Car Industry

Holden designers made a digital time attack car to smash Bathurst

The car was designed in honor of Holden's first win at Bathurst, 50 years ago.

The Holden Time Attack Concept was designed to digitally rip record laps at Mt. Panorama in honor of Holden's first victory there 50 years ago.

Holden

While I'm typically loathed to think of a rendering as a concept car, even I have to admit that this new Holden design, announced Friday, is pretty amazing-looking.

The design was created in honor of the 50th anniversary of Holden's first win at Australia's most famous racetrack, Bathurst. Where many of the cars racing at Bathurst are doing so for endurance, this rendering has been imagined as a time attack car, one that hits the track for one lap with no other cars, trying to beat the fastest time posted.

The Holden Time Attack Concept was designed entirely digitally in-house in Melbourne, Australia by Holden's team. No clay sculptures here! They used a number of highly sophisticated simulation models (definitely not Forza or anything) and likely consumed massive amounts of lemon squash during its creation.

"The cessation of Motor Shows in Australia left a hole in our automotive culture in some ways, and we lost a forum to showcase our passion and creativity to the Australian public with physical concept cars," said Richard Ferlazzo, design director for Holden. "However, with the realism and detail achievable through modern technology, I felt we could still deliver uniquely Holden concepts via virtual technology and digital media."

The design process for the concept wasn't just a bunch of blue-sky-solutioneering, yeah nah, the design team communicated closely with the engineering team to make sure that the vehicle was plausible-ish. Once it was done, the teams verified their work by 3D printing a model of the car and making a simulation video of it lapping Bathurst's Mt. Panorama circuit.

Hopefully, we get to drive this thing in a video game soon because it looks like it would be a blast.

Despite looking crazy futuristic, some of the design is rooted in reality thanks to the work of Holden's engineering department.

Holden