Koenigsegg goes green

Swedish supercar maker Koenigsegg and NLV Solar AG show a concept electric car with a range of 310 miles and a top speed of 170 mph.

Photo by CNET

Swedish company Koenigsegg, with its CCX supercar, was in contention for fastest production car in the world before it was bested by the Bugatti Veyron. But at the Geneva auto show, the company showed off a different side by launching the Koenigsegg Quant concept, a four-seater electric car. However, the company didn't stray too far from its supercar legacy, as the Quant is expected to hit 62 miles per hour in just 5.2 seconds and hit a top speed of over 170 mph.

Koenigsegg teamed up with NLV Solar AG to build the Quant, using a technology called Flow Accumulator Energy Storage (FAES) in place of traditional batteries and a special paint with photovoltaic properties for extra energy generation. With these technologies, and a relatively light curb weight of just 3,924 pounds, the Quant is expected to achieve a range of 310 miles, and more when the sun is shining.

Koenigsegg Quant
The Quant uses electric motors at each rear wheel.Photo by CNET

The Quant features an aerodynamic design and uses an electric motor at each rear wheel for propulsion. These motors do away with the need for a differential, lessening the weight and complexity of the drivetrain. In addition, all four wheels are equipped with regenerative brakes to enhance range.

For passenger comfort, the Quant has three-zone climate control and three video screens, with one in front and two in back. Although there are four seats, there are only two doors. The doors are extra long and open knife style, so there is no B-pillar. But even with the single doors, Koenigsegg has engineered separate side windows for the front and back.

The real mystery part of the Quant is the FAES system, which isn't detailed in Koenigsegg's press materials, other than referring to its use in the concept as "NLV mobile redox FAES." Koenigsegg claims it can be given a full charge in 15 minutes, and the claimed range would make it truly a breakthrough technology. The vehicle is currently far from production, as the concept shown at the Geneva auto show was mostly a plastic shell.

See more coverage of the 2009 Geneva auto show.

Close
Drag