

iFrogz Summit Wireless

Score Breakdown

Design 8Features 7Sound 7Value 7
Shopping laptop image
Get the best price on everything
Shop your favorite products and we’ll find the best deal with a single click. Designed to make shopping easier.
Add CNET Shopping